Merry Christmas; say it with Poinsettias

Poinsettias2014

GazetteDaily1934Eighty years ago, an article appeared in The Gazette and Daily; “Poinsettia Now Christmas Flower.” The article was reporting on a bulletin published in Washington, D.C. by the National Geographic Society.

The article notes, “Because its red and green are Christmas colors, and because it generally blossoms around Christmastime, the poinsettia has come to be accepted as America’s Christmas flower.” The article points out, the poinsettia is a relatively recently discovery. The Gazette and Daily quoted from the National Geographic Society bulletin:

Discovered in Mexico

As a recognized flower, the poinsettia has a relatively brief history. It first came to the attention of the scientific world in 1828, when Joel Robert Poinsett, American minister to Mexico from 1825-29, noticed the striking beauty of its scarlet and green head, and the fact that it usually came into blossom about Christmastime.

Poinsett, who was a botanist as well as a diplomat, brought several specimens back with him to this country, and fellow scientists soon learned that the flower would thrive in sub-tropical parts of the United States. Poinsett, a South Carolinian, collected many natural history specimens during his travels and work in foreign countries, presenting most of them to scientific societies in the United States, and enriching the flora of his own colorful South Carolina. Today, however, he is remembered chiefly for this Christmas flower, which bears his name.

PoinsettiasYork

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 21 . . Weddings . . Part 1

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 21 . . . Weddings add 2 blanks after GOLD

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 21 . . . Weddings

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century. This is Part 1 of Chapter 21 . . . Weddings. A new part will be posted every Thursday. Recent chapters stand alone, starting here; however new readers may want to start at the beginning.

Continue reading “RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 21 . . Weddings . . Part 1” »

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#13 Hanover Match Company; largest employer in Hanover during 1899

Hanover Match Company during July 1896; on Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of Hanover, PA (Penn State Libraries on-line digital collection of older Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps)

Hanover Match Company during July 1896; on Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of Hanover, PA (Penn State Libraries on-line digital collection of older Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps)

At #13 in the count down of the Top 50 York County Factories at End of 19th Century is the Hanover Match Company in Hanover, PA. The 10th Factory Inspection Report, from the Pennsylvania Department of Factory Inspection, notes that on July 13th 1899, the Hanover Match Company has 143 employees; 31 male and 112 female. Of these 143 employees, 75 employees were under 21-years-old, of which 4 male employees and 12 female employees were between 13 and 16-years-old. The goods manufactured are recorded as “Matches.”

During 1899, the Hanover Match Company is the largest factory employer in Hanover and 13th largest overall in York County. Other Hanover factories that appeared in the top 50 included: #33 Hanover Silk Company, #39 A. F. Hostetter Cigar Factory, #45 Penn Heel & Innersole Factory and #47 Charles P. Ketterer Wagon Factory.

Polk’s York City and County Directory of 1898 (page 544) lists the Hanover Match Company as the only match company in York County. The company is located at 438 Middle Street in Hanover. This site is located on the southwest corner of East Middle Street and the railroad tracks.

The manufacturing operations performed in the various factory buildings of the Hanover Match Company are detailed in a July 1896, Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of Hanover, PA. Penn State Libraries has many of the older Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps available on-line at this link.

HanoverMatchesThe product flow, for producing a box of wooden matches, begins in the upper left buildings where wood is cut and split into individual sticks. The manufacturing operations results in an eastward product flow, through the various buildings: drying the sticks, dipping the ends of the sticks into the chemicals, drying the matches and finishing in the building adjacent to Middle Street where the matches are packed and boxed.

Martin Moul started making matches in Hanover during 1889; having developed several very useful machines for the manufacture of matches. Martin Moul was one of four men that founded the Association of Hanover Match Company, Limited. This partnership was formed February 2nd, 1891; by Martin Moul, Edward H. Moul, William Warner and Josiah Moul (Deed Book 9A-63). Martin Moul owned 85% of the stock in the partnership and the other investors owned 5% each. At the time, Martin Moul was the Treasurer and Superintendent of the company. The partnership was formed in hopes of attracting additional investors, to grow the business.

