Amber Light drive-in on Queen Street

A month ago questions about the Amber Light drive-in were asked of me. Then, a few days ago Terry Downs brought up the Amber Light. These, out-of-the-blue, queries were unusual, for it had been at least 30-years since I last heard about that drive-in; located at the intersection of South Queen Street and Springwood Road. In terms of today’s road numbering, it was located at 2039 South Queen Street.

This Amber Light ad appeared in the November 15, 1947, issue of The Gazette and Daily. The Amber Light drive-in sold hot and cold sandwiches and featured Warner’s ice cream.

I selected this specific ad because there was an additional story to go with it. The ad notes, “A Good Place to GO after the Show.” The following day, November 16, 1947, was the first day when the blue-law ban on showing Sunday movies was lifted in York.

I answer Amber Light questions and provide memories with aerial photos later in this post. Click on this LINK for a yorkblog.com Full View of the three original photos/illustrations in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of photos/illustrations, or if they have been removed from the ydr.com site.

Within that yorkblog.com site, the York Daily Record is presently experiencing gremlins, which, on some platforms, results in a new window opening at findbetterresults.com; a site no longer used by the York Daily Record. While the York Daily Record works on correcting this problem, simply close that window; the linked blog page, within yorkblog.com, that you were intending to reach should appear.

The gremlin also appears on the other yorkblog.com sites: Cannonball site of Scott Mingus, Only in York County site of Joan Concilio, Universal York site of June Lloyd, and York Town Square site of Jim McClure, where you can continue to access Jim’s older posts prior to October 30, 2015. As with all the yorkblog.com sites, the “Search this blog” within the page continues to be a fantastic search tool within each individual site.

My dominant memory about The Amber Light is when my parents were reminiscing, close to 30-years ago, about building their first home. The 2150 South Queen Street house was constructed during 1948 on a quarter-acre lot at a corner of the farm of my grandparents, Emanuel and Cora Barshinger.

After the house was put under roof, Dad, Harold L. Smith, and my grandfather, Luther S. Smith, finished the house. Mom, Esther L. Smith, and Dad would also often work on the house a few evenings and during weekends. They enjoyed using the curb service at the Amber Light drive-in, since they were usually in their work clothes. Mom enjoyed seeing many of her friends and children of friends who did the curb service. On the west side of Queen Street, at that location, was the farm of Mom’s grandfather; John H. Barshinger.

John and Ellen Barshinger had 15 children; 10 boys and 5 girls. Son Wilson W. Barshinger was the next owner of the 10-acre farm of his father; its address: 2038 South Queen Street. Most of the other boys, including my grandfather, had farms along South Queen Street, stretching to Spry. The produce from many of these farms was sold at the City Market in York.

I’ve annotated the following 1955 aerial photo. For this post, I use it to point out the location of The Amber Light drive-in and the strange intersection of roads at that point. South Queen Street was the through road. Springwood Road and Hollywood Drive had stop signs. Due to a high number of accidents, many times ending up in Wilson’s front yard, an amber warning light was placed at that intersection; and hence the name of the drive-in.

The October 9, 1955, aerial photo comes from the York County Archives. The handwriting, on the photo, is from country planning in the 1950s and 1960s. The printed annotations and color shading are mine. This photo will also be used in a future post about the “Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm” in York Township; which has the same ownership string as the previously written about “Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm” in Springettsbury Township.

My research indicates Joseph S. Stees was the original owner of The Amber Light drive-in and was established “shortly after the war.” About 1951, the drive-in is operated by Bob & Laura Fix under a new name; The Sun-Dial. It is later known as Kauffman’s Sun-Dial for a number of years. The drive-in is converted to Lehman’s Service Station in 1959, and remained a service station until recently. I point out the location where The Amber Light was located using the following 2017 Google aerial photo.

Related links include:

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Codorus Navigation illustrated

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, the 11-miles of canal and slackwater, via the Codorus Creek, allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River.

Part ten features an illustration highlighting the location of the principle features of the Codorus Navigation Works, along the Codorus Creek, between York and the Susquehanna River.

I began with a relief map of the applicable section of York County, Pennsylvania; which contained a few of the modern roads, for orientation purposes. As was learned in the earlier posts in this series, the location of existing mills and forges, prior to constructing the navigation works, figured prominently in the placement of the navigation locks from York through Dam 5 at Brillinger’s Mill.

