Religion important in lawmaking

By JAKE
MOKRIS
In a speech against the original version of the new immigration bill, Sen. Hillary Clinton completely surprised me. She said that the bill would incriminate “probably even Jesus himself.

About Scott Fisher

I'm opinion page editor and blogging coordinator for the York Daily Record/Sunday News and Yorkblog.com. Phone: 717-771-2049. Email: sfisher@ydr.com. Twitter: twitter.com/YDReditpage.
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8 Responses to Religion important in lawmaking

  1. KenBob says:

    In a speech against the original version of the new immigration bill, Sen. Hillary Clinton completely surprised me. She said that the bill would incriminate “probably even Jesus himself.

  2. Katie says:

    I think over the last few years Ms. Clinton has been trying to be seen as more of a moderate, just so she can grab more votes.
    On the issue of church and state, have you looked into tax exemption/ incorporation status for churches? Here’s a site with some great info: http://unregisteredbaptistfellowship.com/cvs.php
    It explains what a real New Testament church is like compared to a state-headed church.
    I don’t know whether America was ever a Christian nation, but I do know that most of America’s founding fathers claimed to be Christian, and that their works show it, i.e. the Declaration, G. Washington’s farewell address, and so many others.
    I will differ with you, Jake, on why people were worried about JFK’s presidency. You said it was “Anti-Catholics.” I believe it was that more people at that time understood that Catholics give their allegiance first to their -excuse me- cult. They would first obey ROME, then the U.S. I have nothing against Catholics, some of my friends are such, but they need to be born again (John 3:7).
    Here’s a site Catholics might want to check out: http://www.chick.com/reading/tracts/0040/0040_01.asp
    ~*~ Katie ~*~

  3. CEAVES says:

    Jake,
    The separation of church and religion will never be decided in my lifetime. I do not believe our lawmakers have the right to interpret our constitution to be favorable for things they think will help them get elected. I hate to say I have voted for individuals who said one thing during the campaign and did another when elected.

  4. Lucky says:

    Jake–good post. I think you might have overshot a bit when saying that her speech was a mixing of church and state. But that’s beside the point.
    People today (the MSM, bloggers, everyone) seem to have taken the separation of church and state to an extreme. The purpose of the first amendment establishes the liberty of people to worship as they choose, and prohibits the state from establishing their own religion. That’s it. Jefferson said that the purpose was the “build a wall of separation between church and state.” The above is what, I think, he meant.
    The reason it’s such a big deal to have the ten commandments in front of a courthouse is because its a symbolic endorsement of a particular belief system by a government body. Politicians can pretty much say the “Our Father” at a speech and it isn’t considered mixing church and state.
    Katie–
    I am a devout catholic. I don’t worship Mary as a God. I’ve been on both sides of the tracks–being raised Catholic and spending 3 years as a worship leader in a non-denominational contemporary Christian church. After three years I was heartbroken by what I saw and left the Church altogether, before finally returning home to Catholicism. The pamphlet you had us read, IMO, was completely ignorant and ridiculous. To outsiders, Catholicsm may look like a “cult” as you say, but believe me when I say this–I have seen so-called “Christian” churches and attended many of their services. I see it as extremely hypocritical that you would refer to Catholicsm as a “cult” and then have us read what you said.

  5. Kathy says:

    By her comments, Senator Clinton has implied that one of her reasons for opposing the immigration bill is the Bible. I think that the voters (especially her supporters) and the media should be asking if she plans to make the scriptures a litmus test for her support of other bills. Of course, we know that she does not use the scriptures as her true reason for supporting or opposing a bill, and that she said what she said in an attempt to get support for herself. If she did plan to consult the Bible before making a political decision, she should be consistent in always supporting the Biblical position. She doesn’t do that and just uses the scriptures when it’s convenient and to her advantage.
    Based on the lack of media coverage of Senator Clinton’s statements, the media has shown itself to be biased for the liberal/democratic position and against the conservative/republican position.

  6. Phil says:

    >>>>I don’t know whether America was ever a Christian nation, but I do know that most of America’s founding fathers claimed to be Christian, and that their works show it, i.e. the Declaration, G. Washington’s farewell address, and so many others.

  7. KenBob says:

    –Geezus, are people so dense as to believe that Hillary was actually “consulting” the Bible when making the quip about Jesus? If a weatherman says, “…boy my forcast is so hot that even the Devil himself will be sweating,” does that mean that he consults the Bible or Satanic cults to come up with his forcasts?? Get real. She could have just as well referred to Ghandi, John-Boy Walton or the Tooth Fairy –Jesus was referred to simply because he’s the quintessential poster boy for do-gooders. Don’t let your bias cloud your judgement.
    –Kathy, did conservative Fox News cover Senator Clinton’s statements to your satisfaction? If not, why not? If so, how many more hours/days/weeks/months did they spend on this “important” issue over what the “liberal” media spent? How much time would you like the media to devote to this issue? Should more time be spent on Hillary’s comment about Jesus than on the actual issue that caused her to make the comment –immigration?

  8. Katie says:

    I didn’t mean to offend you, Lucky. I did think that all good Catholics invoke Mary. I came across this Catholic site which spoke favorably of doing so… http://search.americancatholic.org/search?q=Mary+prayer&ie=latin1&oe=latin1&lr=&site=samp&output=xml_no_dtd&client=samp&proxystylesheet=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.americancatholic.org%2Facosearch.xslt&restrict=aco
    (Sorry it’s so long).
    The important issue is really what your faith is in. Are you working to get to heaven, or is your reservation already made? If you’re trusting in your works (i.e. baptism, church membership, faithfulness, other sacraments, etc.), you are “doing.” (Ephesians 2:9, “Not of works, lest any man should boast.”)
    If you’re trusting fully in Jesus Christ and Him alone, it is “done.” In John 19:30 Jesus said, “It is finished.”
    I can understand your feelings toward mainstream “protestantism.” I am not a part of it.
    ~*~ Katie ~*~

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