In 1892, the Hanover Match Company partnership attracted a major investor, P. H. Glatfelter, along with his new son-in-law Charles E. Moul. Their investment in the partnership resulted in the growth of the factory to the size seen on the 1896 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map.

The American Machinist, issue of July 28, 1898, notes the capacity of the Hanover Match Company factory is to be doubled again. The Gettysburg Compiler, issue of August 2, 1898, notes the factory has been running at its full capacity, employing 340 persons; which is the reason the large addition is to be built at once.

The Hanover Match Company factory employed 340 persons in 1898. The factory addition, doubling its size, was completed by early 1899 or was never started; depending on what source you want to believe. The question is: Why were only 143 persons employed during July 1899? Negotiations began to sell the Hanover Match Company to the Diamond Match Company, at some point after the announcement was made about the factory addition. When it became clear that Diamond Match Company had no intention of utilizing the Hanover factory, the level of employment was lowered accordingly.

Continue reading for additional details about Hanover’s loss of their Match Company and learn what manufactured product sprung up in its place. Hint, it has a round about connection to a Christmas Eve factory whistle concert.

Continue reading “#13 Hanover Match Company; largest employer in Hanover during 1899” »

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Pinpointing the Four Mills in Stony Brook

Location of the Four Mills in Stony Brook, Springettsbury Township, York County, PA [2014 Bing.com Aerial Photo; Mill Location Annotation by S. H. Smith, 2014]

Location of the Four Mills in Stony Brook, Springettsbury Township, York County, PA [2014 Bing.com Aerial Photo; Mill Location Annotation by S. H. Smith, 2014]

Several readers requested a map locating the four mills in Stony Brook; specifically in relationship to the surroundings of today. I thought the best way to honor the request is a 2014 Bing.com Aerial Photo, where I’ve noted the location of each of the four mills.

The two water powered grist mills no longer stand. Hauser’s Grist Mill [1] was torn down by 1920, and Stonybrook (Hiestand’s) Grist Mill [2] was torn down in 1972.

The two mills [3] & [4], that began as mill warehouses, still stand. These warehouses eventually evolved into steam engine powered mills, or possibly went directly to utilizing electric motors to power the mill shafts, gearing, and mill equipment.

I’ve shown the head race and tail race locations for the [2] Stonybrook (Hiestand’s) Grist Mill, based upon Grant Voaden research and examination of early maps; both general and topographic. The water source for mill [2] is the tributary of Stony Run that originates in Windsor Township and flows north, emptying into the main branch of Stony Run.

The head race and tail race locations for the [1] Hauser’s Grist Mill are a bit more mysterious. Stony Run originates in Rocky Ridge Park and flows south, eventually crossing East Market Street just east of the Locust Grove Road intersection. In the field east of Locust Grove Road, the creek beds of Stony Run and its Tributary are well defined in 2014.

The following Stony Brook section of the 1876 Atlas of York County, indicates [1] Hauser’s Grist Mill was primarily using water from the main branch Stony Run, while augmenting it with water flow from the Tributary of Stony Run. On this 1876 map, three of the Stony Brook mills are shown.

Location of the Mills in Stony Brook, Springettsbury Township, York County, PA [1876 Atlas of York Co., PA by Beach Nichols (Plate 67); Mill Location Annotation by S. H. Smith, 2014]

Location of the Mills in Stony Brook, Springettsbury Township, York County, PA [1876 Atlas of York Co., PA by Beach Nichols (Plate 67); Mill Location Annotation by S. H. Smith, 2014]

The fourth Stony Brook mill; initially the [4] Hauser Mill Warehouse, next to the [Ettline] House, was not yet built when the 1876 map was surveyed. During October 1875, Henry C. Hauser obtains the 105-acre homestead property of his deceased older brother John H. Hauser. Sometime thereafter, Henry C. Hauser builds the Victorian house, now at 3790 East Market Street, and his mill warehouse, now at 3780 East Market Street.

The extent of the 105-acres, that Henry C. Hauser obtains during October 1875, is shown as yellow shading on the following 1937 Aerial Photo. At the 1875 time of acquisition, the only buildings on this yellowed acreage are centered in the area of the Homestead Farm. Henry Hauser, having previously resided along the north side of East Market Street, likely built the Victorian house and mill warehouse at the Market Street end of the farm lane that housed his newly acquired Grist Mill.

