The WEISER Sign in the Attic

East Side View of the house “Bloomindale” at 3405 East Market Street, Springettsbury Township (2015 Photo submitted by Terrence Downs)

East Side View of the house “Bloomindale” at 3405 East Market Street, Springettsbury Township (2015 Photo submitted by Terrence Downs)

Last Tuesday’s YorksPast post These Places Matter in Springettsbury Township produced a lot of feedback. Most people wanted more information on the potential zoning change for the northeast corner of East Market Street and Mt. Zion Road.

It is my understanding that a developer has put forth a rezoning proposal from the presently zoned “Neighborhood Commercial” to “Highway Commercial” zoning. “Highway Commercial” is the zoning that exists in the areas surrounding the York Marketplace and the York Mall along East Market Street. Please attend the Springettsbury Township Board of Supervisors Meeting at 7:00 P.M. on May 28 to voice your concerns during public comment at the beginning of the meeting. Spring Lane LLC has requested this rezoning proposal; their request is on the agenda later in the meeting.

Residential neighborhoods nearly surround this area where rezoning is being proposed; with Springetts Manor Apartments bordering a large portion of it. This zoning change is a necessary precursor to development that could demolish three historically significant properties and change green space to gray space.

Recently, Terrence Downs took the photo of the east side of the historic property at 3405 East Market Street. Trees nearly obscure the view of this house, except for this view when traveling west on Market Street; look for it off to your right just before you get to the Paddock.

In this post, I continue my look at “Bloomingdale,” the house at 3405 East Market Street. Rob Frey, Jr. provided some additional comments, providing more insight into the interior of this home where he grew up.

I loved the full open staircase that went from the first floor, passing two stained glass windows on the landing and continuing all the way up to the third floor. As a kid, I remember lowering a string with plastic solders attached all the way down from the top floor, passed the second floor, until it reached the radiator on the first floor. Mission accomplished.

I loved to explore the huge attic, which is a full open space covering the entire top floor of the house. It was full of old mementos i.e. old photo albums, wooden boxes and things that were saved from years gone by. I would spend hours looking through all the old boxes and dusty shelves.   Once in awhile I’d find a treasure, which I’d clean up and then display in my second floor bedroom.

The following “WEISER” sign is one such item discovered in the attic. The house at 3405 East Market Street was named “Bloomingdale” by Rob’s great grandfather, Charles S. Weiser. Rob knew this sign was probably from the time his great grandfather was in the banking business, although eventually Rob could not resist putting a “BUD” sign in front of his “WEISER” sign when he was going to college.

WeiserSign

Charles S. Weiser (1838-1909) was one of Springettsbury Township’s most prominent residents when the Township was established in 1891. However it was his father Charles Weiser (1796-1867) that purchased the initial land in the countryside; at what is now the northeast corner of East Market Street and Mt. Zion Road. This initial purchase of 36.8-acres was made March 28, 1848, and included 916-feet of frontage, along what is now East Market Street.

Charles Weiser (1796-1867) did not live on this property in the country; he lived in a house where the Yorktowne Hotel now sits in Downtown York. His sons, John A. Weiser and Charles S. Weiser, eventually built the houses now standing on this land. These houses initially served as summer residences, however eventually becoming full time residences.

Charles Weiser (1796-1867) established a banking house in York during 1856; known as the “Banking House of Chas. Weiser.” The “WEISER” sign could have come from that business. Alternately the sign could have come from the successful dry goods firm of J. & C. Weiser, established in 1818 by Charles Weiser in partnership with his older brother Jacob Weiser. That business operated out of the Weiser Building, built by their father Samuel Weiser, in place of part of the Golden Swan Tavern (see Jim McClure’s post on Golden Swan Tavern,) that stood on the southeast corner of the square in York.

Charles S. Weiser was admitted to the banking house on January 1, 1860; at such time the business was known as the “Banking House of Charles Weiser & Son.” On January 1, 1867, Charles Weiser’s son-in-law, Jere Carl, is admitted to the firm; at such time the business was known as the “Banking House of Weiser, Son & Carl.” That name remained, even after Charles Weiser died during July of 1867, as seen in the following 1883 bank ad from The York Daily.

Weiser1883Ad

The Weiser Bank building was located on the north side of East Market Street; nearly across the street from the Weiser Building, where Charles S. Weiser’s brother, John A. Weiser, continued to run the mercantile store, until John’s two eldest sons succeeded him in 1883. It is these brothers, John A. Weiser and Charles S. Weiser, which figure prominently in the houses now standing at 3323 and 3405 East Market Street in Springettsbury Township.

