The 1914 Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck; also 1914 Indian, Thor & Yale Motorcycles

The 1914 Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck Ad in Harrisburg Auto Show edition of Harrisburg Telegraph (Issue of March 14, 1914 from the Digital Collections of Penn State University Libraries)

The 1914 Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck Ad in Harrisburg Auto Show edition of Harrisburg Telegraph (Issue of March 14, 1914 from the Digital Collections of Penn State University Libraries)

 

Last week I wrote about Vulcan Technology in Pullman’s Electrically Controlled Gasoline Automobile.  In that post, I noted the Harrisburg Auto Show of 1914 also included five motorcycle makes: Harley-Davidson, Henderson, Indian, Thor and Yale.  Reader Rick Wall wanted to see any of the motorcycles pictured in the 1914 Auto Show flyer.

The Fifth Annual Harrisburg Auto Show opened the evening of March 14, 1914, in the Arena-Rex Building at Third and Delaware Streets.  The Arena-Rex Building was the largest building available to hold such a show in Harrisburg during 1914.

The Harley-Davidson exhibit at the show featured their side-car and their motorcycle truck; with the motorcycle truck pictured in their ad.  The caption under the photo of the motorcycle truck stated:

After six years’ study of the light delivery problem and more than two years’ rigid testing of the Harley-Davidson motorcycle truck, as it now stands, we are offering a proposition that has actually demonstrated its worth.  In the hands of retailers and wholesalers all over the United States, as well as in the Government service and general parcel delivery.

Gasoline consumption, 30 to 40 miles per gallon with full load [600 pounds].  Speed, 2 to 35 miles per hour.

The Harrisburg Auto Show edition of Harrisburg Telegraph (Issue of March 14, 1914 from the Digital Collections of Penn State University Libraries) also contained pictures of the 1914 Indian, Thor & Yale Motorcycles, as shown in the following illustrations.  The Henderson Motorcycle was not pictured in the publication.

Indian1914

Thor1914

Yale1914

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

Posted in all posts, Automobiles, Manufacturing, Pennsylvania, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The President Lincoln Torpedoed on Return Trip; York sailor KIA

George B. Hoffman, of York, PA; was among those Killed in Action

Photo of The President Lincoln (Appearing on Page 1 of the June 4, 1918 issue of the York Daily; from Newspaper Microfilms at York County Heritage Trust)

Photo of The President Lincoln (Appearing on Page 1 of the June 4, 1918 issue of the York Daily; from Newspaper Microfilms at York County Heritage Trust)

“The President Lincoln Torpedoed on Return Trip” is the headline to this photo appearing on page 1 of the June 4, 1918 issue of the York Daily.  The photo caption states:

The President Lincoln, an 18,500 ton vessel, formerly was a Hamburg-American transatlantic steamship plying between Europe and New York and was taken over by the government at the declaration of war.  It was torpedoed last Friday while returning from Europe to the United States.  Among the 26 enlisted men of the Navy on board reported missing was George B. Hoffman, of this city.

One-Hundred Years Ago, on July 28, 1914, the assassination of the Austrian Archduke Ferdinand ignited World War I.  United States President Wilson pledged neutrality as the war spread across Europe.  It was German’s sinking of the occasional neutral merchant ship that grew into an onslaught against U.S. merchant ships by early 1917 that resulted in the United States declaring war on April 6, 1917.

This is the first post in a series, over the next few years, looking at local World War I servicemen Killed in Action.  The June 4, 1918 issue of the York Daily contained the following article on George B. Hoffman:

A telegram was received last evening announcing that among the missing from the United States President Lincoln, which was torpedoed by a hostile U-boat last Friday, was George B. Hoffman, of this city.  Hoffman enlisted June 18, 1917, at the local recruiting office, at the age of 17 years.  He was sent to Newport, R. I., where he received his preliminary training.  Later he was transferred to the Brooklyn navy yard.  In December last, he was assigned to the ill-fated boat President Lincoln, as an ordinary seaman.  He was returning from his fourth trip when his boat was sunk.