Penn Pilot Aerial Photo of 9/15/1937 [Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2013]

Penn Pilot Aerial Photo of 9/15/1937 [Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2013]

Within old newspaper articles, family histories and other books, I’ve seen every one of these mills occasionally referred to as Stony Brook Mill or Stonybrook Mill; in addition to a host of other names. In many cases the name Stonybrook Mill simply means this is a mill in (or near) Stony Brook. If your confused, join the party, because whenever I read a reference to Stony Brook Mill, I have to mentally sort out, to which of the four the writer was referring. Here is a summary:

[1] Hauser’s water powered Grist Mill was located off the beaten path, in a field east of Stonybrook—this was an early water powered mill in the area; on a few instances I’ve seen it called Stony Brook Mill, however no remains of that mill existed after 1920. Grant Voaden reference GV-19.

[2] Hiestand’s water powered Grist Mill (this was Glatz Grist Mill in 1860, Hiestand’s Grist Mill over most of its working life, and simply Stony Brook Mill, to locals, at the end and after its useful life). It was located near the west side of Locust Grove Road; next to where a tributary of Stony Run crosses Locust Grove Road (this is heading south out of Stony Brook and is before reaching Eastern Boulevard). Grant Voaden reference GV-18. This mill stood until 1972. This mill still had a big wooden water wheel (non-working) when I explored it in the mid-1960s. The boys gave me that guided tour, after delivering a package from Kinard’s Store to the house back to the right of the brick mill building. The artwork by Cliff Satterthwaite captures this mill in splendid detail; see part 1, part 2 and part 3. The following are comments by Cliff Satterthwaite, from one of his e-mails about the Stonybrook Mill artwork:

One of my first encounters with the mill was to ask permission to draw it.  The old brick house to the upper right, I figured, was the “mill keepers” home. The miller had passed away leaving the elderly wife and her no fur, eczema dog. She kindly granted my request to draw different views of what seemed to me as “time joyfully standing still!”

She let me “rescue” a small flutter wheel that was part of the gearing process. The wooden hand made nail bucket (in the painting) most likely was tossed out with the demolition of a Treasured Part of History ….. The Stoneybrook Mill!!

I did ask The York Historical Society to investigate and “find ways to rescue it”, but no “practical way” was found.

[3] Waser’s Mill (3755 E. Market Street); also called Stony Brook Mill. I have a 1924 receipt with Stony Brook Mill imprinted at the top and signed by M. F. Waser; the mill proprietor. This mill is located on the north side of East Market Street and is just west of the railroad tracks, where the former concrete bridge once stood. This was a non-water powered mill that produced flour and feed mixes. The mill building presently houses AMEREX, who install replacement windows, vinyl siding and exterior doors.

[4] Hauser’s Mill (3780 E. Market Street) began as a mill warehouse and housed Kreutz Creek Valley Farmers Co-Op after 1918. Among other things, the Co-Op did custom grinding and mixing of feeds, within their non-water powered mill. Again, I’ve seen references to this mill as Stony Brook Mill; although the writers were likely only making reference to this mill being in Stony Brook. This mill building is located next to the well-known Ettline Antiques properties on the south side of East Market Street and is just east of the railroad tracks. The mill building previously housed The Framers & Framers’ Gallery for many years. A new owner of the mill building is retaining existing elements of original construction throughout the structure; details in a future post.

I’ll be adding posts, with more details on each of these four mills, so readers can more clearly distinguish them from one another. For now, here are related links:

Hauser’s water powered Grist Mill

Hiestand’s water powered Grist Mill

Waser’s (3755 E. Market St.); Stony Brook Mill

Hauser’s (3780 E. Market St.); Kreutz Creek Valley Farmers Co-Op

Assorted related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Susquehanna Trail through York County; Wrap-Up

Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement: Part 19

Bridge over the Yellow Breeches Creek looking southward towards Old York Road—The Susquehanna Trail entrance into York County (2014 Photo, S. H. Smith)

Bridge over the Yellow Breeches Creek looking southward towards Old York Road—The Susquehanna Trail entrance into York County (2014 Photo, S. H. Smith)

Just in time for Christmas, this post wraps-up the 19-part-series on the Susquehanna Trail. Thanks to my readers for the feedback and all the great comments along the journey. Several readers asked the question, “When driving from Harrisburg to the Maryland Line, what roads need to be taken today to retrace the route of the original Susquehanna Trail?”

