Susquehanna Trail Association switches in favor of a York Haven route; should York get the Trail

Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement: Part 8

North East section of York County, PA on 1915 State Highway Department Map (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

North East section of York County, PA on 1915 State Highway Department Map (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

Route 250, through York Haven, is highlighted on this State Highway Department map from 1915. In 1918, Route 250 is North George Street in York that heads through Emigsville, Manchester Boro, York Haven Boro, Newberrytown, Lewisberry Boro, Bunches, and New Cumberland prior to entering Harrisburg.

In 1918, the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association visited York on June 12th and Gettysburg on June 13th; to help them decide which city would be the terminus of the southern extension of the Susquehanna Trail. During the York visit, the Board of Governors favored the Dillsburg, Wellsville and Dover route of the Susquehanna Trail, should York get the Trail; although the York Committee was able to convince the Board of Governors to take a peek at their suggested route through York Haven.

Following the visit by the Board, a Harrisburg newspaper was first to reveal the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association had switched in favor of a York Haven route; if York is selected over Gettysburg to get the Trail. This news was reported in the June 17th, 1918, issue of the Harrisburg Telegraph:

Trail Decision Goes Over

Final decision as to the route for the Susquehanna Trail link between York and Harrisburg must wait for a meeting of the Susquehanna Trail Association.

It is certain the Dillsburg-Wellsville, Dover route will not be adopted but indications point to Route No. 250, which takes in Emigsville, Manchester, York Haven, skirts Lewisberry, and then passes through New Cumberland and Lemoyne.

Two days later, the York Daily would have more details; continue reading.

Continue reading “Susquehanna Trail Association switches in favor of a York Haven route; should York get the Trail” »

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RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 18 . . David . . Part 6

RAILCAR GOLD    Chapter 18 . . . David   add 2 blanks after GOLD

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 18 . . . David

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century. This is Part 6 of Chapter 18 . . . David. A new part will be posted every Thursday. Recent chapters stand alone, starting here; however new readers may want to start at the beginning.

Continue reading “RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 18 . . David . . Part 6” »

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500th YorksPast Post & Readers Choose Top 10 Posts during August 2014

Stats2014Aug

YorksPast started with a post on July 26, 2012. Two years and nearly two months later, this marks my 500th post of sharing a hodgepodge of explorations of York’s Past. I’ve learned a lot, via my research, for those posts; I hope my readers enjoyed what I’ve shared along the way.

This chart shows the growth of YorksPast readership in recent months; thanks to my ever-growing legion of loyal readers! August was a breakout month of over 1000 views per day, after floating between 600 and 800 views per day during the earlier months of 2014. A big part the increase was due to the overwhelming popularity of my series of posts on the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement; a series that is continuing on Friday’s for several more weeks.

At the beginning of every month, I’m sharing with my readers the top 10 posts from the previous month. You’re continuing to catch up on reading the past installments of my historical novel, that I post every Thursday; 29 of the top 50 post views were installments of Railcar Gold. These are your favorites during August 2014:

Yt74Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement

We have the Susquehanna Trail road name in York County as a result of the Good Roads Movement in Pennsylvania. This led-off post, in a multi-part series, provides a background on the Good Roads Movement in Pennsylvania and leads up to the establishment of the Susquehanna Trail Association on February 2nd, 1917.

Yt75Bury’s in Springettsbury Township was not just Hamburgers

West of Playland Skating Rink, at 2709, 2710 and 2720 East Market Street, Bury’s had various businesses in Springettsbury Township. Only one of those locations housed Bury’s Famous Hamburgers; learn about the other Bury businesses.

Yt76The Wellsboro Agitator campaigns for the Susquehanna Trail

In the February 28th, 1917 issue of the Wellsboro Agitator, a Susquehanna Trail Association coupon was printed for the public to join the association for $1.00; thereby hoping to sway the Board of Governors of the Association to select a northern route of the Susquehanna Trail through their region.

Yt77Avoiding Sour Beer’s Eddy on a Perilous Voyage from Wrightsville to Peach Bottom

An 1880 engraving likely depicts the type of perilous voyage the York Collegiate students encountered when they hitched a ride on a Susquehanna River lumber raft in 1883.

Yt78The Susquehanna Trail lands York, PA at the Crossroads of PA Routes 1 & 4

Pennsylvania Routes 1 & 4 crossed in York’s Continental Square until the “modern” state route numbering system was implemented throughout the states. PA Route 1 became Route 30 and PA Route 4 became Route 111 over all but the Harrisburg to Sunbury part of the Susquehanna Trail, which became Route 11.