While visiting in this city on leave of absence, last November, he remarked to his stepbrother, Albert H. Billet, that on his return he would ask to be assigned to a seagoing boat, which request was granted.  Mr. Billet received a postcard and a photograph of his stepbrother on May 3, and informed him that on his return he would visit him.

At the time of his enlistment he was employed at the plant of the American Chain Company, and lived with his stepbrother, Albert.  His father and stepmother, Mr. And Mrs. Michael B. Hoffman, were formerly of this city and now reside at Ridley Park, Delaware County.  A sister, Mrs. Melissa Matchet, of Harrisburg, and a sister Miss Naomi Hoffman and a brother Charles Hoffman, reside at Ridley Park.  He also has three stepbrothers, Jacob Billet, living at Ridley Park; Luther Billet, Norristown, Montgomery County, and Albert H. Billet, 572 West Philadelphia Street, this city.  He is a member of the Bible Class of the West Street Methodist Church, of which I. N. Pickes is the teacher.

Three officers and twenty-three enlisted men of the Navy, were reported missing yesterday from the torpedoed American transport President Lincoln.  One officer was captured by the submarine.

TabletsOfMissingGeorge B. Hoffman is memorialized on the Tablets of the Missing in Brookwood American Military Cemetery in Woking Borough, Surrey, England.  Images are from the American Battle Monuments Commission.

George B. Hoffman, Seaman, is also memorialized in York, PA, on the Columns of the York County Government Center (the former York County Court House) on East Market Street and at the Veterans Memorial Gold Star Healing and Peace Garden.

The U.S.S. President Lincoln was the largest U.S. Naval vessel to be lost in the First World War.  Continue reading for a short history of the U.S.S. President Lincoln and a photo of the plaque placed in memory of those lost with the ship.

Continue reading “The President Lincoln Torpedoed on Return Trip; York sailor KIA” »

Posted in all posts, Memorials, Pennsylvania, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Vulcan Technology is in Pullman’s Electrically Controlled Gasoline Automobile

Motor Vehicles at the 1914 Harrisburg Auto Show

Pullman Ad in Harrisburg Auto Show edition of Harrisburg Telegraph (Issue of March 14, 1914 from the Digital Collections of Penn State University Libraries)

Pullman Ad in Harrisburg Auto Show edition of Harrisburg Telegraph (Issue of March 14, 1914 from the Digital Collections of Penn State University Libraries)

This ad for the 1914 Pullman Model 6-46A appeared in the Harrisburg Auto Show edition of the Harrisburg Telegraph.  The Fifth Annual Harrisburg Auto Show opened the evening of March 14, 1914, in the Arena-Rex Building at Third and Delaware Streets.  The Arena-Rex Building was the largest building available to hold such a show in Harrisburg during 1914.

The show featured twenty-one automobile makes: Abbott, Buick, Cadillac, Chalmers, Cheverlot, Cole, Ford, Haynes, Hudson, Jeffery, Krit, Marathon, Maxwell, Metz, Oakland, Overland, Pullman, Reo, Saxon, Stanley and Studebaker.  Truck makes in the show included: Autocar, Case, Chase, Morton, National and Reo.  The show also included five Motorcycle makes: Harley-Davidson, Henderson, Indian, Thor and Yale; see motorcycle ads in the post The 1914 Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck; also 1914 Indian, Thor & Yale Motorcycles.

The Vulcan Electric Gear Shift had it origins in 1909 U. S. Patents by Frank Beemer.  The Vulcan Motor Devices Company of Philadelphia purchased the rights to these patents.  Vulcan worked on commercializing the Electric Gear Shift design.  Initially they had some problems, however by 1913 Vulcan had a marketable product.

Pullman Motor Car Company in York, PA, was one of the initial car makers to offer the Vulcan Electric Gear Shift on one of their models; in this case the 1914 Pullman Model 6-46A.  The appeal of these devices created a stampede from other carmakers for the product.  The Vulcan Motor Devices Company had trouble meeting demand and ultimately decided to outsource the manufacturing to The Cutler-Hammer Manufacturing Company of Milwaukee; they held the exclusive license under the Vulcan Patents.

