New York Times releases 100 Notable Books of 2012

bookshelf

(Photo via Flickr user David Trawin)

I have a terrible confession to make: The New York Times released its 100 Notable Books of 2012 today — and I haven’t read a single one.

I’ve read a few books that came out this year — J.K. Rowling’s “The Casual Vacancy,” Chris Cleave’s “Gold” — but apparently none worth mentioning. (I say that, of course, with a bit of snark, since I don’t truly believe that a book ignored by the NYT’s list is thereby worthless.)

But it was a little discouraging to realize all these (apparently) great books came out in the past 12 months, and I’ve missed them all. So, browsing through the list, which is divided into poetry or fiction and then non-fiction, I discovered — or rediscovered — a few I’d like to add to my list.

Sounds like it’s time for a monthlong vacation where all I do is read. (I know, I know — ha! — but a girl can dream, right?)

How many on the list have you read?

About Sarah Chain

I'm an avid reader and book lover living and working in downtown York. Follow me on Twitter at @sarahEchain.
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3 Responses to New York Times releases 100 Notable Books of 2012

  1. Teresa Cook says:

    I, too, have read zero of them. I looked at the list quickly and didn’t see any I’ve been wanting to read. I may have to reconsider for my Christmas list.

  2. Pat McGrath says:

    Even though I’ve read 75 books this year (I’m retired) only one of them was on the NYT list – “Canada”.

    • Sarah Chain says:

      Pat, when I was looking through, “Canada” was one that caught my eye — what did you think when you read it? Worth it, or skip?

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