Front Street in Harrisburg and the following route to York County was the Susquehanna Trail. Travel south on Front Street until making a right turn onto the Market Street Bridge. Cross the Susquehanna River by proceeding west on the Market Street Bridge and then west through Lemoyne on Market Street until reaching 3rd Street. Turn left on 3rd Street, which becomes Bridge Street in New Cumberland.

The southern end of Bridge Street in New Cumberland is the scene shown in the photo where a Susquehanna Trail marker is superimposed. This bridge over the Yellow Breeches Creek, frames Old York Road—the northern Susquehanna Trail entrance into York County.

Today, the original Susquehanna Trail route within York County goes by several names:

  • Old York Road : in Fairview Township
  • Old Trail Road : in Newberry Township
  • Susquehanna Trail : in Conewago Township
  • Susquehanna Trail North : in Manchester Township
  • George Street : in North York, York and Spring Garden Township
  • Susquehanna Trail : in York Township
  • Main Street : in Jacobus and Loganville
  • Susquehanna Trail South : in Springfield Township
  • Main Street : in Shrewsbury
  • Susquehanna Trail : in Shrewsbury Township

Upon crossing the Maryland Line, the Susquehanna Trail in Maryland is now called York Road; all the way into Baltimore. When Interstate-83 was constructed in the 1950s, its path closely followed the Susquehanna Trail between Harrisburg and Baltimore.

TrailMap1925This is a York County slice from a 1925 Map Book. This map book was published one year after the Susquehanna Trail officially opened. The Susquehanna Trail is designated as Route 4, at the time this map book was published.

The complete name of this map book is: “The Official National Survey Maps and Guide for Pennsylvania, Lawton V. Crocker, Topographer, Published by The National Survey Company, Chester, Vermont, 1925.” The map book contains 48 pages of road maps covering the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, plus a map index of villages and towns; along with a historical and descriptive guide. The description for York, Pa. within this 1925 Map Book is as follows:

York, Pa., county seat of York County, so named, with its neighboring county of Lancaster, after the two famous ruling houses of England, whose contest for supremacy is known as the War of the Roses, the white rose representing the house of York.

A trade center and a very rich agricultural region, with a large variety of manufacturing establishments, the larger plants producing ice-making and refrigerating machinery, bank safes and vaults, water turbines, artificial teeth, wall paper, roofing paper, pretzels, auto bodies, tire chains, and cigars. Practically no foreign labor.

The leading agricultural products are: vegetables for the canning factories, wheat, butter, beef and dairy cattle, potatoes, corn, eggs, and strawberries.

The Continental Congress, after fleeing from Philadelphia, in the Revolutionary War, met here Sept. 30, 1777 to June 27, 1778.

Trail1925Text1The 1925 Pennsylvania Map Book contains this description of the Susquehanna Trail, Route 4:

A north and south route across the center of the state, connecting Buffalo and Rochester, New York, on the north, with Washington and Baltimore on the south, via Williamsport and Harrisburg. This route is over improved highways throughout its entire length, practically all of the portion lying in Pennsylvania being of concrete, with a few short stretches of bituminous.

This route is marked by a figure “4” on the state highway markers throughout its entire length in Pennsylvania, and also in New York from the Pennsylvania state lines northward to Rochester. An alternate route from Harrisburg southward through Gettysburg and Frederick is numbered 24 from Harrisburg to the Maryland line.

From Williamsport to Harrisburg the route follows closely to the Susquehanna River. This valley never more than a few miles in width, goes through the ranges of the Alleghenys, which often rise abruptly from the water’s edge for several hundred feet. A free booklet describing this trail may be obtained of the Williamsport Chamber of Commerce, Lycoming Hotel, Williamsport, Pa.

The 1925 Pennsylvania Map Book contains this mileage chart for the Susquehanna Trail. Via the Trail, a journey from York, Pa., to Buffalo, N.Y. was 324 miles going north and 330 miles on the return trip to York; going south.  I’m not sure why the difference.

