Ask Joan: Third-grade teacher edition

Today’s Ask Joan features a bad-news update; the cat I mentioned last week had to be put to sleep, which was devastating for our family; but in good news, my week was made by receiving a letter from my third-grade teacher in response to a previous Ask Joan, which I’m glad to share today!

What’s inside
1. American Toy, Novelty Works sled
2. Seeking photo of Frederick St. Acme
3. Italian Oven recipe book sought
4. Info on Brook Leaf Love Nest
5. Memories of Weigelstown’s North Pole

1. Reader Harland Smeigh writes, “I have a wooden sled. I am not sure if it was my mother’s or my grandmother’s. I wonder if you can tell me when it was made … in York.” He says that on the sled, it says:
56 – Mfg By American Toy and Novelty Works – York PA – Patent Co

Anyone have any ideas about American Toy and Novelty Works? I’d love to be able to give Harland some more info.

2. I have another reader, E. Kerstetter, who writes, “We are having a 50th class reunion and are trying to locate a picture of the Acme grocery store on Frederick St. in Hanover. This was in the late 50s, early 60s, where they held block parties. I’ve contacted the Hanover Historical Society, Borough and Library with no success. I thought you may have an idea where I can find a picture?”

I checked our archives and we didn’t seem to have a photo of that Acme, but I thought perhaps someone reading might! If you do, please drop me an email to jconcilio@ydr.com so I can share!

3. A while back (like, several years ago), we shared memories of The Italian Oven restaurant. But earlier this year, Patrick McGuire wrote and said that he’d worked at an Italian Oven in Ohio for a few years and would love to get his hands on one of their recipe books.

He asked if anyone who had one could write to him directly; his email is patm1212@yahoo.com. If anyone has those recipes, please feel free to pass them on to Patrick!

4. Reader Ann Lutter of New Freedom wrote me a letter and shared a copy of the postcard seen here, of the “Brook Leaf Love Nest” in the Hellam area.

She wrote, “I came across this postcard with damage but mostly intact in my aunt’s possessions. Do you think any of your readers have ever heard of it? The Brook Leaf Love Nest in Hellam. Not sure if it was a private residence or maybe rented for honeymoon couples. The name is on the left corner of the platform and on the steps going up to the platform. The postcard has no writing on it nor a date.”

Well, in good news, Ann, I’m quite familiar with the Brook Leaf Love Nest; our editor, Jim McClure, wrote extensively about it in 2008 on his York Town Square blog, first in a post titled Brook Leaf Love Nest tree house known as Hellam honeymoon spot and then later, in 2012, in this “Part Two” post. Another fellow blogger, June Lloyd, wrote about the Love Nest on her Universal York blog in a post titled Hellam Tree House Makes the Movie News Reels.

As Ann mentioned was possible, this was often rented out to honeymooners; that is, until its demise via fire in the late 1940s. It was owned by Howard Emig and family, who rented it out through the 1920s and 1930s and into the 1940s. Quite a place; I wish I’d been able to see it, as I have a real soft spot for treehouses!

Ann, I hope you’ll take a look at those other links for much more detail about the Brook Leaf Love Nest.

5. One last memory/note for today; this one made me smile because I knew, as soon as I opened the envelope and saw the handwriting, who wrote the letter, in true Only in York County fashion.

It comes from Shirley (Coble) Hite, my third-grade teacher at Dover Elementary School, who I still remember quite fondly! She wrote in response to an earlier column about the various eateries owned by Ernie McCall, many under the name of The North Pole, specifically about a second North Pole location that some readers wondered about.

She wrote, “As a young girl, I remember the North Pole (located at the present site of the Turkey Hill Mini Mart at the corner of Emig Mill Road in Weigelstown now known as part of Dover).”

She continues, “My parents, Dale Sr. and Dorothy Coble, along with my two brothers Dale (Smokey) Jr. and Brian, and myself lived in a “double” house (now called a duplex) across from B&B Garage (later to become part of the land where Spangler’s Supermarket and now a vacant building and large macadamized parking lot). About every 1-2 months, our Dad would treat us to a “trip” to the North Pole to pick up submarine sandwiches which we took home to eat. They were ‘so good’ and to this day are probably the best ‘subs’ I have ever eaten.”

“I was sorry when it closed,” she concluded.

I was so happy to hear from Mrs. Hite, and especially when she signed her letter “Joan’s teacher at Dover Elementary School.” I love that about living in York County my whole life – that couldn’t happen if I went anywhere else. And with the added benefit of being able to shed some light on this other North Pole location? Well, that makes today pretty good.

Got any questions? Ask Joan using the form at right. I’ll attempt to answer them in a future “Ask Joan” column on this blog. I get a large volume, but I will feature three each week and answer as many as possible!

About Joan

My name is Joan and I'm a lifelong Yorker. Throughout high school and college, I swore I was getting out of here as soon as possible. Now, a few years later, I can't think of anywhere I'd rather be. I love my town, and I hear every day from readers who love their towns, too. So please, connect with me and let's share what makes life in York County great. I'm here to help you enjoy this place as much as I do!
This entry was posted in Ask Joan, Local memories and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Ask Joan: Third-grade teacher edition

  1. In 1927, the American Toy and Novelty Company of York, owned by Carl Oermann, bought out Acme Wagon Company in Emigsville and became the American Acme Company. Children’s sleds were the signature product of the American Toy and Novelty Company and then the American Acme Company. It was reported that the new company sold more than 150,000 sleds in 1927. I’ll see if I can find anything about the specific sled; however here’s a related post: http://www.yorkblog.com/yorkspast/2013/07/23/31-acme-wagon-company-in-emigsville-countdown-of-top-50-york-county-factories-at-the-end-of-19th-century/
    I recently found a neat 1959 North Pole ad and was doing a little research on it tonight. That ad included both locations; and specifically noted 2820 Carlisle Road. I opened a Bing.com map and typed in the address; it is adjacent to Emig Mill Road and the address is now a Turkey Hill Minit Market.
    Within the hour I opened Joan’s latest blog post and got a pleasant surprise. As soon as I read Shirley (Coble) Hite’s “Memories of Weigelstown’s North Pole,” I knew the 1959 ad and Shirley’s comments were meant to be together … I’m going to e-mail the ad for your use.

  2. june lloyd says:

    York County Heritage Trust Library/Archives has a good bit of into on Acme Wagon Company/American Acme Co./American Toy and Novelty Co./American Sales Co., include some business records from about a century ago. They made all kinds of things over the years: cider presses, wagons, sleds and toys. They made a lot of those rocking toys that kids could sit in with the silhouette of a pony or other animal on each side.

    • Joan … A sled by American Toy and Novelty Works, of York PA, would have been built between 1919 and 1927. Between 1917 and 1919, the company was known as York Novelty Works, and after 1927, American Acme Company.
      Sled Model 56 is part of their Monoplane Sled line. Based upon model numbering of all their sled lines, I’m guessing Model 56 was produced more towards the mid-1920s.
      Model 56 is a Steering Sled, meant for two riders; i.e. the front rider steered and the back rider is provided, out to the side, foot rests. Model 56 is 52 inches long, 7 inches high, 14-1/2 inches wide and weighs 14 pounds. All of this info comes from the Archives of the York County Heritage Trust.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>