Yt79#15 Wrightsville Hardware Company; top Wrightsville employer in 1899

In 1899, the Wrightsville Hardware Company had been manufacturing hardware and iron novelties for 19-years.  The #15, in the post headline, signifies that in the year 1899, there were only fourteen companies containing a work force of more employees in all of York County.

Yt80The Susquehanna Trail forks at Amity Hall

The Susquehanna Trail forking off, to the right, of the William Penn Highway at Amity Hall.  Between Amity Hall and Harrisburg, the Susquehanna Trail followed the already established William Penn Highway.

Yt81Adventures in a South Seas Paradise

At Palmyra Island lines were fastened around the old PT-boat wharf’s aging bollards, however it became quickly evident that they were unfit to hold the ship.  Hastily the crew wrapped lines around a couple of nearby palm trees, which held.

Yt82The President Lincoln Torpedoed on Return Trip; York sailor KIA

The U.S.S. President Lincoln was the largest U.S. Naval vessel to be lost in the First World War. George B. Hoffman, of York, PA; was among those Killed in Action when the U.S.S. President Lincoln was torpedoed by a German submarine.

Yt83YorksPast begins Third Year; Readers Choose Top 10 Posts during July 2014

In early August, I shared this top 10 list; i.e. the posts with the most page views from my loyal readers, during July 2014.

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association visit to York in 1918

Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement: Part 7

Circa 1913 Postcard of York Motor Club, York, PA (Postcard is Postmarked June 1914 and is from the Collections of S. H. Smith)

Circa 1913 Postcard of York Motor Club, York, PA (Postcard is Postmarked June 1914 and is from the Collections of S. H. Smith)

In 1918, the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association visited York on June 12th and Gettysburg on June 13th; to help them decide which city would be the terminus of the southern extension of the Susquehanna Trail. The York Motor Club, pictured in this postcard, is where the York delegation entertained the Board of Governors during the evening of June 12th, 1918. The Colonial Revival building with massive wrap-around porch still stands along the north side of East Market Street, between North Findlay Street and North Vernon Street, in Springettsbury Township. The building looks virtually the same as it did over 100-years ago in this circa 1913 postcard.

Some automobile owners of York and York County met April 25, 1906.  They formed “The Automobile Association of York County.”  This organization is not to be confused with AAA (American Automobile Association), which established a chapter in York County twenty years later in 1926.

The Automobile Association of York County soon adopted the shorter name “York Motor Club.”  The club promoted good safe roads.  Members shared road trip travel ideas.  The club encouraged camaraderie of car ownership through gatherings and activities. The post 1906 York Automobile Owners form York Motor Club; their Club House still stands contains additional details about this motor club and their club house.

In Part 1 of the Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement, I asked my readers to solve the mystery location of a Susquehanna Trail road sign in York County by identifying the full name of the intersecting road. Nobody has commented with the correct answer following clues: (1) last two words in the road name are given in Part 1, (2) sign is in Manchester Township, (3) the sign is at a “Y” intersection, (4) the “Inn is in the Y,” (5) a Photo Clue in Part 5, and (6) a 1915 highway map, in Part 6, narrowed down the portion of Manchester Township where the mystery road is located. Your seventh clue: the Old Mill operated until 1922, upon which it was initially converted to an Inn.

We have the Susquehanna Trail road name in York County as a result of the Good Roads Movement in Pennsylvania. The Susquehanna Trail Association was established in Williamsport on February 2nd, 1917; it was modeled after the successful nationwide Lincoln Highway Association, founded four years earlier.

Just as with the Lincoln Highway, the Board of Governors of The Susquehanna Trail Association deliberated and made site visits to select the existing road segments that would be part of the Susquehanna Trail. In February 1917, the Board of Governors immediately selected State Route 4, which had existed for several years between Harrisburg and Williamsport, as their first road segment of the Susquehanna Trail; see Part 1. By the fall of 1917, the Board of Governors of The Susquehanna Trail Association selected the route they would champion north from Williamsport to the New York State line; see Part 2.

Running north out of Harrisburg, the Susquehanna Trail (State Route 4) followed the already established William Penn Highway (State Route 3) until it reached Amity Hall, where it branched off, on its own, and followed the Susquehanna River to Williamsport; see Part 3. I explained how PA Route 1 became Route 30 and PA Route 4 became Route 111 over all but the Harrisburg to Sunbury part of the Susquehanna Trail, which became Route 11; see Part 4.

