Feed Your Soul charity dinner fills bellies, clothes bodies

William Penn Senior High School cafeteria was a busy place Saturday night.

William Penn Senior High School cafeteria was a busy place Saturday night.

The 5th Annual Feed Your Soul holiday dinner and clothing drive was a success, according to organizers Saturday evening.

More than 200 bellies were fed and dozens of people took home bags of clothing — all at no charge.

Wayne Scott, center, is shown here in 2011 accepting the Human Relation Commission awards during the 30th Annual Dr. Frederick Holiday Celebration.

Wayne Scott, center, is shown here in 2011 accepting the Human Relation Commission awards during the 30th Annual Dr. Frederick Holiday Celebration.

Many organizations stepped up to make this event a hit, including H.O.O.D., YaYa Girls, Operation Stand Up and Ladyz of Empowerment.

Tequila Ruffin aka “Milkyway” and Kim Stahle aka “Kharma” are part of the Ladyz of Empowerment motorcycle group. The group is made up of women who love to ride motorcycles and also give back to the community.

The women stood at the entrance of the William Penn Senior High School cafeteria Saturday, greeting people and directing them to seats.

“I love helping these individuals,” Ruffin said.

In the back of the cafeteria, the YaYa Girls folded clothes and helped find items of all sizes for the children, men and women who were in need.  About a months worth of donations were expected to be gone by the end of the night. If anything was left over, it would be sent to Helping Hands at the end of the day, said Alisha Shockley.

“I love that it’s free because a lot of thrift stores are actually too expensive for some families really in need,” said president of YaYa Girls, Marisa Wilson.

A line of only men served food.

“The women can bring them things when they run out but only men can serve,” said founder of Operation Stand Up, Rebecca Moore.

They plan it that way in hopes of setting an example to young men in the community that they can serve others, too.

Tammy Kabore, president of Ladyz of Empowerment, said they even had some students helping set up as early as 8 a.m.

“You always hear negative, negative, negative,” Kabore said. “Let’s just all work together and show our city the positive we can do.”

With so many organizations involved, Kabore said the event “is a little bit of everybody for one cause.”

Wayne Scott, founder of HOOD, was not able to make the event. He had been shot in the leg outside a North York club earlier that morning and was recovering after surgery, Moore said.

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About Rebecca Hanlon

Rebecca Hanlon is the health reporter with a religion sub beat at the York Daily Record/Sunday News. Follow her on Twitter @mrsbeccahanlon or on Facebook at facebook.com/byrebeccahanlon.
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