Recall in part 2 of this series, canal engineer Simeon Guilford’s design for the lower half of the Codorus Navigation Works was quoted in the newspapers of late 1829, as: “In the Narrows, between Brillinger’s mill and Codorus forge, four dams will have to be erected—The first of these will be twenty-one feet high, requiring three locks of seven feet each to overcome a fall. The next three dams will overcome a fall of thirty-six feet, six inches. The forge dam will not be raised, and to pass it, the construction of crib work, on the north side of the stream and within it, is recommended. At the outlet a canal will be required along the shore of the Susquehanna to the still water above Chestnut ripples, at the mouth of the Codorus.”

Details and placement of Dams 6 through 9, and Forge Dam 10, on the illustration, will be explained as I explore them individually during the next several posts in this series. The “Seal of the Codorus Navigation Company” comes from an impression in the collections of the York County History Center; over which gold shading has been added.

Click on this LINK for a yorkblog.com Full View of the original illustration in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of the illustration, or if it has been removed from the ydr.com site.

Within that yorkblog.com site, the York Daily Record is presently experiencing gremlins, which, on some platforms, results in a new window opening at findbetterresults.com; a site no longer used by the York Daily Record. While the York Daily Record works on correcting this problem, simply close that window; the linked blog page, within yorkblog.com, that you were intending to reach should appear.

The gremlin also appears on the other yorkblog.com sites: Cannonball site of Scott Mingus, Only in York County site of Joan Concilio, Universal York site of June Lloyd, and York Town Square site of Jim McClure, where you can continue to access Jim’s older posts prior to October 30, 2015. As with all the yorkblog.com sites, the “Search this blog” within the page continues to be a fantastic search tool within each individual site.

The links and index to the first nine parts of this series follow:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Veteran Henry F. Emswiler should be honored

York County veteran Henry F. Emswiler died October 4, 1918, of wounds received in action; as he served in Europe during World War I. While Emswiler is honored on the bronze memorial tablets flanking Gate 4 at the York Fairgrounds and is buried in the nearby Greenmount Cemetery, he is not among the 197 York Countians honored on the World War I panels, fronting four columns, at the York County Administration Center, located at 28 East Market Street in York, PA.

After researching Henry F. Emswiler, I think he should be honored on the East Market Street panels. I provide the reasons why in this post.

Click on this LINK for a yorkblog.com Full View of the four original photos/documents in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of photos/documents, or if they have been removed from the ydr.com site.

Within that yorkblog.com site, the York Daily Record is presently experiencing gremlins, which, on some platforms, results in a new window opening at findbetterresults.com; a site no longer used by the York Daily Record. While the York Daily Record works on correcting this problem, simply close that window; the linked blog page, within yorkblog.com, that you were intending to reach should appear.

The gremlin also appears on the other yorkblog.com sites: Cannonball site of Scott Mingus, Only in York County site of Joan Concilio, Universal York site of June Lloyd, and York Town Square site of Jim McClure, where you can continue to access Jim’s older posts prior to October 30, 2015. As with all the yorkblog.com sites, the “Search this blog” within the page continues to be a fantastic search tool within each individual site.

Quoting the complete Associated Press article on the October 4, 1921 dedication of the WWI tablets and newly created memorial entrance, at the York Fairgrounds: “York, Pa., Oct. 4. — World War veterans, who made the supreme sacrifice, were lauded to-day by Lieutenant Governor Edward E. Beidleman in an address delivered at the unveiling of memorial tablets and the dedication of the memorial gate at the York fair grounds. This gate was erected in honor of the York County soldiers who were killed in France. More than 5,000 persons heard the Lieutenant Governor, who substituted for Governor Sproul, the State Executive being too ill to attend. Edward J. Henning, Assistant Secretary of Labor, also spoke. The dedication of the memorial gate was preceded by a parade of the World War and Spanish-American War veterans and school children. Two gold star mothers, Mrs. Latimer Sayers and Mrs. Charles Neff, unveiled the memorial tablets.”

The tablets contain the following words plus the names of those in York County who “gave their lives in defense of liberty, right and justice.”

I think it would be a great tribute, to these veterans, by cleaning up these tablets; especially this year, since a great majority of them gave their lives during 1918.

I got a surprise when I compared the names on the Fairgrounds WWI tablets to the 197 names on the four WWI panels fronting the columns of the former York County Court House; now the York County Administration Center at 28 East Market Street in York, PA.

There are SEVEN names on the Fairground WWI tablets in addition to the 197 that appear on the Court House WWI panels. Those names are: Albert D. Bell, Walter B. Dick, Henry F. Emswiler, Charles H. Heaps, Henry Knaub, John Austin McKee, and James F. Shuman.

