So here’s a hogmaw question

If you’re going to eat hogmaw… which I’m the first to admit I am NOT lining up to do… I’ve long contended that there’s a big debate over whether you actually eat the pig stomach or not.

I finally got my first response to my original post from July 2007 – last month!

New commenter Jamie said her grandmother used to make hogmaw when she was growing up in Stoney Creek Mills, near Reading. “The crispy side of the stomach was always fought over. We ate the whole thing in my family,” she said.

I’ll ask again: Is that the York County way? I don’t know if I could ever manage to eat what I know is a stomach, but if that’s the authentic eating method… who knows? Maybe I’ll get brave.

Also, I finally found a decent hogmaw picture online, and by decent, I mean slightly scary-looking.

hogmaw.jpg

It’s from a thread on the Sentinel newspaper’s message boards on eating Pa. Dutch.

About Joan

My name is Joan and I'm a lifelong Yorker. Throughout high school and college, I swore I was getting out of here as soon as possible. Now, a few years later, I can't think of anywhere I'd rather be. I love my town, and I hear every day from readers who love their towns, too. So please, connect with me and let's share what makes life in York County great. I'm here to help you enjoy this place as much as I do!
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7 Responses to So here’s a hogmaw question

  1. Louise says:

    Joni,
    Don’t eat that thing, it looks like it comes from outer space! I don’t want anything to happen to you.
    Love, Weez

  2. The other Jo says:

    The object in the photo looks like one of Dr. Oz’s specimens showing cancer or some other disease in an organ, or that woman’s 150 lb. tumor removed from her insides. I cannot imagine eating anything that looks like that.

  3. Andrea says:

    As a child, I can remember going to my uncle’s hog farm in the winter to butcher. I had 2 jobs. 1st was to clean the “Sausage casing” and stuff it, 2nd was to scrape and clean the stomach. Growing up around this, it’n not hard to imagine that when mom made hogmaw we would fight over the skin. The most prized were the thick ends. Dad always won. Now that I cook my own food, I don’t have to fight for my ends. Oh yeah, We have hogmaw for our New Years Day dinner.

  4. Lynn says:

    I grew up in my Grandfather’s butcher shop and my Grandmother made hog maw frequently. When I got married that was one dish I had to learn how to make. Our family, reluctantly, tasted it and now everyone loves it skin and all. If you like sausage and potatoes you would like it and you don’t have to eat the skin, but that gives it the flavor.

  5. Gene Anstine says:

    My grandmother used to make two hog maws for every holiday because I would eat one myself. Now I only make it for myself and a couple of friends. I wouldn’t eat the one in the picture either because it isn’t cooked.

  6. Andrea says:

    As a child growing up I can remember going to my uncle’s hog farm for yearly butchering. I had 2 jobs. 1st was to clean the “sausage casing” and stuff it, 2nd was to scrape and clean the stomach. So it’s not hard to imagine that when mom made hogmaw, we would fight over who got the most skin. Most treasured was,and still is, the thick ends. Dad always won. Now that I do my own cooking, there is no debate over who gets the ends. Oh yeah, we have hogmaw for our New Years Day dinner. Oh, one more thing, if you published a picture of a properly cooked hogmaw and not a raw one, it would look awhole lot better.

  7. Bob says:

    I grew up in Hanover, Pa. and my parents always made Hog Maw and to this day I think it is the greatest meal around. I don’t eat turkey so we have Hog Maw at Thanksgiving but this year I am all by myself since my wife left me after 35 years so I will have to do it on my own this year. If you never had it you will never know what you are missing and I eat the whole thing. It may look groose when raw but sure is great when it is done. You have to try it if you never have.

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