Category Archives: dams

Artists recognized the Susquehanna’s beauty

We are blessed with an abundance of gorgeous scenery in York County. It seems especially striking when you get away from the towns into some of the more remote corners. The long eastern border along the Susquehanna River affords many … Continue reading

Posted in 1770s, 1800s, 1810s, 1880s, 1930s, 1970s, 2010s, bridges, Camp Security, Continental Congress, dams, electricity, ferries, Lower Chanceford Twp., Native Americans, Revolutionary War, roads, settlement, Susquehanna River, Universal York, York County, York Furnace | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Artists recognized the Susquehanna’s beauty

Susquehanna ice piled 40 feet high in 1911

Last week Jim McClure included a link to photos on his blog post of a few years ago of Susquehanna River ice pushing over the banks in January 1959. They were originally shared by Jim Buckner, and taken by his … Continue reading

Posted in 1910s, 1950s, dams, disasters, floods, Long Level, Safe Harbor, Susquehanna River, Universal York, water power, Wrightsville, York County, York Furnace | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Susquehanna ice piled 40 feet high in 1911

York County people have weathered some serious storms

We should not panic when we hear of impending storms and flooding, but neither should we be complacent. If an area is to be evacuated, the smart thing to do is leave before you find yourself underwater. Fellow blogger Blake … Continue reading

Posted in 1810s, 1880s, 1930s, 1940s, 1970s, dams, disasters, floods, Lewis Miller, Universal York, York City, York County | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on York County people have weathered some serious storms

Benjamin Latrobe’s map of the lower Susquehanna River shows wild York and Lancaster county shores

Latrobe thought the Turkey Hill rapids or falls “most formidible.” Benjamin Henry Latrobe has been called one of the fathers of American architecture, but his work surveying and mapping the Susquehanna River in 1801from Columbia, Pa. to Havre de Grace, … Continue reading

Posted in 1800s, canals, Chanceford Twp., Columbia, PA, dams, ferries, Hellam Twp., Lancaster County, Long Level, Lower Windsor Twp., Maryland, Peach Bottom Twp., Safe Harbor, Susquehanna River, transportation, Universal York, water power, Windsor Township, York County | Comments Off on Benjamin Latrobe’s map of the lower Susquehanna River shows wild York and Lancaster county shores

Early Port on the Susquehanna River

1864 Bridgen’s map of Conestoga Township showing dam. 1860 Shearer & Lake map of Chanceford Township. A friend recently alerted me to an article about the port of Safe Harbor on the east bank of the Susquehanna River. The article … Continue reading

Posted in 1820s, 1830s, 1840s, 1850s, canals, Chanceford Twp., dams, Lancaster County, Safe Harbor, Susquehanna River, Universal York, York County | Comments Off on Early Port on the Susquehanna River

Huge Snakes in Hanover Area

A while ago I wrote about how we like to impress others with what we have–the biggest and best. Click here to read about giant pumpkins and corn. The Hanover newspapers reported on the really big black snakes seen in … Continue reading

Posted in 1870s, dams, Hanover, Manheim Twp., Penn Township, snakes, Universal York | Comments Off on Huge Snakes in Hanover Area

Why Is Part of the Susquehanna River Called Lake Aldred?

McCall’s Ferry (Holtwood) Power Plant Under Construction, ca.1907. Electric power was on the front page 100 years ago. The Merchants Electric Light, Heat, and Power Company distributed hydroelectricity generated by the York Haven Water and Power Company, which utilized giant … Continue reading

Posted in 1900s, 1910s, business, dams, electricity, history, industry, Susquehanna River, Universal York, water power, York County | Comments Off on Why Is Part of the Susquehanna River Called Lake Aldred?