Five of these SEVEN veterans appear the book “York County and the World War 1914-1919” by Clifford J. Hall and John P. Lehn. They are in the section devoted to the York County patriots who gave their lives in national service during the World War.

I’ll start by researching the two veterans who did not appear in that book, Henry F. Emswiler and James F. Shuman; thinking they would have the most reasonable explanation for not being honored on the Court House WWI panels. I was wrong in that supposition, per my research of Corporal Henry F. Emswiler.

The best way to start researching a WWI veteran is via pension details, of which copies of original documents are available on Ancestry.com. The only Henry F. Emswiler with a York County connection appeared in the following Henry Franklin Emswiler WWI Veterans Service & Compensation Record from pension application approval for his widow Stella Amanda Emswiler, when she resided in Camp Hill, PA.

The Henry Franklin Emswiler on this document was born in York, Pa, and died October 4, 1918, of wounds received in action. He had served overseas from May 7, 1918 until his death. Census, vital and family history records, available at the York County History Center, provide the early history of the likely Henry F. Emswiler in York, Pa:

Henry F. Emswiler was born March 17, 1899, as the son of David & Bianca Emswiler. The family initially resided at 316 East Philadelphia Street and by 1910 the family had moved to 1120 East Philadelphia Street in York. Henry grew up with a 6-year older brother, Samuel, and a 6-year younger brother Clair. Catharine and Warren were also children in the family; although they both died as young infants.

Henry’s mother died when he was 11-years-old. Henry’s father died when he was 14-years-old. They both are buried in Greenmount Cemetery; along with Catharine and Warren. I checked Find-A-Grave and located the following Henry F. Emswiler headstone in Greenmount Cemetery, listing death on October 4, 1918; i.e. the same date of death as the Henry Franklin Emswiler WWI Veterans Service & Compensation Record previously discussed, so I was confident I had identified the correct Yorker to go with those service records.

This headstone appears to have additional details below ground level; likely the top of the headstone was broken off years ago and what remained was inserted in the ground. The 1930s transcription record of all the cemeteries in York County, housed at the York County History Center, records for Greenmount Cemetery: “Henry F. Emswiler, Died Oct. 4, 1918, Aged 20 Years, 112th Inf. 28th PA Div., Killed in Action in France.”

I did not find Henry’s marriage details to Stella at the York County History Center, so I expanded my search. On April 3, 1918, at the Harrisburg Court House, a marriage license was issued to Henry Franklin Emswiler, Camp Hancock, Georgia, and Stella Amanda Rogers, Harrisburg.

In the April 10, 1918 issue of The Evening News (Harrisburg, PA) it is reported, “Mr. and Mrs. William Rogers, 943 Paxton Street, announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Stella A., to Private Henry Emswiler, of York.” Henry married while on a furlough, just prior to being shipped overseas. After Henry departs for Europe, his wife, Stella Amanda Emswiler, continues to live with her parents, at 943 Paxton Street; which is the person and address Henry gave to notify, should he die.

Henry’s military record indicates he was inducted at Harrisburg in the Pennsylvania National Guard on June 24, 1916; i.e. at the age of 17-years-old. In the Guard, he was promoted to Private First Class on January 22, 1917, then to Corporal on July 26, 1917. When transferred? to the regular army on November 15, 1917, he was back to a Private and while serving in Company D, 112th Infantry, 28th Division in Europe, Henry was promoted to Corporal on August 1, 1918. He was killed in action on October 4, 1918.

Henry F. Emswiler was born and lived his whole life in York, PA, except for his time in the service, including the furlough, where he was married to Stella Rogers in Harrisburg. After giving his life, in service to his country, Henry’s body was buried in York County. Would you consider Henry Franklin Emswiler a York Countian? I do, and thus believe he should be honored; by having his name added to the WWI tablets along East Market Street.

Links to related WWI posts:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Mr. and Mrs. Mahlon N. Haines

Mr. & Mrs. Mahlon N. Haines appear in a group photo during a 1916 gathering at the Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm. At that time, the Haines family lived in East York; a short distance from that farm in Springettsbury Township.

Why were Mr. & Mrs. Mahlon N. Haines included in the Schaszberger-Dempwolf group photo? Old newspaper articles suggest that Haines was good friends with Edward F. Schaszberger and Reinhardt Dempwolf; the heads of their respective families in that photo. Later in this post, read about a 1913 trip Mahlon Haines took to Florida and Cuba with Edward F. Schaszberger, the father-in-law of Reinhardt Dempwolf.