VulcanGearsCutler-Hammer published a manual entitled Gear Shifting by Electricity, written by H. E. Coffin.  This image of the arrangement of the shift buttons in the center of the steering wheel is from that manual (Manual is available digitally at the Hathi Trust Digital Library).  To shift gears, one merely pushed the appropriate button while depressing the clutch petal and the appropriate shifting solenoids responded electrically to shift gears.

Other Pullman related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

Posted in all posts, Automobiles, Buildings, Businesses, Manufacturing, Pennsylvania, Transportation, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 17 . . Production . . Part 4

RAILCAR GOLD    Chapter 17 . . . Production   add 2 blanks after GOLD

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 17 . . . Production

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century.  This is Part 4 of Chapter 17 . . . Production.  A new part will be posted every Thursday.  Recent chapters stand alone, starting here; however new readers may want to start at the beginning.

Continue reading “RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 17 . . Production . . Part 4” »

Posted in all posts, Buildings, Businesses, Manufacturing, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Railcar Gold, Railroads, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1860 Buildings 11-20 in East Region of Springettsbury Township

Left Area of East Region in what is now Springettsbury Township; from Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County, PA & Penn Pilot Aerial Photo, from Sept. 15, 1937, of Same Area (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

Left Area of East Region in what is now Springettsbury Township; from Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County, PA & Penn Pilot Aerial Photo, from Sept. 15, 1937, of Same Area (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

Within this illustration, I’ve pointed out ten 1860 buildings and their corresponding location on a 1937 aerial photo.  I’m working my way around Springettsbury Township, ten buildings at a time, until all buildings from 1860 are visited.  The present commercial corridors are being visited first.  See the post: Springettsbury Township building tally during 1860, for my specification of the four regions.

Other posts in this series include:

Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County contains the owner/occupant of most buildings; for example (e12) is C. Weiser.  Additional information on C. Weiser can be found by consulting the 1860 Census of the United States; where one discovers this is 38-year-old farmer Charles Weiser.

The results after consulting 1860 Spring Garden Township census records are shown below.  Spring Garden Township records must be used because Springettsbury Township was formed from the northeast part of that township on April 20, 1891.  The order of visitation, of the census taker, often provides assistance on who are neighbors and the tabulation of “value of real estate” separates the landowners from the renters or tenants:

StCensusE11to20

One of these 1860 buildings (possibly still) stands at this address:

  • [e14] – 3321 East Market Street

Deed and family history research concerning the early history of the area of East Market Street occupied by buildings e12, e13 and e14 has the owner of the land encompassing all three 1860 buildings as Charles Weiser (1796-1867); he is residing in York during 1860 and likely built some, or all, of these buildings earlier, when he lived in the township.

The 1860 township occupant, renting the farm building e12, is Charles Weiser (1822-1899); a distant relative to Charles Weiser (1796-1867).  Likewise, buildings e13 and e14 are being rented out; logically to Henry Sheffer and Peter Ziegler, based upon order of visitation by the 1860 Census taker.

When Charles Weiser (1796-1867) died July 17, 1867, his son John A. Weiser is the new owner of these properties.  Bloomingdale is both identified as the general area and as the large home at 3405 East Market Street.  According to research by Historic York, 3405 East Market Street was built in 1887, per tax records; possibly in place of the original e13 building from the 1860 map.

After John A. Weiser died on September 20, 1889; his brother Charles S. Weiser (1838-1909) becomes the new owner of these properties.  George Prowell’s 1907 History of York County notes in Volume I, page 1071: “Among the beautiful homes in Springettsbury are … Blooming Dale, owned by Charles S. Weiser.”

The house between the oldest building at 3321 East Market Street and the big one at 3405 East Market Street has the address 3323 East Market Street.  An architectural review puts the date built for 3323 East Market Street as circa 1880; i.e. built by either John A. Weiser or his brother Charles. In 1913, Charles’ widow, Isadora Weiser deeds the properties to Mary Weiser Frey, who had previously married Robert Shaeffer Frey in 1905.  Robert “Pappy” Frey was a constable and a state legislator.

My goal is to get community involvement.  If anyone has a story associated with past owners of these properties, please post a comment.