Williamsport favored placing the Susquehanna Trail through Gettysburg over a York Route, however the full Board of Governors would ultimately decide if Gettysburg or York would get the Susquehanna Trail; see Part 5. Yorkers sprung into action to attract the Susquehanna Trail. They planned for the visit by the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association, who favored a York County route through Dillsburg, Wellsville, and Dover. The York Committee planned to propose a better route through Emigsville, Manchester Boro, York Haven Boro, and Newberrytown; see Part 6. For those familiar with the Susquehanna Trail, north of York, you realize that neither of these routes ultimately became the final route of The Trail.

I found it interesting to read about the June 12th visit by the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association from two, slightly different, viewpoints; both Harrisburg and York. The Harrisburg viewpoint is from the June 13th, 1918, issue of the Harrisburg Telegraph, reporting on the Board of Governors visit to York:

York Makes Bid For Spur of the Susquehanna Trail

With the purpose of pushing the claims of York for a place on the route of the Susquehanna Trail, 150 leading men of that city, members of the Chamber of Commerce, Rotary Club, Kiwanis Club, Auto Dealers’ Association, etc., in fifty automobiles yesterday afternoon escorted from Harrisburg to York twenty-five members of the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association together with their wives and daughters.

Last evening these members were the guests of honor at a reception of the York Motor Club. The address of welcome was delivered by Mayor E. S. Hugentugler. Senator Henry Wasbers, member of the York Trail Committee, explained the object of the day’s trip.

The twenty-five governors, all of them coming from towns along the trail north of Harrisburg, came here yesterday for the purpose of selecting a route for the section of the trail from Harrisburg to the Mason and Dixon Line. The trail follows the Susquehanna River from Lawrenceville to this city [Harrisburg].

The York route which passes through Dillsburg, Wellsville, Mount Royal, Dover and Weiglestown, favorably impressed the governors, but no definite decision has yet been reached concerning the route to be finally selected. Today the officials made a trip to Gettysburg to pass over the route which passes through Gettysburg.

As you recall from my post Susquehanna Trail to Tap the Lincoln Highway at either Gettysburg or York; with Dover route Considered, the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association favored a York County route through Dillsburg, Wellsville, and Dover, as I previously depicted in on the following map.

Adams & York County view of 1928 Thayer’s Industrial Map of Pennsylvania (Source: Penn State Map Room; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

Adams & York County view of 1928 Thayer’s Industrial Map of Pennsylvania (Source: Penn State Map Room; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

The York Committee had selected the more direct route through Newberrytown, York Haven Boro, Manchester Boro and Emigsville. The York Committee had gone to a lot of effort to evaluate and mark their route in preparation of showing it off to the Board of Governors. However, evidently the Board of Governors insisted on seeing only the Dillsburg route. Although in conference at the York Motor Club, the York Committee convinced the Board of Governors to take a quick peek at their route, the following morning, prior to the Board of Governors traveling to Gettysburg. This is reported in the June 13th, 1918, issue of The York Daily:

River Trail Is Strategic Route Says Former Senator Merrick At Motor Club Meeting—Governors Here

DEFER ROUTE SELECTION

No selection of the route through this section of the state was made by the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association, who were entertained yesterday by the York County Committee interested in locating the trail through this city. The trail officers were met at Harrisburg by the party of Yorkers, but the return to the city was made by the way of Dillsburg, instead of over route No. 250, as intended. An inspection of the proposed trail through this section, over both state highway No. 250, and No. 333, will be made by the officers of the trail and the York Committee.

At the Motor Club, last evening, where the visitors were entertained at dinner, W. T. Merrick, who was one of the speakers stated that York was on the shortest route to Washington, the southern terminus of the trail. He also pointed out the strategic importance from a military point of view of such a road as the proposed Susquehanna Trail.

It will commence at the New York state line, where it will meet the Mohawk Trail, leading direct to the great lakes. The trail has been located definitely southward as far as Harrisburg, from which point the route remains to be determined.