J. A. Dempwolf Architects designed Mahlon’s first suburban residence; located on the northwest corner of North Rockburn Street and East Philadelphia Street. That 1913 residence was the first of at least five buildings that Haines utilized Dempwolf Architects to design; many of these Dempwolf drawings are noted as drawn by RD, i.e. Reinhardt Dempwolf.

The photo of the whole gathering appears later in this post. Click on this LINK for a yorkblog.com Full View of the three original photos in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of photos, or if they have been removed from the ydr.com site.

Within that yorkblog.com site, the York Daily Record is presently experiencing gremlins, which, on some platforms, results in a new window opening at findbetterresults.com; a site no longer used by the York Daily Record. While the York Daily Record works on correcting this problem, simply close that window; the linked blog page, within yorkblog.com, that you were intending to reach should appear.

The gremlin also appears on the other yorkblog.com sites: Cannonball site of Scott Mingus, Only in York County site of Joan Concilio, Universal York site of June Lloyd, and York Town Square site of Jim McClure, where you can continue to access Jim’s older posts prior to October 30, 2015. As with all the yorkblog.com sites, the “Search this blog” within the page continues to be a fantastic search tool within each individual site.

Mahlon N. Haines married June Brown Irwin on October 20, 1909; he was 34-years-old and she was 24-years-old. Their children were born: September 5, 1910 (Stanley E. Haines), August 25, 1912 (Mahlon N. Haines II), and September 29, 1916 (June Irwin Haines).

Here is the 1916 photo of the whole gathering at the Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm. The zoomed-in view of Mrs. & Mr. Mahlon N. Haines comes from the upper right. At the time of the photo, June Haines was 31-years-old and Mahlon Haines was 41-years-old.

Writing on the back of the photo identifies the individuals. From left, sitting: Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. Schaszberger, Mrs. Charles (Amanda) Herman, Rev. G. W. Enders, D.D.; standing: Mrs. & Mr. Reinhardt Dempwolf, Master John Armour Dempwolf, Miss Annie K. Schaszberger, Peter Z. Kesler, Mr. Jacob T. Kopp, Mrs. & Mr. Mahlon N. Haines.

On January 17, 1913, Edward F. Schaszberger and Mahlon N. Haines left for a trip to the Isle of Pines. Following the Spanish-American War, the Isle of Pines became an American territory in the early 1900s. The Isle is a remote island 60-miles south of the western end of Cuba. The Isle was returned to Cuba in 1924, whereupon the island became the site of Cuba’s maximum security prison. Before he came to power, Fidel Castro was a prisoner there for 6-years.

The January 15, 1913 issue of The York Daily reported the itinerary for the Yorkers trip to the Isle of Pines: “Edward F. Schaszberger and Mahlon N. Haines, both of this city, leave Friday from Baltimore, on the Merchants and Miners steamship Susawanna, for Jacksonville, Fla. From there they go through Florida to Key West, over the famous Oceanic railroad, thence to Cuba and the Isle of Pines, where they will visit Mr. Haines’ mother. Mrs. Haines has an orange and grapefruit plantation on the Isle of Pines. They will return home from Havana, Cuba, by way of New York City.”

Reinhardt Dempwolf had a business association with Mahlon Haines. J. A. Dempwolf Architects designed Haines’ first suburban residence in 1912. It was completed in the Spring of 1913 and still stands today on the northwest corner of North Rockburn Street and East Philadelphia Street in Springettsbury Township, as shown in this 2018 photo.

From 1915 to 1925, Mahlon Haines utilizes J. A. Dempwolf Architects to design at least four additional buildings. The first of these was The Haines Shoe Company headquarters building; which opened in 1915 at 231 North George Street in York. Unfortunately that 3-story building was torn down in the 1960s to create several off-street parking spaces.

In 1921, Dempwolf designed the 4-story Haines Building, which still stands on the northeast corner of East Market Street and North Duke Street in York. RSDC is presently renovating this building at 101 East Market Street; with offices planned on the first floor and 10 new apartments on the upper floors.

In December of 1917, Mahlon Haines purchased 199-acres of farmland adjoining the east side of present day Haines Road: he names this farm Haines Acres. In 1922, Dempwolf designed a Haines Acres suburban home for Mahlon Haines. That home still stands as part of the Eastminster Presbyterian Church at 311 Haines Road.

In 1925, Dempwolf designed the 5-story, 47-room Haines Hotel on the northwest corner of North George Street and West Philadelphia Street; although no longer used as a hotel, it still stands.

