Essays, essays and more essays

By JAKE
MOKRIS
In 10 years, when I look back on the month of September 2006, I will remember it as the month my life belonged to various colleges. I had to put off reading for leisure, skip jogging, forget about a few chores, and give much of my free time to one difficult task: filling out college applications.


I’m not one of those students who apply to every Ivy League college, every other top college, and a few extra schools to round off their college list at 15. I’m applying to eight colleges, which is within the range you might hear admissions officers recommend. So I haven’t intentionally overwhelmed myself with applications.
Seven of the colleges I’m applying to take the Common Application. The Common Application instructions for 2006-2007 say, “The Common Application simplifies the college admission process by saving time and eliminating duplication of effort — copies of the Application for Undergraduate Admission can be sent to any of the participating college.

About Scott Fisher

I'm opinion page editor and blogging coordinator for the York Daily Record/Sunday News and Yorkblog.com. Phone: 717-771-2049. Email: sfisher@ydr.com. Twitter: twitter.com/YDReditpage.
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4 Responses to Essays, essays and more essays

  1. Matt Dunphy says:

    College applications don’t hold a candle to mortgages and immigration.
    The last thing I think our education system needs is for it to be -easier- to get into college. It seems like they have to practically reteach the high school curriculum to most kids entering college nowadays.
    Good internet security does not have to be slow — the site is not running massive encryption algorithms against every bit you send them. It’s just that these schools often scrimp on their programming staff, and hire people who might only have a college education in programming, as opposed to real-world application programming. Load balancing? What’s that? Relational database design? I skimmed that chapter and coasted through the exam.

  2. Nathan says:

    What about the essay on the ACTs or SATs? YOu’ve already written one essay for college when you take that test, so I don’t see the point of writing another one, especially when most of the application essays are read fully, just skimmed.

  3. Jake says:

    Thanks for commenting, Mr. Dunphy, Nathan.
    I submitted my Common Application to several colleges yesterday, and as I filled out one of the colleges’ supplements, guess what I found? Another essay I had to write.

  4. Kathy says:

    Matt, have you taken a look at college applications and financial aid forms these days? Having bought and sold several houses, I would say that morgages are easier, and often cost less than college tuition. Just recently, I read an article about a person who was in the business of counseling families and aiding them in the college application process.
    On the one hand, colleges should be selective and admit only qualified students. However, good students are now forced to apply (at a cost of $50 to $75 each) to numerous colleges to insure that they will get in to one of them. Because of advertising and more students applying to more colleges, the admittance rate is quickly falling. Right now, the ball is in the colleges’ hands. This is sort of ironic, since the student is the consumer/shopper who will be paying the cost.
    And, personally, I would rather see a student spend time on classwork and learning than on writing numerous college essays.

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