The York party made up a train of 50 automobiles and left shortly after noon. The automobiles on the north side of East Market Street and each car was numbered and supplied with a banner, reading, “Boost the Susquehanna Trail,” while the delegates occupying the automobiles wore badges. They arrived in Harrisburg at 3 p.m., by way of the proposed trail from York, and met the Williamsport delegation, which included the following:

  • Dr. and Mrs. Charles T. Aikens, Selinsgrove
  • Mr. and Mrs. Max L. Lindheimer, Willamsport
  • Former State Senator and Mrs. W. T. Merrick, Wellsboro
  • Mr. and Mrs. Vosburg, Mansfield
  • James T. Snyder, Blossburg
  • Mr. and Mrs. William Decker, Montgomery
  • William Field Shay, Watsontown
  • Robert Rombach, Sunbury
  • Dr. H. R. Wnitmer, Liverpool
  • John E. Person, of the Sun, Williamsport.

The trail governors left Williamsport yesterday morning at 9 o’clock. Six automobiles conveyed the party. They arrived in Harrisburg at 1:30 o’clock and had dinner at the Senate.

After the Yorkers had also had dinner the entire party left the capital at 4 p.m. on the return trip to this city [York]. Having decided upon the best road regardless of the distance of the route by way of Dillsburg and Wellsville was selected.

Supper At Motor Club

The party arrived in the city at 6 p.m. and proceeded to the Motor Club on the Wrightsville Pike, where supper was served. The guests were welcomed by Mayor E. S. Hugentugler, and Senator Henry Wasbers. The response was made by Dr. Aikens, president of the trail association.

The Board of Governors of the trail association and the York Committee held a conference, at which it was decided to go over the two trail routes today, selected by the local committee. The decision by the Board of Governors of their choice of route will be made later.

A dance was held for the guests, the music being furnished by Percy Hall’s Jazz Band.

The visitors during their stay in the city are guests at the Colonial Hotel. Upon their return today from the inspection of the trail route through this county, they will proceed to Gettysburg.

In addition to the trail governors and their wives, the party of visitors included:

  • Mr. and Mrs. Frank Snyder
  • Mr. and Mrs. Simon Schloss and son
  • Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence H. Ulman
  • Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Perley
  • Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Rohrbaugh
  • Mr. and Mrs. N. Gulley Finch
  • Mr. and Mrs. B. Person

The automobiles for the York party were furnished by the following:

  • Anderson Motor Car Company, 2
  • Max Grumbacher
  • Franklin Auto Company
  • L. Edward Herr
  • Dr. G. E. Spotz
  • Urban S. Bond
  • James W. Neuman
  • Edward W. Neuman
  • J. W. Richley Automobile Company, 2
  • Harrisburg-Overland Company
  • York Garage & Supply Company
  • Ambrose B. Strickler
  • Harry S. Ebert
  • Snyder Automobile Company
  • Arthur E. Lehman
  • N. H. Forry
  • E. A. Clark was the pilot.

This article gives a clue of the influential person that will champion the York cause on the Board of Governors. Former State Senator Walter T. Merrick, from Wellsboro, home of the Wellsboro Agitator, a town north of Williamspost in Tioga County; however not directly on the Susquehanna Trail. Merrick is already talking about extending the southern terminus of the Susquehanna Trail to Washington D.C. He points out the strategic importance, from a military point of view, of such a route for the proposed Susquehanna Trail passing through the industrial cities of York and Baltimore. Remember, in June of 1918, the United States is still involved in World War I.

To be continued . . . next Friday in Part 8.

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 18 . . David . . Part 5

RAILCAR GOLD    Chapter 18 . . . David   add 2 blanks after GOLD

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 18 . . . David

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century. This is Part 5 of Chapter 18 . . . David. A new part will be posted every Thursday. Recent chapters stand alone, starting here; however new readers may want to start at the beginning.

Continue reading “RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 18 . . David . . Part 5” »

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College Football Games were played on the York Fairgrounds during the York Fair

Football at York Collegiate Institute; predecessor to York College

Postcard of York Fairgrounds Race Track [very late 1800s or very early 1900s] (From Postcard Collection of S. H. Smith)

Postcard of York Fairgrounds Race Track [very late 1800s or very early 1900s] (From Postcard Collection of S. H. Smith)

In 1888, the York County Agricultural Society moved the York Fairgrounds from their East King Street site to their present York Fair/York Expo Center property, west of York. This postcard contains a westward looking view of the present York Fairgrounds race track during the very late 1800s or very early 1900s; in the years prior to the construction of the Grandstand Stage. During that time, the infield of the half-mile race track was occasionally used for football games during the Fair.