Links to related Haines posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Schaszberger-Dempwolf farm aerial views

Dave Wiley asked if I had a photo of the Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm. An historic aerial photo was easy to obtain from the Penn Pilot web site, however he specifically wanted a better view of the farm buildings. A zoomed-in section of one of Karl Ort’s aerial photos in the collections of the York County History Center provided this neat aerial photo of that farm in Springettsbury Township; it is a view looking to the northeast.

The whole aerial photo, from which this zoomed-in section came, was posted a year ago in this post: Karl Ort’s aerial photo of East York. The Schaszberger-Dempwolf farm buildings are centered in that whole photo, about one-third from the top.

Click on this LINK for a yorkblog.com Full View of the two original photos in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of photos, or if they have been removed from the ydr.com site.

Within that yorkblog.com site, the York Daily Record is presently experiencing gremlins, which, on some platforms, results in a new window opening at findbetterresults.com; a site no longer used by the York Daily Record. While the York Daily Record works on correcting this problem, simply close that window; the linked blog page, within yorkblog.com, that you were intending to reach should appear.

The gremlin also appears on the other yorkblog.com sites: Cannonball site of Scott Mingus, Only in York County site of Joan Concilio, Universal York site of June Lloyd, and York Town Square site of Jim McClure, where you can continue to access Jim’s older posts prior to October 30, 2015. As with all the yorkblog.com sites, the “Search this blog” within the page continues to be a fantastic search tool within each individual site.

The stream, known as “Three Mile Run,” which flows into Mill Creek, is located nearby the farm buildings. That is the stream that crosses Memory Lane and runs under the parking lot of the McDonald’s at the corner of Industrial Highway and Memory Lane. You can read more about that stream in the post: Naming of Three Mile Run waterway in Springettsbury.

Drawings and a photo of a 1916 gathering at the Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm were recently donated to the Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Committee. One of the drawings shows the metes and bounds of the farm. I’ve drawn those property boundaries on the following annotated March 19, 1938 Historic Aerial photo from the Penn Pilot web site.

The eastern boundary of the 135-acre Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm ran the whole length of Memory Lane in Springettsbury Township; stretching from frontage along East Market Street to frontage along Whiteford Road.

Newspaper articles from the early 1900s reported the intersection of Memory Lane (and Haines Road) with East Market Street easily flooded if it rained hard. An open drainage ditch from that intersection ran across the Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm to Three Mile Run. One of the donated drawings shows a 1938 settlement with York County for the size of that drainage ditch to increase to 9-feet wide and 4-feet, 10-inches deep.

Look closely at the 1930 aerial photo at the beginning of this post. I know some will raise the question: What are all those things placed throughout the fields behind the buildings and north of the railroad tracks?

When I was young, my grandfather Barshinger occasionally let me help harvest corn in his field besides our house. He harvested by hand. The corn stalks were left standing. Eventually the corn stalks were cut off at the base and tied together in bunches, to dry out further; ultimately becoming livestock feed.

Those corn stalk bunches could be what is seen throughout the Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm fields. Another possibility could be straw bunched together following the harvest of wheat.

Related links include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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At the Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm in 1916

Drawings and a photo of a gathering at the Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm were recently donated to the Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Committee. Seated at the left part of that photo is Edward F. Schaszberger and at his shoulder is his grandson, 10-year-old, John Armour Dempwolf. Immediately behind Edward is his daughter Nellie; married to Reinhardt Dempwolf standing in the background. Nellie’s sister Annie Schaszberger rounds out this part of the 1916 photo by C. W. Simon.

The photo of the whole gathering appears later in this post. Click on this LINK for a yorkblog.com Full View of the two original photos in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of photos, or if they have been removed from the ydr.com site.

Within that yorkblog.com site, the York Daily Record is presently experiencing gremlins, which, on some platforms, results in a new window opening at findbetterresults.com; a site no longer used by the York Daily Record. While the York Daily Record works on correcting this problem, simply close that window; the linked blog page, within yorkblog.com, that you were intending to reach should appear.

I was informed at an OLLI class, which I taught yesterday, the gremlin also appears on the other yorkblog.com sites: Cannonball site of Scott Mingus, Only in York County site of Joan Concilio, Universal York site of June Lloyd, and York Town Square site of Jim McClure, where you can continue to access Jim’s older posts prior to October 30, 2015. As with all the yorkblog.com sites, the “Search this blog” within the page continues to be a fantastic search tool within each individual site.

Architect Reinhardt Dempwolf was associated with his older brother architect John Augustus Dempwolf. In 1897, Reinhardt married Nellie Schaszberger, the elder daughter of Springettsbury Township farmer Edward F. Schaszberger.