Trail1925Text2

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 20 . . Europe . . Part 6

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 20 . . . Europe add 2 blanks after GOLD

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 20 . . . Europe

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century. This is Part 6 of Chapter 20 . . . Europe. A new part will be posted every Thursday. Recent chapters stand alone, starting here; however new readers may want to start at the beginning.

Continue reading “RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 20 . . Europe . . Part 6” »

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Handwriting on the Walls of Stonybrook Mill and more Artwork of Cliff Satterthwaite

StonybrookGrinding

I’m continuing my look at the Stonybrook Mill and the artwork of Cliff Satterthwaite; here are the links to the previous parts 1 and 2. The Rev. Walter E. Garrett, Pastor of the Kreutz Creek Charge of the Reformed Church in York County, visited this mill building in the early 1930s and recorded the names and dates written on the walls and posts inside the upper floors of the Stonybrook Mill. The Pastor also provided family connections associated with those names. This post focuses on those names on the walls, along with some neat interior artwork, generously provided by Cliff Satterthwaite.

Cliff’s artwork was done in 1966, the same year that I had a chance to explore the inside of this mill. I remember things inside the mill as if they were suspended in time. Based upon the research by Grant Voaden (see part 2), the mill equipment had likely sat idle for at least 20-years by 1966.

Cliff’s pleinair pencil & paper artwork of the grain grinding wheel and surrounding Stonybrook Mill equipment exquisitely captures the core workings of any Grist Mill. I’ll focus on specific details of that artwork later in this post.

Rev. Garrett liked to include local historical articles in his church newsletters. The Pastor had a recurring column, “Tales Of The Long Ago” and in this case “37. Hiestand’s Mill;” a column that appeared in his July, 1931 newsletter. Grant Voaden, made the discovery of this column and had a copy in his research papers. The article begins:

Hiestand’s Mill is situated at Stony Brook, on the road leading off from the Lincoln Highway to the south. Passing the Lower Mennonite Church and the School House, the mill can be seen to your right [see my post on the Stony Brook School House at this link]. The mill-race and the dam have fallen into ruin and are only a shadow of what they were in their days of activity.

No one knows when or by whom the mill was built. But it is over a century old. This we know because one name written on the wall of the fourth floor is as follows:

“George H. Strickler, A. D. 1829.”

This is written in red and has remained there all these years undisturbed. This date then must be a guide as to the building of the mill. Who built it or when it was built remain unanswered up to the present time.

Some years ago the writer [the Pastor] copied all the names that still can be read which are found on the walls and posts.

Through extensive examination of deeds and tax records, Grant Voaden was fairly certain the Grist Mill was built about 1811 by Christian Hammacher. Hammacher’s Mill becomes Hiestand’s Mill following the 1826 acquisition by Abraham Hiestand. Hiestand owned the mill for more than 30-years. The name George H. Strickler and year 1829, might signify he was an employee or a customer at the time his name got inscribed on the upper-most floor of the mill.

The following is an alphabetized list of names that were written on the posts and walls of the Stonybrook Mill. This was a mill know to Rev. Garrett as Hiestand’s Mill in 1931, when the owners were Hieston & Annie Throne. The names, in this list, represent the whole gambit of owners, employees and customers:

  • “Samuel Arnold, Miller, June 23, 1874”
  • “1875, May 31, J. Baugher”
  • “J. H. Cormaney, April 22, 1892”
  • “O. B. Dietz” this is Oliver B. Dietz
  • “Oliver B. Dietz, Miller, 1881”
  • “C. Ferree, April 5th, 1849”
  • “Jacob Fried” a Veterinarian, who lived on Stone Ridge Road
  • “Henry Heindel”
  • “Abraham Hiestand; H. Hiestand; Daniel Spangler; Michael Wambaugh, March 2, 1841” the mill owner and his likely employees in 1841
  • “William A. Hiestand, Stony Brook” the mill owner from 1870 to 1906
  • “Charles E. Hoffman, Feb., 1927”
  • “W. L. Mundis, Stony Brook, 1885” both a Miller and a Millwright
  • “Samuel C. Ryan, 1849”
  • “W. Ryan”
  • “William J. Ryan, Miller, 1849
  • “William J. Ryan, A. D. 1852”
  • “William Spangler, b. 1909, was a miller at 1901 and only moved here in 1903. Written by Moses Kauffman.” obviously “b.” means something other than “born”; or it is a misprint
  • “William H. Spangler, 1897 last March th9, 1855”
  • “George H. Strickler, A. D. 1829”
  • “Michael C. Wambaugh, Miller, was born November th16, AD 1802.”
  • “6 bush. of W. John Wilson”
  • “Jacob Yinger, 1867.”
  • “Henry Younker” operated the mill in early 1860s for Susan Glatz, who owned the mill from 1860 to 1870

