Not running is the worst

It was the day after I ran my first race, a half marathon, that I first heard the words plantar fasciitis. That was almost four years ago, and since then the words, and condition, have followed me like the annoying little brother I never wanted.

I’m not a doctor, despite hours of self-diagnosing on webmd, so I pulled this definition from the Mayo Clinic.

Plantar fasciitis (PLAN-tur fas-e-I-tis) involves pain and inflammation of a thick band of tissue, called the plantar fascia, that runs across the bottom of your foot and connects your heel bone to your toes. Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain.

Basically it’s not a huge deal, but when it pops up out of nowhere, it takes me off my running game for a few days and messes up any training I had planned.

The first time my heel exploded in pain, I went to a podiatrist who gave me inserts for my shoes and sent me on my way. Since then I’ve had only minor flare-ups which I tend to with ice and foot rolling. That was until Monday, when I woke up to find I could barely walk, much less go for my planned 5-mile run.

After dissecting any recent changes with a friend, we decided the culprit of this nasty flare-up was probably the addition of Jillian Michaels 30-day Shred video to my workout regiment. There’s lots of jumping involved and, because I never learn, I was not wearing my good sneaks and inserts while doing this.

I know I should not complain. I’m not currently training for any races, and if I take a break from running and ice and roll it, this should pass within a week or two. But I REALLY WANT TO RUN.

Running is how I deal with stress. It’s how I conterbalance all of the Christmas cookies that arrive daily in the office that I must eat. I thrive on structure. When you take away my running, the whole thing starts to crumble. I have trouble sleeping, I’m grumpy, my hair starts falling out. (Note: hair has yet to fall out but it’s only a matter of time).

And now is the time where I step back from my pity party and remind myself that I am incredibly lucky to be able to run. This week or two break should only make me appreciate that ability all the more. And the Christmas cookies I’m not burning off running this week will help keep me warm next week when I’m back out running in the cold.

 

 

How do you deal with injury or mandatory breaks in running? Do you welcome the break or throw a pity party like me?

About Kate Penn

I've been a staff photographer at YDR for about 6 years. I'm into visual media, running, and food. Reach me @k8penn
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One Response to Not running is the worst

  1. Sean Hermanns says:

    For me an injury can become an opportunity to work on another aspect of my fitness. If I cannot run because of a knee or ankle injury, I can focus on upper body strength that may have been neglected in my training. Instead of looking at an injury as a set back, I try to look at it as an opportunity for progress.

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