Reinhardt Dempwolf’s son John Armour Dempwolf was born in 1906. In 1930, John A. Dempwolf married Margie Emig of Emigsville. Their son John Armour Dempwolf, Jr. was born in 1934.

The drawings and a photo of a gathering at the Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm, were donated to the Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Committee, via John A. Dempwolf, Jr. and his wife Beverly. The farm and drawings will be the subject of future posts.

The eastern boundary of the 135-acre Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm ran the whole length of Memory Lane in Springettsbury Township; stretching from frontage along East Market Street to frontage along Whiteford Road.

In 1952, one of the bigger Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm parcels sold was 64-acres to Caterpillar, for a parts distribution center along the west side of Memory Lane; it opened in 1953. At that time it was one of the largest and most modern distribution centers in the United States; using technology such as an automated crane system and computerized inventory management. Still operating, 65-years later, the York Distribution Center is presently a 1.1 million square foot facility.

Via old newspapers, I’ve discovered several neat storylines to go with the 1916 photo of the whole gathering at the Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm; again the subjects of several future posts.

Writing on the back of the photo identifies the individuals. From left, sitting: Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. Schaszberger, Mrs. Charles (Amanda) Herman, Rev. G. W. Enders, D.D.; standing: Mrs. & Mr. Reinhardt Dempwolf, Master John Armour Dempwolf, Miss Annie K. Schaszberger, Peter Z. Kesler, Mr. Jacob T. Kopp, Mrs. & Mr. Mahlon N. Haines.

Assorted Dempwolf links include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Mundis Mill at midpoint of Codorus Navigation

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, the 11-miles of canal and slackwater, via the Codorus Creek, allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River.

Part nine explores Mundis Mill; located at the midpoint of the Codorus Navigation Works. Canal Lock 5 was constructed at the dam utilized by this grist mill; then known as Brillinger’s Mill.

This 2017 photo, submitted by Mike Spyker, shows Mundis Mill at the south end of Route 24, Sherman Street Extended, in East Manchester Township. With the roof failing and attic walls crumbling, a modern roof and attic section was added several years ago to protect the original, greater than 250-year old, stonework structure below; i.e. three full floors plus basement. The ground elevation drops off to the back of the building, allowing outside windows on the lower floor and below that floor there are openings in the basement walls which allow water flow to and from water turbines via head and tail races, respectively. A 1945 photo showing the back of the mill and warehouse appears later in this post.

Click on this LINK for a yorkblog.com Full View of the four original photos/illustrations in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of images, or if they have been removed from the ydr.com site.

Within that yorkblog.com site, the York Daily Record is presently experiencing gremlins which result in messages such as, “Error. Page cannot be displayed. Please contact your service provider for more details.” While the York Daily Record works on correcting this problem, simply close that window; the linked blog page, within yorkblog.com, that you were intending to reach should appear.

Most people refer to this grist mill as Mundis Mill; because Mundis family members were the owners for the longest recent stretch of time. In 1920, William F. Mundis purchased from the Samuel Rudy estate: a tract of 29-acres with a 2-story house, bank barn, grist mill, saw mill, mill races, and mill dam. Following the 1938 death of William Mundis, his son Roy V. Mundis operated the mill for many decades. Roy was followed by John and Barney Mundis. It was during the Mundis ownership that the road paralleling the Mundis Mill head race was named Mundis Race Road; as it is today.

When the Codorus Navigation Works were constructed and for much of the 1800s, members of the Brillinger family were owners of this mill. In 1799, John Brillinger purchased 147-acres, with the mills, etc., from Abraham Landis. The ownership string passed from [the 1799] John Brillinger, to his son Jacob Brillinger in 1823, then to another son [of the 1799 John] John Brillinger in 1832, and finally to his son Jacob Brillinger in 1872.

Beach Nichols 1876 Atlas of York County annotates the road leading from the York and Wrightsville Turnpike (i.e. the present East Market Street, Route 462) to Brillinger’s Mill as Brillinger Road. In terms of present road names, much of Brillinger Road was renamed Mt. Zion Road, except for the stretch renamed North Sherman Street closer to Codorus Creek.

Additional details about Brillinger’s/Mundis Mill and canal Lock 5 are provided following an index to the first eight parts of this series.

The links to the other posts in this series follow:

The following illustration is a visualization of the location of Codorus Navigation Works Dam No. 5 and Lock No. 5 with respect to Brillinger’s Mill. This visualization is via my assessment of the whole of my research, which included historic aerial photos; such as the attached 1937 aerial photo, covering the same area as my 1833 illustration.