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

Posted in all posts, Buildings, Family Histories, Maps, Pennsylvania, Roads, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

#16 John C. Schmidt & Company, Chain Manufacturer in York is founded by a Hall of Fame Industrialist

John Charles Schmidt (1919 Photo from his Hall of Fame article on Page 19 of the November 1st, 1919 issue of the American Artisan and Hardware Record)

John Charles Schmidt (1919 Photo from his Hall of Fame article on Page 19 of the November 1st, 1919 issue of the American Artisan and Hardware Record)

 

Several times a year, the Chicago trade publication American Artisan and Hardware Record selected a Captain of Industry that was profiled in a feature they called Hall of Fame.  John C. Schmidt of York, Pennsylvania, was given the honor in the November 1st, 1919 issue of the publication.  This photo of John Charles Schmidt is from that Hall of Fame article.

In 1899, John C. Schmidt & Company manufactured chains in York, PA.  Even though the name includes “and Company,” John C. Schmidt was the sole owner.  The #16, in the post headline, signifies that in the year 1899, there were only fifteen companies containing a work force of more employees in all of York County.

AAHrecord1919I’ve seen short news blurbs in the American Artisan and Hardware Record about their Hall of Fame Industrialists attending a dinner, in their honor, in Chicago.  I’m not sure if an accompanying dinner applied to all selections, because I could not locate such a news blurb for some of the honorees, including John C. Schmidt; however that may only indicate that these dinners were not always publicized.

The initial paragraphs of the feature on John C. Schmidt delve into metaphors expounding, “Prosperity is within the power of every normal human being.  It is gained and held by work—never by watching the clock.”  The biographical part of the 1919 article follows:

There is no mystery in the success of John C. Schmidt, President of the Schmidt and Ault Paper Company, York, Pennsylvania.  He has earned everything, which he possesses, intellectually as well as financially, by giving full values of thought and work in return.  He was born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, March 14, 1859.  While he was still very young, his parents moved to York, Pennsylvania, where he attended a private school and the York Collegiate Institute until 1875.  Subsequently, he traveled with his parents in Europe, and spent one year in school at Stuttgart, Germany.

On his return to America, he took a position with P. A. & S. Small Company, hardware merchants of York, Pennsylvania.  He remained in their employ from 1876 to 1880.  In the latter year he went into the chain business for himself as a manufacturer in York, Pennsylvania, under the firm name of John C. Schmidt and Company.  A few years thereafter he bought out the Keystone Chain Company of York, and operated both plants until 1890, when he consolidated them in a new location in York, Pennsylvania.

In 1899, he was instrumental in the organization of the Standard Chain Company, a combination of thirteen different factories scattered throughout Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Canada.  He became first president of the Standard Chain Company, and held that position until 1916, when he sold out the entire company to the American Chain Company.

About 1898, he engaged in the manufacture of paper under the name of the Codorus Paper Mills, which was some years later changed into a corporation known as the Schmidt and Ault Paper Company, of which he became and continues to be president.  Since his retirement from the chain business he has devoted himself chiefly to the manufacture and marketing of various kinds of paper.  His main point of contact with the hardware trade is through the making of sheathing paper.

He is a director in the York National Bank, the York Railways Company, and the York Gas Company, all of York, Pennsylvania.  During the war he was active in Red Cross work and served as Chief of the Chain Section of the War Industries Board in Washington, D. C.

By way of hobby, he is a florist and orchardist.  He plays golf well enough to get satisfaction out of it.  His chief pleasure, however, is in the management of his business, because through it he is constantly widening the circle of his friends.  And these he considers a precious form of riches.

Continue reading for more details about John C. Schmidt and his chain businesses.

Continue reading “#16 John C. Schmidt & Company, Chain Manufacturer in York is founded by a Hall of Fame Industrialist” »

Posted in all posts, Buildings, Businesses, Manufacturing, Pennsylvania, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Memories of Miller’s One-Room Schoolhouse and the Surrounding Area

1947 Interior Photo of Miller’s Schoolhouse in Springettsbury Township (From September 4, 1947 Issue of The Gazette and Daily; in the Newspaper Microfilms at York County Heritage Trust)

1947 Interior Photo of Miller’s Schoolhouse in Springettsbury Township (From September 4, 1947 Issue of The Gazette and Daily; in the Newspaper Microfilms at York County Heritage Trust)

This Gazette and Daily photo captures the interior of Miller’s Schoolhouse in Springettsbury Township during the beginning of the 1947-1948 school year.  The teacher, Mrs. Erma Daron, normally taught students spanning eight grades in this one room, however this year there are no eighth graders in the class.

