Ejections stir flashback to ’07

Umpires ejected four Revolution on-field personnel in one game. Well that was the story Sunday in York.

Umpiring has been the story before. And it’s caused suspensions for outbursts from managers.

There have been other games with questionable ejections during the Revolution’s history.

None, however, could match what took place in 2007, in the first year York’s downtown ballpark opened.

With the ballpark still under construction, the clubhouses had yet to be built. Players changed in trailers on a dirt hill beyond the left field wall. So when York manager Chris Hoiles and outfielder Kaz Tanaka were ejected, the game had to be halted as Hoiles and Tanaka made the long walk to center field, awaiting a team employee to open the oversized gate.

Sidenote: Their ejections were also interesting in the fact Hoiles did not typically lose his temper, and Tanaka spoke almost no English.

The ejection of Tanaka meant the Revs did not have a full complement of outfielders. And when the game shifted to extra innings, York catcher Greg Brown finished the game in left field. He even wrangled down a pop fly despite what appeared to be his uneasiness in playing an unfamiliar position.

Winning has a way of lightening the mood, though.

Sitting outside the trailer watching the game from the big dirt pile beyond the left field wall, Hoiles sat next to Cannonball Charlie. When the Revs won, Charlie said Hoiles told him to fire the cannon — something that had not yet become a postgame tradition for victories.

And then there was Tanaka, who greeted Brown as he approached the trailer. Not saying any words, Tanaka pointed at Brown and then pantomimed a catcher sitting in a crouch while looking up to the sky for an imaginary pop fly. Brown couldn’t help but laugh.

About Jim Seip

Jim Seip wore a cookie monster costume to help close out the Spectrum on Oct. 31, 2009.

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