Lock 5, in the 1833 illustration, is required to lower, or raise, a canal boat 7-feet height; i.e. 329-feet minus 322-feet; the elevations of the slackwater pools on either side of the lock. Lock 5 is located 5.5-miles, via the Codorus Creek, from the West Market Street landing of the Codorus Navigation Company, and located 5.5-miles from the Susquehanna River; i.e. at the midway point on the Codorus Navigation Works.

The 7-foot high Dam No. 5, near Brillinger’s/Mundis Mill, remained in place until it was removed late in 1945. The Mill began using electricity in 1934; although also used water turbines to power operations until 1945.

These two old photos show the front (north side) and back side of Mundis Mill. Even though tough to identify in this smaller size, the people in the 1936 photo were recorded, from left to right are: William F. Mundis; Paul Rentzel, Manchester; Lloyd Heiges, Hallam; Boyd S. Mundis, Dover; Harold Prowell, York; John Mundis, Mt. Wolf; and Roy V. Mundis.

The lower 1945 photo is a view overlooking the end of the head race, next to the back side of Mundis Mill. This photo, dated September 3, 1945, is from the collections of Grant Voaden; which he donated to the York County History Center. Since the ground elevation drops off sharply from the front of buildings to the back side, the three full floors of the stone mill (on the right) and frame warehouse (on the left) can be seen in this photo. Below the lowest floor in the mill, the semicircular opening in the basement wall is where water flows from the head race into water turbines to power the mill.

For a direct comparison, the following 2015 aerial photo includes the same area as the 1833 illustration and 1937 aerial photo. East Manchester Township is north of the Codorus Creek and Springettsbury Township is south of the creek at this location. Lock No. 5 on the Codorus Navigation Works, would have been due north of Central York High School on the south side of the Codorus Creek.

I commend reader Kay Patterson for making an astute observation. She remembered seeing an article that claimed John Elgar’s steamboat Codorus utilized Codorus Navigation to travel from York to the Susquehanna River, however now realizes that was not possible. Kay commented the author of that article definitely confused the canal boat named Codorus (mentioned in Part 8 of this series) with the earlier (launched in 1825) steamboat also named Codorus. See my first link in the following related posts; the steamboat Codorus was operating as a ferry on North Carolina waterways in 1829; before construction ever started on the Codorus Navigation Works.

Links to related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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More about WWI patriot Jeannette Zinn

The casket containing the body of Jeannette Zinn was flag covered for her funeral and burial in York; ten-weeks after she died overseas while on route for duty with the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe during World War I. Newspapers reported she was to be engaged in Y.M.C.A. war work, although suspicions remain that more was involved.

This post contains more about Jeannette Zinn; from her involvement with her class Yearbook at York High to military type training she received during 1918. Jeannette stands in the photo of the editorial staff, which appeared in “THE CLASSMATE, A History of the Class of 1910 of The York High School.” Seated, left to right, are: Linda Bowers, Vernon Heilman, Editor; and Herbert Metz, Assistant Editor. Standing are: Kenneth Cox, Jeannette Zinn, Paul Kuntz and Riter Porman.

Click on this LINK for a yorkblog.com Full View of the photo in this post if details are cut off in cropping, or if it has been removed from the ydr.com site.

The 1910 York High class history was published locally. It is the forerunner of todays Yearbooks, except with drastically fewer pictures. For example, individual photos of the 81-members of the senior class were not published in the 1910 class history; instead there was one group photo, of the whole class, in front of the school. Besides her involvement with the class history, Jeannette Zinn was the class poet and was often involved in plays. Jeannette graduated with honors, being the valedictorian of her class.

Jeannette was employed by C. H. Bear & Company; rising to become a buyer for Bear’s department store. She also continued amateur theatrical work; having taken part in several benefit plays by the Girl’s Club of York.

When the United States became involved in World War I, Jeannette Zinn was the driving force in organizing a drill squad within of the Girl’s Club of York to expose the women to military type training. Within this drill squad, Jeannette was the leader of a group of women, known as a “battalion of death,” that took this training to another level. A reporter from The Philadelphia Inquirer witnessed this training and wrote in the issue of June 24, 1918:

“A drill squad of more than 100 members has been formed and is drilling two nights a week under direction of Sergeant Joseph J. Wall, recruiting officer for the government in this district, with headquarters in York. These girls are instructed in marching and stationary drills, in rifle practice, in sabre drills and other forms of manual features in which their brother-friends are fast becoming proficient in the various camps throughout the country. A representative of the Inquirer attended a drill of the company recently and was surprised by the proficiency the members exhibited in their work. The members are also organized for hikes, which they take on an average of once a week.”