These names were on the upper floors of Stonybrook Mill.

Before I provide the text of the article written by Rev. Garrett, we’ll take that up-close look at Cliff Satterthwaite’s artwork of the grain grinding wheel, which was on the second floor of Stonybrook Mill. I’m sure my readers are just as impressed, as I am, at the attention to detail.

StonybrookGrindDetail

Starting at the top of Cliff’s artwork is the millstone crane mechanism. This allowed a Miller to hook onto the sides of the heavy top millstone, then use the mechanical advantage of the iron screw to lift and flip over the millstone for cleaning.

Next in sequence from the top of the artwork is the hopper, which holds the grain to be ground. The chair supports the hopper. The shoe is below the hopper; it controls the flow rate of grain leaving the hopper. Talk about detail; look closely, you can see the grain dropping off the shoe.

The shoe also guides the grain into the center opening of the top millstone; this is the stone that is rotating, via waterpower in the olden times. The bottom millstone, or bedstone, is stationary.

The millstones do not touch; they are a very small distance from one another. The furrows in the face of the bedstone are in opposite direction to the furrows in the top millstone, which forces the grain from the center to the outside edge of the gap between the stones; all the while the furrows interact with a scissoring action to cut the grain into smaller and smaller pieces.

The wooden cap is positioned to allow a nice-sized gap between the cap and the sides of the millstones and sits above the upper surface of the top millstone. The cap guides the ground grain to the chute. The ground grain flows inside the chute, in the lower left, to be sifted on the first floor.

The following pleinair pencil & paper artwork of Cliff Satterthwaite illustrates the Stonybrook Mill sifter, which sat on the first floor. Look at the detail of the wooden pulleys on the line shaft in the upper left. Back in the olden days, when waterpower operated the mill, this line shaft would have rotated via waterpower and leather drive belts would have stretched from the wooden pulleys to power equipment; such as this sifter.

StonybrookSifter

This artwork also shows the eight-sided posts in the mill. That is something that I distinctly remember about Stonybrook Mill and wondered why such detail work was done inside a working mill. It does add attractive character to the internal surroundings. Comment if you know of other mills with similar eight-sided posts.

After her husband Hieston Throne died in 1963, his widow Annie (Witmer) Throne owned the mill property at 152 Locust Grove Road until her death, at the age of 93 years, in 1970. Clair S. Buchart purchased the mill property at public sale in 1971. The property was later developed as Wyndamere Townhouse Apartments.

Grant Voaden’s notes indicate the mill and all its contents were razed in the first half of 1972. I was away at college, at the time, otherwise I might have tried to save some things. The only items saved, appeared to be some bricks, used to build a patio at the home of John Buchart, near Strickler’s School. At least we have the artwork of Cliff Satterthwaite to visually remember this lost piece of Americana, know as Stonybrook Mill.

Assorted related posts include:

Rev. Garrett noted that he was indebted to Jacob H. Yinger, the blacksmith of Hellam, and his wife, for the information concerning the names written in Stonybrook Mill. “The Yingers lived for a considerable portion of their early lives at Stony Brook, and were well acquainted with some of the men whose names are written on the walls of the old Hiestand Mill.”