The following article appears in the Thursday, October 5th, 1899, issue of The York Daily. This early sports article gives details about the College Football Game played between Dickinson College Reserves and the York Collegiate Institute teams on Wednesday morning at the York Fairgrounds during the York Fair. For easier reading, I’ve transcribed everything, following the original article:

FairFootballAFairFootballB

A not very interesting game of football was played on the fair grounds yesterday morning, between the Dickinson College Reserves and the York Collegiate Institute teams. The boys lined up at 10 o’clock and it was very evident that the Institute was far outweighed. The first half went off with a rush, and for a time honors were about even. The Dickinson men made good gains through the line, but when they tried the ends they were stopped by the fine tackling of both Jessop and Yost. With only 10 seconds to play Dickinson got the ball over the first touch-down but failed to kick the goal.

In the second half our boys weakened and the weight of their opponents began to tell. Wareheim and Yost, of the Institute, were both injured so that they had to be taken out. Wooster finally got through for a long run and a touchdown. The playing of the Institute boys from here out was decidedly ragged, although they showed pluck to the end and kept their opponents down to two more touch-downs.

The Dickson team had good interference and had no difficulty in gaining with the guards back formation.

The line-up was as follows:

  • Y.C.I.                                        D.C.R.
  • Jessop . . . . . left end . . . . . Schuman.
  • Fisher . . . . . left tackle . . . . Johnson.
  • Dise . . . . . . . left guard . . . . . Sloan.
  • E. Myers . . . . centre . . . . . . Gillespie.
  • D. Myers . . . . right guard . . . . Hoke.
  • Wareheim . . . right tackle . . . . Brooks.
  • Yost . . . . . . . . right end . . . . . . . Smith.
  • Cook . . . . . . . . quarter . . . . . . . . Wood.
  • Kennard . . . . left half-back . . . . Wooster.
  • Garrison . . . . right half-back . . . . Arthur.
  • Eyster . . . . . . . . full-back . . . . . . . . Norris.

Touthdowns—Smith 2, Woolsey 2. Goals—Wood 2. Dickinson 22, Y.C.I. 0, Umpire—W. J. Rothermel. Timers—Samuel K. McCall and J. Howard Manifold. Linesmen—Wm. Mullholland and Edw. W. Spangler.

The Intercollegiate Football scoring rules for 1899, awarded 5 points for a touchdown, 1 point for successfully kicking the goal following a touchdown, and 2 points for a safety. Resulting in the score of 22 for Dickinson; i.e. 4 touchdowns and 2 successful kicking the goal following touchdowns.

The following are a few early college football milestones, from my post George S. Billmeyer; All American Football Player in 1869. In 1880, the number of players on the field, from each team, was lowered to 11; as we have today.  In 1882, the rule of using yards and downs was added; requiring a team to make 5 yards in 3 downs. In 1906 the forward pass was legalized; 37 years after the first college football game!  And it took until 1912 for the rules refinement to the present system we now have: 4 downs to make 10 yards.

The following article from the December 3rd, 1903, issue of The York Daily provided a glimpse into the football teams of the York Collegiate Institute.

FairFootballCThe Athletic Association of the York Collegiate Institute met Tuesday after school in the afternoon. Manager Logan of the foot-ball team made his report, which was far above the expectations of the association. The association decided to make a trophy room out of the present music room on the third floor, putting the pictures of the foot-ball teams for the past ten years on the wall with the foot-balls encased in the centre of the room.

A meeting of the foot-ball team of the York Collegiate Institute was called Tuesday to elect a captain and a manager for the next year’s team. Katz was elected as captain, while Logan was ushered to the managers chair.

The article implies that football started at the York Collegiate Institute about 1893. Carol McCleary Innerst included a photo of the 1902 Y.C.I. football team on page 79 of her book: York College of Pennsylvania, in The Campus History Series. Quoting two lines from that photo caption:

YCI dropped football either after the 1905 season or the 1912 season when the coaches decided that the boys were too light and inexperienced to withstand the “buffeting” received in games. YCI apparently did not field a team again until the 1920s.