“The members of the corps are more than anxious to take an active part in the conflict and the formation of a ‘battalion of death’ is now under way. This movement is sponsored by Miss Jeannette Zinn, treasurer of the club, and one of the most active members. She has already enrolled a number of girls. These girls are taking rifle practice and sabre drills more seriously, if possible, than the other members.”

“Aside from the training for active participation in the conflict, the club is also training in other lines. A class in French has been organized and is receiving instruction several times a week under a competent instructor for service as telephone girls with the United States forces in France. These girls are making wonderful progress, and will, within a short time, be able to take their place and do their bit over there.”

Was it this Inquirer article, of June 24, 1918, that first caught the attention of the military? There is still more to come on Jeannette Zinn, as friends continue to conduct an extensive WWI military records search on Jeannette.

Links to related WWI posts:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Premier of Codorus Navigation Works presentation

My presentation Codorus Navigation Works premiered earlier this week at the monthly meeting of the Manchester Township Historical Society. I’ll draw upon that talk, plus further research, as I continue the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River.

Part eight explores the July 4, 1832 opening of the initial phase of the Codorus Navigation Works to Barnitz’s Spring. I use the Canal Towage Company photo in my presentation, to provide a visualization of the appearance of slackwater navigation, as opposed to canal operation. Codorus Navigation utilized both slackwater and traditional canal operation.

Click on this LINK for a yorkblog.com Full View of the two original photos/illustrations in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of images, or if they have been removed from the ydr.com site.

The 1830 to 1836 diary of Dr. Alexander Small records the celebration associated with the opening of the initial phase of the Codorus Navigation Works on July 4, 1832: “July—4. The canal was opened for the first time between York and Barnitz’s Spring. About five hundred persons went from this place [York] on the two canal boats [company boat “Codorus” and private boat “Pioneer”] to the spring, where dinner was provided for them by Mr. Hantz. The Orphean society performed in a handsome manned on board of the company’s boat.”

Additional details are provided following an index to the first seven parts of this series.

The links to the other posts in this series follow:

Newspaper articles indicate Barnitz’s Spring is 3-miles north of the Borough of York. Which is 0.4-miles south of Myers Dam; written about in Part 7 of this series. The location of Barnitz’s Spring would thus be either in Manchester Township south of the present Emig Road or in Springettsbury Township, south of the present Mundis Mill Road; in 1832 that area being Spring Garden Township on the east side of the creek. The exact location of Barnitz’s Spring has always been a mystery to those who have previously written about the Codorus Navigation Company; as it is to me, although I still have some ideas for further research.

The 500 attending the July 4, 1832 celebration to Barnitz’s Spring would have traveled through Locks 1 & 2 at Loucks Mill and Lock 3 at Small’s Dam. This must have been a feature that continued to draw the curious to either pay 25-cents or hire a boat for private excursions to Barnitz’s Spring the remainder of the summer; as advertised in the following 1832 ad:

Links to related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Jeannette Zinn honored on York Fairgrounds tablets

Jeannette Zinn is the only woman honored on the World War I memorial tablets that flank the West Market Street entrance to the York Fairgrounds. These tablets were dedicated October 4, 1921; to memorialize those in York County who “gave their lives in defense of liberty, right and justice.”

Last week I wrote Jeannette Zinn’s name is displayed on both of the two major, all-inclusive, WWI memorials dedicated in York County following WWI. I’ve received numerous queries as to the location of the second memorial. When I respond with “flanking the West Market Street gate into the fairgrounds,” most do not recall seeing those memorial tablets; likely because the tablets are covered with nearly 100-years of grime.

It took several visits, for the lighting to be just right, to obtain acceptable photos of the list of names. Click on this LINK for a yorkblog.com Full View of the photo in this post if details are cut off in cropping, or if it has been removed from the ydr.com site.

I got a surprise when I compared the names on the Fairgrounds WWI tablets to the 197 names on the four WWI panels fronting the columns of the former York County Court House; now the York County Administration Center at 28 East Market Street in York, PA.

There are SEVEN names on the Fairground WWI tablets in addition to the 197 that appear on the Court House WWI panels. Those names are:

Albert D. Bell

Walter B. Dick

Henry F. Emswiler

Charles H. Heaps

Henry Knaub

John Austin McKee

James F. Shuman

Five of these SEVEN veterans appear the book “York County and the World War 1914-1919” by Clifford J. Hall and John P. Lehn. They are in the section devoted to the York County patriots who gave their lives in national service during the World War. Future posts will tell the stories of the SEVEN.

Links to related WWI posts:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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