York County National Bank bought the Weiser, Son & Carl banking house in 1889 and used the three-story Weiser Bank building as their headquarters for a number of years before settling on 12 East Market Street as the permanent headquarters location in 1929. Through a long series of bank mergers, this is now Wells Fargo Bank in Downtown York.

These are several businesses and buildings that could have utilized the “WEISER” sign found in the attic of 3405 East Market Street. I’ll keep an eye out for old pictures in the collections of the York County Heritage Trust, to see if this sign shows up in any of them.

Photo of 3405 East Market Street from Late-1980s Survey by Historic York, Inc. of Historic Properties in York County (April 1989 photo by Cheryl Neff)

Photo of 3405 East Market Street from Late-1980s Survey by Historic York, Inc. of Historic Properties in York County (April 1989 photo by Cheryl Neff)

This April 1989 photo of 3405 East Market Street is from the late-1980s Survey by Historic York, Inc. of Historic Properties in York County. The Colonial Revival House, “Bloomingdale”, at 3405 East Market Street has also been on list of the most historically significant structures in Springettsbury Township ever since the first list was issued in 2001. It is a house that deserves to be preserved. Does this place or green space matter to you? If so, you may want to attend the Board of Supervisors Meeting at 7:00 p.m. on May 28th and voice your concerns during public comment at the beginning of the meeting.

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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WWI & WWII Navy Destroyers Named after York Veteran

Memorial Day Tribute to Yorker Henry Laub

Memorial Day Tribute to Henry Laub [1792-1813] (Photo of Perry’s Victory & International Peace Memorial from National Park Service, Remainder by S. H. Smith, 2015)

Memorial Day Tribute to Henry Laub [1792-1813] (Photo of Perry’s Victory & International Peace Memorial from National Park Service, Remainder by S. H. Smith, 2015)

While reading old newspapers on microfilm at the York County Heritage Trust, an article from July 9, 1918, piqued my interest; quoting that article from The Gazette and Daily of York PA:

DESTROYER NAMED AFTER FORMER YORKER

The “Laub,” a new destroyer which is now being built at a Western shipyard is named Laub in memory of Midshipman Henry Laub, at whose death in action Congress expressed deep regret, commended his gallantry, and ordered that a sword, be presented to his nearest male relative. Midshipman Laub was born in York; appointed midshipman October 1, 1809, and served under Commodore Perry. He was wounded in the Battle of Lake Erie, September 10, 1813, and carried below, where he was killed instantly by a shot, which crashed through the cockpit. Conrad Laub, who was Sheriff of York County in 1789, is believed to have been a relative of the midshipman.

Some family history research at the York County Heritage Trust revealed that Conrad Laub [1750/51-1807] is the father of Henry Laub. Conrad and Mary Elizabeth (Yost) Laub had eight children. Henry was next to the youngest. Henry Laub was born on March 9, 1792 and was baptized on June 3, 1792 in Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church in York, PA. Conrad Laub served as Sheriff of York County from 1789 to 1792 and also served as Justice of the Peace for the First District in 1792.

Henry Laub enlisted in the United States Navy in 1809 and was appointed midshipman October 1, 1809. Early during the War of 1812, Henry took part in several battles on the ocean. In March 1913, Henry Laub went along with Commodore Perry’s command when Perry was given the task of overseeing the construction of a Lake Erie Fleet, whose mission would be to seize control of the lake from the British. The September 10, 1813 naval Battle of Lake Erie, off of the shoreline of Ohio, had a significant bearing on the outcome of the war.

The experienced British Great Lakes Fleet was under Commander Robert H. Barclay; it consisted of 6 ships with a total of 63 long-range cannons.  Oliver H. Perry commanded the recently built flotilla of 9 smaller vessels for the United States; they were armed with a total of 54 shorter-range carronades.  On September 10, 1813, these fifteen wooden war ships engaged in a fierce battle on Lake Erie.  Against all odds, Commander Perry’s men achieved complete victory.  It was the first time in history that an entire British fleet had been defeated, with all British Ships either destroyed or captured virtually intact.

Commander Perry reported his victory with the simple statement, “We have met the enemy, and they are ours.”  Washington Irving almost immediately published a biography of Oliver Perry, who became a national hero.  Author Irving penned the line, “The last roar of cannon that died along the shores of Lake Erie was the expiring note of British domination.”

