What not to write to Princeton

ScottMokrisI found out yesterday that I did not get into Princeton University. I was disappointed, but I have now decided to go to Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia.
I worked hard on my essay for Princeton’s supplement and I thought it was very interesting and memorable. Here is what I wrote (what wasn’t good enough to get into Princeton):
December 24th, 2010
Dear Santa Claus,
I am working on my essay for Princeton University’s Common Application supplement, and I thought you would be able to help. The theme is “Tell us about a person who has influenced you in a significant way,” and I chose you. Although some people may say that it is silly to pick a commercial and fictional character such as Santa as the person who influences me in a significant way, I think that too few people see the ideals you encourage and recognize your influence.
The obvious ideal that you inspire in me and others is that of giving. Most of the year, people think about themselves. As Christmas nears and most people are shopping, you inspire us to give from our hearts to make others happy. Whether it is by watching a Christmas movie or seeing one of your “helpers” dressed as a Santa listening to (hopefully) small children’s wishes or collecting money for a charity, we see how you exemplify the spirit of giving to others and how giving can change lives.


Another, less evident, ideal that you instill in the world is that of creativity and imagination. You open children’s minds to the possibilities of life with your story and with the gifts you give them. Children learn to be creative and imaginative with these toys. Kids make fantastical kingdoms and amazing stories with the toys and spend hours exploring them. Some even spend a lifetime with the stories inspired by your gifts.
The most important ideal that you inspire in me is that of hope. During the time of Christmas, everyone is full of hope. You give children hope that maybe they will get what they want for Christmas, that maybe their lives will get better, and that maybe their mommy or daddy will be home for Christmas. They cling to the idea that you can help them get what they want or need.
The hope you instill is not limited to children. Adults too are filled with hope when thinking about you. They think that, if you can not exist and still change the lives of so many people, their lives can change also. Maybe they can get that better job or maybe they can become healthy. Without the hope you provide, so many people, young and old, would be disheartened.
Thank you for reading my letter, Santa. I know you are busy, but I just wanted to let you know how you influence me and many others. Without your constant upholding of the ideals of giving, creativity, imagination, and hope, the world would be a much different place. I am glad that I do not live in that world and instead live in a world where a fake, jolly, old man can change the lives of so many people in such good ways.
Sincerely,
Scott Mokris
P.S. Even though I know you don’t exist, I can’t help asking for a Taylor Guitar. Maybe you have some pull with Bob Taylor.

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2 Responses to What not to write to Princeton

  1. Mrs. Mokris says:

    Maybe you’ll get the guitar.

  2. John VI says:

    I don’t mean to nitpick, but at the beginning, you said that you are writing to Santa to ask for help writing your essay. However, you end it by saying you just wanted to tell Santa how he influences you, rather than request his help. Isn’t that a little contradictory?

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