Erma1926Mrs. Erma Throne Daron had a very long teaching career, which included many years at Miller’s.  After graduating in the Class of 1926, at the State Normal School in Millersville (now Millersville University), Erma’s first teaching job, during the 1926-1927 school year, was at Miller’s.

This is Erma S. Throne’s Class of 1926 Yearbook Photo.  The photo is from Ancestry.com’s collection of scanned yearbooks; specifically page 68 of the 1926 Touchstone, the Yearbook of the Class of 1926 at the Pennsylvania State Normal School in Millersville, PA.

After her initial year at Miller’s, Erma is moved around to other One-Room Schoolhouses in the Springettsbury Township School District.  Between 1927 and 1935, Erma Throne taught three years at Stony Brook; followed by two years at Glades and three years at Mr. Zion, before returning to Miller’s.  Erma then taught at Miller’s from 1935 to 1951; including her first year of teaching, that is 17 school years as the teacher at Miller’s School.

During 1940, Erma Throne married Franklin H. Daron.  When the One-Room Schoolhouses closed in 1952, Erma Daron continued to teach in the newly formed Central School District.  In a comment to my post on Monday, Jim Fahringer noted, “I knew Mrs. Erma Throne Daron. When I first started to teach in Central School District in 1969, Mrs. Daron was still doing substitute teaching.  Her husband, Frank, actually built the house we lived in.”  Erma’s obituary in 1994 noted that she taught in the Springettsbury Township and Central-York School districts for 44 years.

Erma’s classmates at Millersville in 1926, wrote this about her in the yearbook:

Erm’ who is ever seen with a smile and who is always chatting unceasingly is a true classmate.  Late and early she has a cheery word for everyone, and usually contrives to make everybody feel just a little more cheerful when she is with them.  We are confident that the enthusiasm and the zeal with which she entered upon her work here will assure her success in the role of a teacher—a good teacher.

Comments with your memories of Erma Daron are welcome.

Turk Pierce provided memories of Miller’s One-Room Schoolhouse and the surrounding area in the mid-1940s.  When Turk states that he walked down the hill to school, the initial section he traveled is now called Spring Ridge Road.  That road extends up the hill from Ridgewood Road, west of the Alpine Road junction.  The Pierce Family lived in the highest building on that very steep hill.  Here are Turk’s memories:

In 1945 I started first grade at Miller’s School.  The building still stands, as a private residence, on Heindel Road.  (When I attended, Heindel Road came to a T at Concord Road.  The roads have changed quite a bit.)  The teacher was Erma Daron, who lived on Locust Grove Road in Stony Brook.  The school had about 32 students, eight grades and no electricity or running water, just outhouses.  After eight grades, students went to Hellam High School.

On my first day, I remember wearing white shorts.  As I walked down the hill, I joined other children.  The first was Sylvia Wolf, who was six years older and used to baby-sit us.  She was the granddaughter of Mr. And Mrs. Henry Wolf and they lived on Ridgewood Road northwest of the Alpine Road junction.  The house next to theirs, east of Alpine Road, on Ore Bank Road, was home to the Hewitts.  Gary was my age, Janet a year or two younger and Gladys four or five years older.  East of them, up the hill, lived Marlin Miller, he was younger than me, with fiery red hair.

At the bottom of Alpine Road was Preston (Pret) Chronister family.  All younger than me, Audrey was the oldest, then Judy and at least another girl until a boy was born.  In the wintertime Pret would charge people to skate on his frozen pond.  Catty-corner from them was a hermit, Mr. Hauser.  When he died, in the 1970s, I had a chance to go into his house and it was crammed full of junk.  It has been fixed up very nicely now.  A private road ran from Ridgewood Road down to Pleasant Valley Road, and on this road lived the Sterner brothers in two adjacent houses.  Mike and Pat, who I think were cousins, were our playmates.