The War had a side benefit of settling the issue of the Great Lakes.  Following American Independence, all of the Great Lakes were still British territory.  The War of 1812 Treaty declared the Great Lakes neutral.  The boundary between the United States and Canada, as it is today, running roughly through the middle of the Great Lakes.

Henry Laub was killed while serving on Commander Perry’s flagship, The Lawrence. Later in the battle, Perry famously transferred his command, via rowboat, to The Niagara. Of over 1,000 combatants, 27 Americans and 43 British died. Most of the dead, from the Battle of Lake Erie, were buried-at-sea in Lake Erie. Henry Laub was among the three American officers buried the day after the battle in what is now DeRivera Park in Put-in-Bay Township, Ohio.

Marker in Floor under Rotunda of Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial (American officers were John Brooks, Henry Laub and John Clark, while the British officers were Robert Finnis, John Garland and James Garden)

Marker in Floor under Rotunda of Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial (American officers were John Brooks, Henry Laub and John Clark, while the British officers were Robert Finnis, John Garland and James Garden)

With the construction of the 352-feet tall Perry’s Monument at Put-in-Bay, the six officers, three American and three British, were exhumed from the park and re-interred September 11, 1913, under the floor of the monument’s rotunda, exactly 100-years after they were first buried. The monument is officially called Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial; symbolizing the longstanding peace between the United States and Canada. The 317-foot observation deck, at the top of 461 steps, is the highest man-made observation deck in the National Park System.

Likely as a result of the publicity in conjunction with the re-interments in 1913, Secretary of the Navy, Josephus Daniels, ordered WWI Destroyers to be named after officers Brooks and Laub; whom lost there lives while serving on Commander Perry’s flagship, The Lawrence.

The LAUB [DD-263] (United States Government Navy Photo)

The LAUB [DD-263] (United States Government Navy Photo)

The LAUB (DD-263) was a Clemson-class destroyer launched August 28, 1918 from the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation in Squantum, MA. Miss Marjorie Mohan, a collateral descendent of Henry Laub, sponsored the christening of the destroyer.

The LAUB saw action in the Atlantic and Mediterranean during WWI. From December 1919 until LAUB was decommissioned on June 15, 1922, she performed torpedo experiments and reserve training cruises along the Pacific coast. The LAUB was transferred to Great Britain on October 9, 1940, as part of the destroyer-bases agreement. In the Royal Navy the she was named HMS Burwell (H94) and modified for trade convoy escort. Following WWII, the HMS Burwell was scrapped in 1947.  With the original LAUB renamed, a new LAUB Destroyer was constructed during WWII.

The LAUB II [DD-613] (United States Government Navy Photo)

The LAUB II [DD-613] (United States Government Navy Photo)

The LAUB II (DD-613) was a Benson-class destroyer launched from the Bethlehem Steel Company in San Pedro, CA on April 28, 1942. Miss Barbara Mohun Handley, a collateral descendent of Henry Laub, sponsored the christening of the destroyer.

The LAUB II saw action in the Atlantic and Mediterranean during WWII. Following the Victory in Europe, the destroyer returned to the States for overhaul and had begun training in the Caribbean in preparation for Pacific duty when the Japanese surrender was announced. LAUB II received four battle stars for WWII service and was decommissioned February 2, 1946; joining the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. LAUB II was stricken from the fleet July 1, 1971 and sold for scrap on January 14, 1975.

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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1860 Buildings 21-30 in West Region of Springettsbury Township

Farmhouse at Central York High School

Northwest Region in what is now Springettsbury Township; from Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County, PA & Penn Pilot Aerial Photo, from Sept. 18, 1937, of Same Area (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

Northwest Region in what is now Springettsbury Township; from Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County, PA & Penn Pilot Aerial Photo, from Sept. 18, 1937, of Same Area (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

At the top of this illustration, I’ve pointed out, and marked, ten 1860 buildings in the northwest region within what is now Springettsbury Township. At the bottom of the above illustration is a 1937 aerial photo of the same region. I’ve zoomed in on the 1937 aerial photo to provide better detail in locating the 1860 properties (w21) through (w30).

DetailW21to30

I’m working my way around Springettsbury Township, ten buildings at a time, until all buildings from 1860 are visited. See the post: Springettsbury Township building tally during 1860, for my specification of the four regions.