Also on page 79, the caption on a 1899 photo of the YCI Athletic Association reveals the likely given names, or initial, of a few of the football players from the 1899 game:

  • Joseph Fisher . . . . left tackle
  • E. Myers  . . . . . . . . centre
  • D. Myers . . . . . . . . right guard
  • Fred Yost . . . . . . . right end
  • H. Kennard . . . . . . left half-back
  • R. Garrison . . . . . right half-back

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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75 Years Ago, Joe Bury sells Four and a Half TONS of Hamburgers at the York Fair

Article in October 10, 1939 issue of The Gazette and Daily (Newspaper Microfilms of York County Heritage Trust)

Article in October 10, 1939 issue of The Gazette and Daily (Newspaper Microfilms of York County Heritage Trust)

At the completion of the 1939 York Fair, The Gazette and Daily reported:

Joe Bury rightfully deserves the title of York’s hamburg king. A total of 44,750 hamburgers crossed the counter at his stand on the fair grounds last week. He disposed of 8,950 pounds of hamburg, almost four and a half tons, and 3,600 pounds more than was sold at the 1938 fair.

The title of the article, “Wimpy Must Have Been At The Fair,” refers to Popeye’s side-kick Wimpy. Wimpy loves to eat hamburgers and is usually seen carrying one or eating mass quantities at a time, however, he is usually too cheap to pay for them himself. A recurring bit, in the comic strip, involves Wimpy’s attempts to con other patrons of the diner into buying him hamburgers. Wimpy’s character started to use his best-known catchphrase in 1932; “I’ll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today”.

To make Bury’s feat even more astonishing, in 1939 the York Fair only ran 5 days and 5 nights; Tuesday through Saturday. Two paragraphs from The Gazette and Daily report on “Getting Grounds Ready For Fair” follow from their September 23, 1939 issue:

Buildings and grounds on the York Interstate Fair grounds are being put into shape for the opening of the fair, October 3, to operate day and night to Saturday, October 7, inclusive.

Elton Kohr, frozen custard dealer; Joe Bury, the hamburger man, and Fred Bierman, operator of the large restaurant on the grounds, are again preparing to serve patrons during Fair week.

“Strange As It Seems”

Ripley’s “Believe It Or Not”

During the 1940 York Fair the October 5, 1940 issue of The Gazette and Daily reported:

Bury’s Hamburg’s New Record

Yesterday [Friday] Joe Bury’s hamburg stand reached its record of last year, consuming to date 8,950 pounds of hamburg since the opening of the fair. There is still one more day to go and managers of the stand are hoping that this achievement will be written up in Ripley’s “Believe It Or Not” column, which is internationally known. The Bury hamburgs did succeed in getting a write-up in the “Strange As It Seems” column authorized by John Hix. This was in 1938, when 5,473 pounds of hamburg had been used.

I searched for a Bury’s mention in Ripley’s “Believe It Or Not” and did not find one, however most of Ripley’s columns do not appear to be indexed. Nevertheless, the new record amount of hamburg that Joe Bury sold at the 5-day 1940 York Fair totaled 12,200 pounds; 6.1 TONS.

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Yorkers spring into action To Attract the Susquehanna Trail

Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement: Part 6

1917 Library of Congress image (Annotated with a York Daily quote; Arrangement by S. H. Smith, 2014)

1917 Library of Congress image (Annotated with a York Daily quote; Arrangement by S. H. Smith, 2014)

On June 12th, 1918, a 150-member York delegation, in 34 cars, would caravan to Harrisburg to escort the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association back to York. The rules for the caravan: “The drivers will draw for place in line and there will be no racing.” I selected this image from the Library of Congress, since, in 1918, the caravan was traveling on a dirt road to Harrisburg. The Board of Governors visited York on June 12th and Gettysburg on June 13th; to help them decide which city would be the terminus of the southern extension of the Susquehanna Trail.

In Part 1 of the Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement, I asked my readers to solve the mystery location of a Susquehanna Trail road sign in York County by identifying the full name of the intersecting road. Nobody has commented with the correct answer following clues: (1) last two words in the road name are given in Part 1, (2) sign is in Manchester Township, (3) the sign is at a “Y” intersection, (4) the “Inn is in the Y” and (5) a Photo Clue in Part 5.  This post contains a 1915 highway map, where only a small portion of Manchester Township is showing (teal colored and immediately below the Manchester Boro label) ; the mystery road falls within that part of Manchester Township.

We have the Susquehanna Trail road name in York County as a result of the Good Roads Movement in Pennsylvania. The Susquehanna Trail Association was established in Williamsport on February 2nd, 1917; it was modeled after the successful nationwide Lincoln Highway Association, founded four years earlier.

