‘C’ is for healthy(ish) pumpkin oatmeal raisin cookies

They’re vegan, but there’s no need to be afraid.

You don’t usually hear the words “cookies” and “healthy” in the same sentence.

Unless they’re separated by the word “not.” Same goes for the words “vegan” and “tasty.”

But these treats break the mold.

I spent the better part of my mid-20s as a vegetarian. I made it three of those months without milk, eggs or cheese. While I know there are many great vegan recipes out there, I spent most of my time longing for the comfort foods of the non-veg world.

Everything I tried to make tasted like grass and sadness, but then I found these gems. A cookie that actually tasted like a cookie — it was a vegan miracle!

My meat-loving family still requests them every Thanksgiving, but I recently whipped up a batch for a co-worker’s birthday. Make no mistake: Pumpkin and nutmeg are not just for the fall.

And, they’re not too bad for you, I promise — especially if you cut out the oil and use a smidge less sugar than the original recipe calls for. Each cookie is just 70 calories and packs 1.6 grams of protein, 1 gram of fiber and 16 percent of your daily value of vitamin A.

Vegan pumpkin oatmeal raisin cookies

Adapted from Post Punk Kitchen, makes 48 cookies

Ingredients
2 cups flour
1 1/3 cups rolled oats
1 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1 cup sugar
2/3 cup applesauce
2 tablespoons molasses
1 cup canned pumpkin, or cooked pureed pumpkin
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup walnuts, finely chopped
1/2 cup raisins

Directions

Preheat oven to 350.

Mix together flour, oats, baking soda, salt and spices.

In a separate bowl, mix together sugar, applesauce, molasses, pumpkin and vanilla until combined. Add dry ingredients to wet in three batches. Fold in walnuts and raisins.

Drop by tablespoons onto cookie sheets, about 1 inch apart. Flatten the tops of the cookies with a fork or with your fingers. Bake for 16 minutes at 350 degrees.

Remove from oven and get cookies onto a wire rack to cool. These taste best when they’ve had some time to cool and set — and even better the next day.

About April Trotter

Editor of Smart. NEPA transplant. Penn State and Shippensburg grad. Kickball and craft beer enthusiast. Collector of cardigans. "Bennie and the Jets" fanatic. Contact me at atrotter@ydr.com, at "Smart magazine" on Facebook, @SmartMagPA on Twitter or by phone at 717-771-2030.
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