Other posts in this series include:

Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County contains the owner/occupant of most buildings; for example (w24) is H. Smyser. Additional information on H. Smyser can be found by consulting the 1860 Census of the United States; where one discovers this is Henry Smyser, a 45-year-old, farmer, with extensive real estate holdings.

The results after consulting 1860 Spring Garden Township census records are shown below. Spring Garden Township 1860 Census records must be used because Springettsbury Township was formed from the northeast part of that township on April 20, 1891. The order of visitation, of the census taker, often provides assistance on who are neighbors and the tabulation of “value of real estate” separates the landowners from the renters or tenants:

StCensusW21to30

Six of these 1860 buildings still stand at these addresses:

  • [w21] – 3055 Glen Hollow Road
  • [w22] – 2909 N. Sherman Street
  • [w23] – 760 Mundis Mill Road
  • [w26] – 601 Mundis Mill Road
  • [w28] – 411 Mundis Mill Road
  • [w29] – 470 Mundis Mill Road

Farmhouse at Central York High School

The [w26] farmhouse still sits amid the Shenberger Farm upon which the new Central York High School opened in September, 2005. The following photo of this Georgian Farmhouse is from a Central York Web Site.

Farmhouse on grounds of Central York High School (2015 Photo from a Central York Web Site)

Farmhouse on grounds of Central York High School (2015 Photo from a Central York Web Site)

Utilizing U.S. Census Records, in conjunction with 1860 and 1876 maps of York County, the owner of this farmhouse was pinpointed as John Emig, a 29-year old farmer in 1860. Deed research leading to the discovery that [w28] B. Meyers is 54-year old Benjamin Meyers; yielded the additional clue that his neighbor is “John Emig of Valentine.” This is stating John Emig is the son of Valentine Emig; i.e. to distinguish this John Emig from several individuals named John Emig in the area.

The Biographical Section of John Gibson’s 1886 History of York County, PA states the following about John Emig on page 188:

John Emig was born in 1831, in York County, Penn., and is a son of Valentine and Rebecca (Loucks) Emig, both natives of York County, and descendants of old families. His father was a farmer and our subject was reared a farmer and has devoted his entire time and energy to farming. Mr. Emig came to Spring Garden Township in 1854, and purchased the farm upon which he has ever since resided. It consists of 126 acres of land situated in the Codorus Valley.  This tract of land he has greatly improved, raising all the cereals, and a large crop of fine tobacco each year.

He was married, in 1853, to Miss Sarah Eyster, a native of West Manchester Township, and a descendant of an old family of the county. She died in 1857. Two children were born to them: Horace E., a farmer in York County; and Frank, deceased. In 1858 Mr. Emig married Miss Susan Roth. They have had nine children: Margaret R., Emma R., Edward R., Augustus R., Henry R., Valentine R., William R., George R., and Amanda (deceased). Mr. and Mrs. Emig are members of Mt. Zion German Reformed Church.

In a 1989 interview, the owner Howard Shenberger believed the farmhouse was built about 1840. The 2-1/2 story stone house is three-bays wide and 80-feet in length. The house has three brick chimneys with five fireplaces. The walls of this house are 26-inches thick up to the second floor and 24-inches thick the rest of the way.

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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These Places Matter in Springettsbury Township

Bird’s Eye View of Northeast Corner of East Market Street and Mt. Zion Road in Springettsbury Township; showing buildings along Market Street (Bing.com Bird’s Eye View and 1990s Photos of Properties in Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Files)

Bird’s Eye View of Northeast Corner of East Market Street and Mt. Zion Road in Springettsbury Township; showing buildings along Market Street (Bing.com Bird’s Eye View and 1990s Photos of Properties in Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Files)

The north side of East Market Street, between Mt. Zion Road and the entrance to Springetts Manor Apartments contains three properties on Springettsbury Township’s List of Most Historically Significant Properties. Green space, buffering Springetts Manor Apartments, is behind the residences and businesses lining the east side of Mt. Zion Road from Market Street north to Eisenhower Drive.

Zoning change discussions for this whole area, shown by a dotted line on the Bird’s Eye View are slated to be on the agenda for the Springettsbury Township Board of Supervisors Meeting on May 28th. A zoning change is a necessary precursor to development that could demolish three historically significant properties and change green space to gray space.

This article focuses on one of the historic properties. Bloomingdale is both identified as the general area and as the large home at 3405 East Market Street. According to research by Historic York, 3405 East Market Street was built in 1887, per tax records; possibly in place of an original building indicated on Shearer’s 1860 map. The elaborate 2-1/2-story structure is built on a stone foundation and is covered with weatherboards.