Just as with the Lincoln Highway, the Board of Governors of The Susquehanna Trail Association deliberated and made site visits to select the existing road segments that would be part of the Susquehanna Trail. In February 1917, the Board of Governors immediately selected State Route 4, which had existed for several years between Harrisburg and Williamsport, as their first road segment of the Susquehanna Trail; see Part 1. By the fall of 1917, the Board of Governors of The Susquehanna Trail Association selected the route they would champion north from Williamsport to the New York State line; see Part 2.

Running north out of Harrisburg, the Susquehanna Trail (State Route 4) followed the already established William Penn Highway (State Route 3) until it reached Amity Hall, where it branched off, on its own, and followed the Susquehanna River to Williamsport; see Part 3. I explained how PA Route 1 became Route 30 and PA Route 4 became Route 111 over all but the Harrisburg to Sunbury part of the Susquehanna Trail, which became Route 11; see Part 4. Williamsport favored placing the Susquehanna Trail through Gettysburg over a York Route, however the full Board of Governors would ultimately decide if Gettysburg or York would get the Susquehanna Trail; see Part 5.

Yorkers sprung into action to attract the Susquehanna Trail. The May 21st, 1918, issue of the York Daily reported on their planning:

Campaign to put York on Susquehanna Trail

Civic Organizations form Committee to have route pass through City; will entertain Board of Governors at Motor Club on June 12.

The movement to have the proposed Susquehanna Trail pass through this city was given considerable impetus at a meeting held last night in the rooms of the Chamber of Commerce, in the Lehmayer Building, East Market Street, with representatives of the Rotary Club, the Kiwanis Club, the York Motor Club, the York County Auto Dealers’ Association, and the Chamber of Commerce. A York-Susquehanna Trail Committee was organized, Henry Wasbers being elected chairman, and Eugene F. Weiser, secretary.

The proposed course of the Susquehanna Trail extends from Lawrenceville [at the New York state line] along the Susquehanna River into Harrisburg. The next point will be either York or Gettysburg, where the trail would meet the Lincoln Highway. On June 12, the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail, 15 in number, will arrive in Harrisburg. It is proposed to take a large delegation of Yorkers to the capital to meet the Board of Governors of the trail and bring them to York, where an entertainment will be provided for them in the evening at the York Motor Club. The following morning the Board of Governors of the trail and a delegation of Yorkers will visit Gettysburg.

On next Tuesday an inspection tour of state highway No. 250, between York to Harrisburg, via York Haven, which is recommended for the section of the trail, will be made by the York committee. The distance is 29 miles. The cars which will participate in the inspection trip will be attractively decorated. Later signs will be tacked up marking the trail.

The following committees were appointed:

Entertainment at York Motor Club—William Ilgenfritz, chairman; Arthur E. Lehman and Robert S. Frey.

Advertising—L. Edward Herr, chairman; William Richley, Arthur E. Lehman, William Ilgenfritz, R. P. Anderson.

Finance—Harry S. Ebert, chairman; Dr. George Emanuel Spotz, Henry Wasbers, William Ilgenfritz, J. W. Richley.

Entertainment for Harrisburg reception—Henry Wasbers, William Richley, Arthur Lehman.

I’ve highlighted York County Route 250 on the following State Highway Department map from 1915. In 1918, Route 250 is North George Street in York that heads through Emigsville, Manchester Boro, York Haven Boro, Newberrytown, Lewisberry Boro, Bunches, and New Cumberland prior to entering Harrisburg.

North East section of York County, PA on 1915 State Highway Department Map (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

North East section of York County, PA on 1915 State Highway Department Map (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

The York Committee is proposing a route that runs counter to the York County route floated by the Board of Governors; i.e. through Dillsburg, Wellsville, and Dover. You’ll learn how the Board of Governors reacted to that in next Friday’s installment.

The final plans for the June 12th visit by the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association were published in the June 4th, 1918, issue of the York Daily:

Plan Reception to Trail Board

Committee arranges for Entertainment of The Susquehanna Road Governors

Change Made in Route

Final plans for the entertainment of the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association, on Wednesday, June 12, were made at a meeting last night, in the rooms of the Chamber of Commerce, of the committee representing the York Rotary Club, Kiwanis Club, York Motor Club, York Automobile Dealers’ Association, and the Chamber of Commerce.

The visitors will be met at Harrisburg by a delegation of citizens and escorted to York, where they will be entertained at the York Motor Club.