Continue reading for the text of the article written by Rev. Garrett:

Continue reading “Handwriting on the Walls of Stonybrook Mill and more Artwork of Cliff Satterthwaite” »

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Grant Voaden’s Stonybrook Mill details; illustrated with Artwork of Cliff Satterthwaite

StonybrookCliffAcrylic

This post continues my look at the Stonybrook Mill and the artwork of Cliff Satterthwaite. Even before Grant Voaden retired as an Engineer with S. Morgan Smith Company, he was interested in water-powered mills; his Diary notes his first visit to Stonybrook Mill was on November 5, 1945. After Grant Voaden retired, his consuming interest was mills; when he set out to visit, research and document most of the nearly 360 mills which once operated along the waterways of York County. Since 1981, Voaden’s extensive research collection has been located in the Archives of York County Heritage Trust. The Stonybrook Mill research is in collection GV-18.

The pleinair acrylic on board artwork, provided by Cliff Satterthwaite, depicts the dark cellar of the Stonybrook Mill. The wooden shaft, banded with metal straps, of the great wooden water wheel is shown within the wheel-pit on the left side of the artwork. The Stonybrook Mill is unique; the overshot water wheel is inside the brick mill building. The remains of mill gearing, under the first floor, are shown on the right side. Cliff’s artwork was done in 1966, the same year that I had a chance to explore the inside of this mill.

Over their lifetime, virtually all mills had many names; a name usually associated with the owner at any particular time. Grant Voaden indexed this mill as Throne’s Mill; named after the last owners Hieston & Annie Throne. Voaden notes that Hiestand’s Mill is also a common name for this mill; that is the name in many historical accounts. When Cliff sought permission to draw the mill, the locals simply called this the Stonybrook Mill.

Through extensive examination of deeds and tax records, Grant Voaden was fairly certain the Grist Mill was built about 1811 by Christian Hammacher. Hammacher’s Mill becomes Hiestand’s Mill following the 1826 acquisition by Abraham Hiestand.

Upon the death of Abraham Hiestand, his will gives the mill to daughter Susan on February 3, 1860; at the time, Susan is the widow of Dr. Glatz. When I examined the 1860 U. S. Census, combined with Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County,  I noted Susan Glatz had Andrew and Henry Younker operating her mill in 1860. In 1870, Susan Glatz sells the mill to William A. Hiestand. In 1906, William’s sister Sarah Hiestand is willed the mill. The final purchase, as an operating mill, is by Hieston & Annie Throne, from the Estate of Sarah Hiestand in 1924.

Upon his many site visits, Grant Voaden photographed all the mills that were still standing. His photographs are also in the collections of the York County Heritage Trust. The following is my favorite photo of Stonybrook Mill, that Voaden took on April 24, 1949. Both Cliff and I believe that the wooden shed-like structure at the right side of the photo was no longer there in 1966.

StonybrookGV18

The left side of this view shows the west (back) side of the mill; i.e. the side not seen from Locust Grove Road. The right side of this view is the south side of the mill; i.e. the side adjacent to the tributary of Stony Run. The main mill building is of brick construction.

Hieston Throne told Grant Voaden, that at one time, the mill contained a full three and one-half stories. Hieston had memories of this mill back to when he was a kid; i.e. when his uncle William A. Hiestand owned the mill. Hieston Throne, also known as Hieth, was born in 1871 and died in 1963. I’ve added annotations to Voaden’s photograph to better describe additional details about Stonybrook Mill.

StonybrookGV18SHS

The artwork of Cliff Satterthwaite, at the beginning of this post, depicts the dark cellar of the Stonybrook Mill. Cliff’s view is in the Cellar, under the 1st Floor, and includes the great shaft of the wooden water wheel, sitting in the wheel-pit. The wheel-pit aligns with the two-story vertical opening in the west wall of the brick mill structure, thus lighting the water wheel in Cliff’s artwork.

Grant Voaden noted the 32-foot diameter, overshot, wooden, water wheel was fed by a race and an overhead wooden flume. I’ve drawn in the appropriate location of the flume. The brick columns, which have partly collapsed, would have supported the flume. A large brick column is located where the flume turns to enter the mill.

Voaden was told that the mill was last run by water-power about in 1920 by William Spangler, who was operating the mill for Sarah Hiestand. Thereafter and into the 1940s, a gas engine powered the mill.

After sitting idle, although protected inside the mill building for 46-years, the wooden water wheel was fairly well preserved, when Cliff Satterthwaite created the following artwork in 1966. I believe a piece of the wooden flume sits on the water wheel. Each time I look at this artwork, I’m astonished at the detail!