There were people named Inners and another house on Pleasant Valley Road, which ended at Pleasant Acres Road, now called Arbor Lane, as it dead ends at Route 30.  On the corner a house was built around 1950 and Bill Markey, my age, lived there with his family.  We used to play in the woods across the street; these woods have been torn up for the new Pleasant Valley Road.  On down Pleasant Valley Road was a family named Crowe, with children a little younger than I was; the Flinchbaughs, empty nesters; and the Dietzes.  Ray Dietz was my father’s boss at S. Morgan Smith and he later sold garden tractors and my father helped him with that, also.  He had a machine shop behind his house, which can still be seen from Route 30.  The Dietzes’ son Ray, Jr., built a house just north of his parents’ for his family.

The Bell’s house was taken for Route 30.  Gloria was in eighth grade when I was in first and George was a few years older than I was.  Next to them was the Rubys.  Ruth Ann was my brother’s age.  Then the Ferrees; Carl was my age and my best friend, but we got in trouble for breaking some windows at the Heindels’ tobacco barn.  Freddie Hubley, a little younger, lived next to the Ferrees.  Evelyn Heindel was between my brother and me and we heard recently she was killed in a horseback riding incident when she was in her 20s.  She had a younger brother, I think.

The school also drew from a couple of houses west of Mt. Zion Road.  John Roth, whose father, I think, managed the Meadowbrook Farms, was my age.  Also living in that area, were the Harper girls, Patsy and Mary.  I was between them in age.  The final area from which the school drew was the trailer park behind the Paddock.  I remember two girls who babysat us coming from there, Vivian Witherow and Norma Jean Tew.  Also a Japanese family (Tomasso?) lived there after the war, with Richard and Naomi coming to Miller’s.  Lee Bowman is another trailer park boy I remember.  The oldest boys at the school were Tommy and Clarold Ness, who lived on a farm near the school.  The farmhouse still stands next to the York County Prison.  Tommy was 16 and in second grade and Clarold 14 in fourth grade.  Today they would be special-ed, but Mrs. Daron handled them pretty well.

A correction will be made to the to the early roads drawn as yellow lines, on a 2014 Bing.com aerial photo, in my post on MondayWhen Miller’s was utilized as a schoolhouse, i.e. before 1952, Turk Pierce noted the playground was south of the schoolhouse and the road looped on the north side of the building.  The road was changed to loop around the south side of the schoolhouse, as it does today, after the building became a private residence.

Turk also noted two additional details.  The schoolhouse was surrounded by farmer’s fields on the east and south, and by sort of a jungle to the west, along the creek.  He thought Heindel Road was the north-south road to the T, as it came from Heindel’s farm and asked the question, wasn’t the east-west road, by the schoolhouse, Concord Road?  If anyone can confirm the road names prior to 1952, please comment.

The following photo does not go back to school days, although it is close.  This detail is from an aerial photo taken July 11, 1956 by Dave Allen and is from the Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Committee Archives.  The view is looking to the northeast; I’ve noted Miller’s Schoolhouse location, surrounded by open fields.

Millers1956

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

Posted in all posts, Buildings, Pennsylvania, Roads, Schools, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 17 . . Production . . Part 3

RAILCAR GOLD    Chapter 17 . . . Production   add 2 blanks after GOLD

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 17 . . . Production

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century.  This is Part 3 of Chapter 17 . . . Production.  A new part will be posted every Thursday.  Recent chapters stand alone, starting here; however new readers may want to start at the beginning.

Continue reading “RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 17 . . Production . . Part 3” »

Posted in all posts, Buildings, Businesses, Manufacturing, Pennsylvania, Railcar Gold, Railroads, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tractor Seat Chair or Modern Art; You Decide

Illustration from United States Patent No. 644,506 (Colorized and Shaded by S. H. Smith, 2014)

Illustration from United States Patent No. 644,506 (Colorized and Shaded by S. H. Smith, 2014)

I happened upon this image while looking for a United States Patent related to a future post.  My first thought, this could easily be a piece of modern art.  I was not surprised that the patentee was from York, PA, because that was one of fields I’d specified in my search.