The members of the local committee will provide automobiles and the parties who will make up the escort for the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association who will be accompanied by their wives. The York delegation is expected to number about 150 and about 34 cars will be required. The party will leave the rooms of the Chamber of Commerce at 12:20 p.m. The drivers will draw for place in line and there will be no racing. The Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association will be met at 3 o’clock at the Hotel Senate, Harrisburg, and escorted to York. Supper will be furnished at the York Motor Club at 5:30 p.m., after which the strangers will be shown around the city. They will be taken to the Colonial Hotel for the night, and will leave the next morning for Gettysburg. The committee in charge of the Harrisburg trip is composed of Charles Snyder, Dr. G. Emanuel Spotz and Harry Schroeder.

A lot of literature from the Susquehanna Trail Association was distributed. The inspection trip over the proposed route of the Susquehanna Trail through York County last Tuesday was discussed and a change in the route was agreed upon. It is now proposed to run the trail from York over Route No. 250 to Newberrytown, then over Route No. 333, through Yocumtown and New Cumberland to Harrisburg. A committee will be sent to place signs along this route before Wednesday, June 12, the date of the proposed trip of the Board of Governors of the trail association. State Senator Harry Wasbers presided at the meeting.

To be continued . . . next Friday in Part 7.

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 18 . . David . . Part 4

RAILCAR GOLD    Chapter 18 . . . David   add 2 blanks after GOLD

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 18 . . . David

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century. This is Part 4 of Chapter 18 . . . David. A new part will be posted every Thursday. Recent chapters stand alone, starting here; however new readers may want to start at the beginning.

Continue reading “RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 18 . . David . . Part 4” »

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Birds Eye View of Original York Fairgrounds Site

Location of York, PA Fairgrounds (1856-1888), Superimposed on 2014 Bing.com SOUTH LOOKING Birds-Eye View (Arrangement by S. H. Smith, 2014)

Location of York, PA Fairgrounds (1856-1888), Superimposed on 2014 Bing.com SOUTH LOOKING Birds-Eye View (Arrangement by S. H. Smith, 2014)

As a result of my post York Fair Grounds Particulars from 1877, I received a request to determine approximately where the track and buildings were located on terms of present York streets. I’ve marked-up a 2014 Bing.com SOUTH LOOKING Birds-Eye View to indicate the extent of the original (1856-1888) York Fairgrounds. I’ve also over-sketched the approximate location of the race track.

The Authentic General Directory of the Boroughs of York, Hanover & Wrightsville in York County, PA was published for 1877 by Herman & Miller and Thomas in York, PA. The directory contains a sketch of the Grounds of the York County Agricultural Society, which IFai’ve blown up into two sections; a West Side view and an East Side view, with the direction of these views noted on the Birds-Eye Aerial View.

Grounds of the York County Agricultural Society (1877 Directory of the Boroughs of York, Hanover & Wrightsville in York County, PA by Herman & Miller and Thomas in York, PA; from collections of York County Heritage Trust. Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

Grounds of the York County Agricultural Society (1877 Directory of the Boroughs of York, Hanover & Wrightsville in York County, PA by Herman & Miller and Thomas in York, PA; from collections of York County Heritage Trust. Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

The fairgrounds Entrance, at the corner of East King Street and Fair Avenue was attached to a two-story brick building; it was used as the judges’ hall, ticket office, etc. An Exhibition Building was frame and built in the shape of a Greek cross; that building would have been located in the vicinity of the present South Pine Street, between East Princess and East Prospect Streets.

The approximate location of the 1/3rd-mile Track is over-sketched on the Birds-Eye Aerial View. The front-stretch basically parallels East Princess Street and the back-stretch basically parallels Forry Avenue. The 1877 illustration shows a short-straight-stretch after the first turn, near the east-end of the fairgrounds. The Grand Stand would have been located about on the south-side of present East Princess Street. Around all sides of the fairgrounds, except East King Street were the live stock stalls.

The Managers of the Orphans’ Home operated a Dining Room in a frame building, which would have been located just east of the Exhibition Building and south of the Grand Stand. That location is approximately between present East Locust Street and Poplar Avenue. Here fair visitors could obtain their meals, with the proceeds going to the Orphans’ Home.

I’ve transferred the fairgrounds boundaries onto the following 2014 Google Street Map of York, PA as a reference to all the streets in the vicinity of the Original York Fairgrounds Site.

2014 Google Street Map of York, PA (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

2014 Google Street Map of York, PA (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

The York Fairgrounds were in existence at this location from 1856 until 1888. In 1888, the York County Agricultural Society moved the Fair Grounds to the site, which is the present York Fair/York Expo Center property, west of York.

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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