After owner John A. Weiser died on September 20, 1889; his brother Charles S. Weiser (1838-1909) becomes the new owner of this property until his death in 1909. George Prowell’s 1907 History of York County notes in Volume I, page 1071: “Among the beautiful homes in Springettsbury are … Blooming Dale, owned by Charles S. Weiser.” Mrs. Charles Weiser regularly held Daughters of the American Revolution meetings at Bloomingdale. The following photo shows an early-1900s view of the west side of 3405 East Market Street.

Early-1900s View of the West Side of 3405 East Market Street (Submitted by Rob Frey, Jr.)

Early-1900s, West Side of 3405 East Market Street (Submitted by Rob Frey, Jr.)

Charles S. Weiser was in the lumber business and was a banker. Charles served as the acting Postmaster of York for a year in 1891. A few of his other interests included: director of the York County National Bank, treasurer of the York Water Company, a director of the York County Academy, a trustee of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, vice president of the Children’s Home of York and a director of the York & Susquehanna Turnpike Company; which is now Route 462 between York and Wrightsville. Charles S. Weiser was one of Springettsbury’s most prominent residents when the Township was established in 1891.

“Bloomingdale” is noted in the front steps of stonewall fronting 3405 East Market Street. When the State widened East Market Street, they did not fully widen that section. The reason, the State does not touch stonewalls, because they might be historic.

“Bloomingdale” shown in the front steps of stonewall fronting 3405 East Market Street (2015 Photo submitted by Terrence Downs)

“Bloomingdale” shown in the front steps of stonewall fronting 3405 East Market Street (2015 Photo submitted by Terrence Downs)

In 1913, Charles’ widow, Isadora Weiser deeds the properties at 3323 and 3405 East Market Street to Mary Weiser Frey, who had previously married Robert Shaeffer Frey in 1905. Attorney Robert “Pappy” Frey was admitted to the York County Bar in 1904. He served as Prothonotary for York County and was a State Representative. At the time of his death, he was director of the Pennsylvania Legislative Reference Bureau.

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Frey (1883-1946) and then the widow Mary Weiser Frey (1882-1967) owned these properties at 3323 and 3405 East Market Street for over 60-years. Marysue Frey Couser grew up in the house at 3405 East Market Street. She now lives in Waterford, Virginia and provided these memories.

“You have all seen the outside of Bloomingdale. Let me tell you something about the inside. When you walk up the front porch steps to the front door, which is surrounded by leaded glass, you open it to reveal a wide hallway. On the left is the living room with a fireplace. Next to the fireplace is a built-in bookcase with two stained glass windows hidden behind it. To the right of the hall is the dining room that also has a fireplace and a beautiful built-in corner cupboard.”

“At the back of the hall is the stairway to the second floor; above the landing are two more stained glass windows. Upstairs are three bedrooms and two baths. The floors have wide boards. There is a small room on the second floor that long ago used to be a kitchen when I was little. During WWII they used to have blackouts. My mother and I were in this little kitchen one night when you had to have all the lights out. She lit a cigarette and I was sure the bad guys up in the sky would see it and we would be in big trouble.”

“An apartment on the second floor was where my grandmother, Mary Weiser Frey, lived. It had the same floor plan as a downstairs apartment at the rear of the house, with one exception. In her bedroom you would access one of the bedrooms in our part of the house. Every morning she would come over to see us and say “Good Morning”. I thought her name was “Morning”. So, all the grandchildren called her by that name, “Morning”.”

“My brother, sister and I have all chosen to live in old houses; my brother in a house on Old Orchard Road in Springettsbury Township, my sister in an old restored town library in Connecticut and I who live in Waterford, VA; an old town where all the houses are on the National Register. As you can see, growing up in an old house has definitely impacted the way we chose to live our lives.”

3405StainedGlassTerrence Downs took this photo of a stained glass window, one of which is on both sides of the front door as seen from Market Street. Terry is pretty certain these are John Rudy stained glass windows and from Marysue’s comments the house contains many more. Her brother, Rob Frey, Jr. provided these memories.

“My homestead is a special place; like most homes where you grow up. But the old house at 3405 Lincoln Highway was named “Bloomingdale” by my great grandfather Charles Weiser. It is truly a special landmark. I never realized how different it was until I got a little older. When people asked where I lived, I’d say right across from the Paddock…and they knew the place. The big white house! It does stand out. It is beautiful, unique and historic. It was special place then and it remains so today.”