I’ve colorized and shaded this illustration from United States Patent No. 644,506.  The patent was issued to Walker A. Dromgold, of York, PA, on February 27, 1900.

Header from United States Patent No. 644,506 (United States Patent and Trademark Office)

Header from United States Patent No. 644,506 (United States Patent and Trademark Office)

The Hench & Dromgold Company made agricultural implements in York, PA.  S. Nevin Hench and Walker A. Dromgold were the owners.  Their company was located at the northwest corner of North Hartley Street and the Railroad Tracks.

The seat in the illustration was used in horse drawn agricultural implements produced by Hench & Dromgold, however this is the same basic seat design that later appeared in many early tractors.  Walker A. Dromgold stated in this patent:

This invention relates to improvements in chairs, and particularly to that class known as “park or lawn seats.”  The object of the invention is to produce a chair which will yield to the weight of the occupant.

Furthermore, the object is to produce a chair composed of iron, in which the legs, seat, and back are clamped in place by a single bolt, which arrangement simplifies the construction and makes it comparatively inexpensive.

Futhermore, the object of the invention is to produce a novel form of back in which an upper portion is arranged with a yielding or spring connection attached by the bolt above referred to.

Finally, the object of the invention is to produce a chair of few parts, which will prove strong, durable, and efficient, as well as satisfactory in use.

The drawings page from United States Patent No. 644,506 follows:

DromgoldChair3DromgoldChair4

YorksPast posts of a few York, PA related United States Patents:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

Posted in all posts, Businesses, Manufacturing, Pennsylvania, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Miller’s One-Room Schoolhouse (~1860-1952)

Miller’s One-Room Schoolhouse in Springettsbury Township (From Collections of York County Heritage Trust; Photo by Scott W. Knaub in 1941)

Miller’s One-Room Schoolhouse in Springettsbury Township (From Collections of York County Heritage Trust; Photo by Scott W. Knaub in 1941)

This is a photo of Miller’s One-Room Schoolhouse as it stood along Heindel Road during 1941 in Springettsbury Township.  The photo was taken by Scott W. Knaub and is from the Collections of the York County Heritage Trust.  Following the 1951-1952 school year, it was one of the last five One-Room Schoolhouses that closed in Springettsbury Township.

Students received an education in this schoolhouse from about 1860 to 1952.  Through, and including the 1950-1951 school year; students, spanning eight grades, were taught in this one-room.  During the final year as a schoolhouse, it was used for students spanning grades 1 to 6.

In terms of the present surrounding landmarks, I’ve indicated the location of Miller’s Schoolhouse on the following Bing.com Aerial Photo.  I’ve crossed out Concord Road and Davies Drive, since they did not exist at present locations when Miller’s was a schoolhouse.  The yellow lines indicate the location of early roads in the area.

2014 Bing.com Aerial Photo over a section of Springettsbury Township, York Co., PA (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

2014 Bing.com Aerial Photo over a section of Springettsbury Township, York Co., PA (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

In 1856, a tiny 0.08-acre lot was set-aside at a “T” intersection for a school building.  This lot was distinctively in the middle of a farm lane, on the boundary between John Miller’s and John Stricker’s farms.  Today that building still stands as a private home at 3565 Heindel Road; as seen in the following photo.  It is still uniquely located, as if it was originally placed in the middle of Heindel Road.

Millers2014

I’ve seen various years stated when this building was first utilized as a schoolhouse; among them are 1856, 1860 and 1861.  Since a schoolhouse does not appear at this location on Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County, circa 1860 is probably the best way to state the starting year for Miller’s One-Room Schoolhouse.

The building ceased being a schoolhouse on September 6, 1952, when the School District of Springettsbury Township sold the building on the 0.08-acre lot to Reginald H. Heindel and Alverta S. Heindel, his wife.  There have been a number of private owners since that time.

Look for my post on Friday for memories of Miller’s One-Room Schoolhouse and the surrounding area by a former student.  Continue reading for related posts and a compilation of the teachers that taught at Miller’s:

Continue reading “Miller’s One-Room Schoolhouse (~1860-1952)” »

Posted in all posts, Buildings, Maps, Pennsylvania, Roads, Schools, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments