More on the endless wonder of hogmaw

A couple of weeks ago, editor and historian Jim McClure tackled the topic of hogmaw, always a favorite discussion point for readers over here on this blog!

That reminded me that I have some responses to share to some earlier posts on just that topic.

Reader Andrea writes: “As a child, I can remember going to my uncle’s hog farm in the winter to butcher. I had 2 jobs. First was to clean the ‘sausage casing’ and stuff it, second was to scrape and clean the stomach. Growing up around this, it’s not hard to imagine that when mom made hogmaw we would fight over the skin. The most prized were the thick ends. Dad always won. Now that I cook my own food, I don’t have to fight for my ends. Oh yeah, we have hogmaw for our New Year’s Day dinner.”

Another reader, Lynn, writes: “I grew up in my grandfather’s butcher shop and my grandmother made hogmaw frequently. When I got married, that was one dish I had to learn how to make. Our family, reluctantly, tasted it and now everyone loves it, skin and all. If you like sausage and potatoes you would like it and you don’t have to eat the skin, but that gives it the flavor.”

(Yes, I’m definitely not a fan of eating the skin, though I admit I still haven’t gotten brave enough to try the REST of it, either.)

Commenter wholli also weighs in on the skin/no-skin issue: “I remember hogmaw meals at family gatherings once a year and how delicious it was, so I was just looking to find a recipe for it ’cause all my aunts and mom are going who made it, so now I will attempt it myself. The lining is a personal call; half like it and others didn’t but none was ever left over.”

Perhaps my favorite comment came from reader Gene Anstine. He writes: “My grandmother used to make two hogmaws for every holiday because I would eat one myself.” Now, he says, he only makes it for himself and a couple of friends.

If you’d like to make one yourself, make sure to check out that post of Jim’s for two great recipes.

About Joan

My name is Joan and I'm a lifelong Yorker. Throughout high school and college, I swore I was getting out of here as soon as possible. Now, a few years later, I can't think of anywhere I'd rather be. I love my town, and I hear every day from readers who love their towns, too. So please, connect with me and let's share what makes life in York County great. I'm here to help you enjoy this place as much as I do!
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3 Responses to More on the endless wonder of hogmaw

  1. Tracey says:

    I wold only eat the skin as a child, then when I got a little older my Mom would make a smaller one for me of just sausage and potatoes while the rest of the family’s had cabbage in it also. Now I’m not a big fan of any part of it, but that may change again at some point in time!

  2. Mike Laucks says:

    My mother, grandmother and aunt made hogmaw for me from the time I was born (1939)until they passed on. My wife, who was born in Europe, never heard of it until she married me but is now as adicted to it as much as I am. I’ve often attempted to prepare it myself from old family recipes but it never turns out quite the same. Several years ago I made a life-changing discovery in that Miller’s Meat Market down on Indian Rock Dam Rd. sells pre-stuffed hogmaws at their stands at New Eastern and Central Markets as well as at their store on Indian Rock Dam Rd. All you do is stick them in the oven at 325 deg.F for about 4 hours and you get what is very close to my grandmother’s taste, certainly better than my attempts. I am not an advertiser for Millers’, merely a satisfied customer.
    Enjoy!!

  3. Mike Laucks says:

    My mother, grandmother and aunt made hogmaw from the time I was born (in 1939)until they passed on. My wife, who was born in Europe never heard of it until she married me and has become as adicted to it as I am. I’ve tried to make it myself from old family recipes but can never quite achieve the same taste. I made a life-changing discovery several years ago when I learned that Miller’s meat market down on Indian Rock Dam Rd. sold already stuffed howmaws at their stands at New Eastern Market and Central Market. All you do is stick them in the oven at about 325 degrees F for 4 hours or so. I’m not advertising for them but their version, although not quite the same as my grandmothers’, is pretty close and much better than my own attempts. Enjoy!!

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