StonybrookWoodWheel

The view is looking down on the water wheel from the second floor level. The direction of the view is towards the large vertical opening in the west side of the building, and outside one can see the remains of the large brick column that supported the overhead wooden flume where it turned inside the mill.

A Pastor visited this mill building in the early 1930s and recorded the names and dates written on the posts inside the upper floors of the Stonybrook Mill. Check back on Wednesday as I post that information and also share some additional neat interior artwork, generously provided by Cliff Satterthwaite.

Assorted related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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High Jinks on the Susquehanna Trail

Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement: Part 18

Visualization of an early Susquehanna Trail roadside marker (2014 S. H. Smith design from descriptive bits and pieces within 1919 through 1924 newspaper articles)

Visualization of an early Susquehanna Trail roadside marker (2014 S. H. Smith design from descriptive bits and pieces within 1919 through 1924 newspaper articles)

I was not successful in finding an illustration of an original Susquehanna Trail roadside marker in the many newspapers that I perused to obtain the various articles in this series. I did come across the following descriptive elements within 1919 through 1924 newspaper articles: the marker is 3 feet by 2 feet; the marker is wood; the marker is painted white with black lettering; the marker contains an Indian head symbol; and references are made to a road marker stencil.

Based upon those descriptive elements, this is my visualization of what an early stencil-applied Susquehanna Trail marker might have looked like in 1924. My searches on the Internet did turn up a few round marker variants, which appear to be modern renditions of a round marker that might have been used later in the history of the Trail. If anyone knows the existence of any original Susquehanna Trail markers, please post a comment.

The Trail quickly became a favorite route of motoring tourists. Motels along the trail quickly began to see the benefit of being located on the trail. This produced road marker shenanigans; i.e. the appearance of fake Susquehanna Trail road markers or using stencils of the Susquehanna Trail Indian Head Symbol as fake markers on electric poles and telephone poles. This was all done to direct the flow of traffic by motels or through towns, close to, but not on the Trail.

The following is my favorite article associated with high jinks on the Susquehanna Trail. At the time of this article, in the August 21st, 1924 issue of The Evening News in Harrisburg, the Susquehanna Trail had been open, end-to-end, for one month.

TrailMarkers1924

Trail Markers Removed From Gettysburg Road

The State Highway Department today removed the Indian head symbol of the Susquehanna Trail on the road between Harrisburg and Gettysburg because the road is not part of the trail. The marker had been placed on poles along the Gettysburg road by Gettysburg persons interested in getting traffic to go to their town, the department said.

Notice was given several weeks ago that the markers must come off the poles and, as no attention was paid to it, the department sent out men with planes and all the trail markers were effaced.

This article reaffirms that the alternate route, through Gettysburg, has nothing to do with the Susquehanna Trail, except being an alternate route to reach Washington, D.C. instead of traveling the Susquehanna Trail going through York and Baltimore to reach Washington, D.C.. Thus, The State Highway Department sent out a crew of men, with wood planes, to plane the Susquehanna Trail Indian Head Symbol off of the poles leading to Gettysburg.

The people in Gettysburg must have been reading the Williamsport Chamber of Commerce publicity that showed the Susquehanna Trail going through Gettysburg instead of York. As the trail neared completion, from end to end, in July of 1924, the people in Gettysburg took the road signing into their own hands.

In 1923, the Susquehanna Trail Association had officially designated the Harrisburg-Gettysburg-Washington route as an Alternate Susquehanna Trail route. However, The State Highway Department only recognized the Harrisburg-Gettysburg-Washington route as an alternate route to the Susquehanna Trail; note the difference.  This was a state road, so the State Highway Department had the final say on road signage.

Next Friday, this series will conclude on the Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement.

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 20 . . Europe . . Part 5

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 20 . . . Europe add 2 blanks after GOLD

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 20 . . . Europe

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century. This is Part 5 of Chapter 20 . . . Europe. A new part will be posted every Thursday. Recent chapters stand alone, starting here; however new readers may want to start at the beginning.

Continue reading “RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 20 . . Europe . . Part 5” »

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