“The front entry way is special. The door is rather large and the windows (lights) surrounding it are clear leaded glass. The larger pieces of glass are beveled on each edge. I remember, how I would look through the bevels and see the colorful prism rainbow distort my view to the street.”

“But the best feature on the second floor was a door that lead to my grandmother’s (Mary Weiser Frey) apartment. It was a complete two-bedroom apartment. It is still there. And when I got married, my wife Sally and I along with our first son Rob Frey III, lived in that same second floor apartment for several years until I was transferred with my job.”

“The house is full of history, as are most family homes. But this house has generations of family history that lived 150 years ago. It’s part of York County history. It’s part of the community. It’s part of Springettsbury Township.”

The Colonial Revival House, “Bloomingdale”, at 3405 East Market Street has been on list of the most historically significant structures in Springettsbury Township ever since the first list was issued in 2001. It is a house that deserves to be preserved. Does this place or green space matter to you? If so, you may want to attend the Board of Supervisors Meeting at 7:00 p.m. on May 28th and voice your concerns during public comment at the beginning of the meeting.

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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The Log House in Historic Hellam Preserve

Mid-18th Century Germanic Log House on the grounds of the Historic Hellam Preserve (S. H. Smith, 2015)

Mid-18th Century Germanic Log House on the grounds of the Historic Hellam Preserve (S. H. Smith, 2015)

I attended the Preservation Celebration for 40 Years of Historic York, Inc. at the Historic Hellam Preserve yesterday. This post shares some photos of two of the buildings on the grounds. References are from points made in Joe Kindig’s Keynote presentation and discussions with others attending this gathering.

The key Germanic characteristics of this log house are the steep pitch gable roof with a two-story attic, the large central chimney and slight flared-up roof-lines at the lower parts of the roof. This house has a raised stone walkout basement, with walls containing thin flat stones. This type of stonewall construction is unusual, although two old barns in the area also exhibited this type of construction.

Dendrochronological analysis (tree-ring dating) indicated the original log house was built in the winter of 1758/9 or shortly thereafter. It was built by John Shultz about 500-feet from Kreutz Creek in Hellam Township, York County, PA. The logs are fit together with dovetails at the corners.

Continue reading for five additional photos. Continue reading “The Log House in Historic Hellam Preserve” »

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Avalong Farms Miniature Golf & Arnold Palmer Driving Range

Avalong Farms Miniature Golf along Mt. Zion Road in Springettsbury Township (Sunday Aug. 16, 1964 Artwork by Cliff Satterthwaite)

Avalong Farms Miniature Golf along Mt. Zion Road in Springettsbury Township (Sunday Aug. 16, 1964 Artwork by Cliff Satterthwaite)

I remember Avalong Farms Miniature Golf during our family’s many visits to the Dairy Bar or the Drive-In. I believe Cliff Satterthwaite drew the Avalong miniature golf course about the time it opening along Mt. Zion Road during 1964.

AvalongDrivingAbout five years later, a franchise for an Arnold Palmer Driving Range was obtained and at that time the miniature golf course was upgraded to an Arnold Palmer Putting Course. This May 16, 1970 ad in The Gazette and Daily notes an American Cancer Society fundraiser at The Arnold Palmer Putting Course and Driving Range on Mt. Zion Road.

A blank scorecard for the par-36 Arnold Palmer Putting Course is included at the end of this post. As I recall, the putting course reverted back to a miniature golf course within a few years. Likewise, the Arnold Palmer Driving Range simply became a driving range about the same time. Maybe one of my readers can provide the details.

Internet sites devoted to miniature golf and driving ranges note that Arnold Palmer Putting Course and Driving Range franchises began in the late 1960s, so these facilities at Avalong were likely some of the earliest in the country. The sites also mention that none of these facilities remain in the United States, although some remain in the United Kingdom; however no longer under the Arnold Palmer name.

The following THEN & NOW Aerial Photos show where the Arnold Palmer Driving Range and the Miniature Golf course were located with respect to Avalong Farms Dairy Bar and the Drive-In. In terms of the present surroundings, the driving range and miniature golf facilities sat where the stormwater retention basin is situated just north of the Rutter’s store along Mt. Zion Road. Driving range golf balls would have been flying over the Red Robin into Boscov’s parking lot at the Galleria.

THEN & NOW Aerial Photos at the intersection of Mt. Zion Road and Whiteford Road in Springettsbury Township (THEN photo from York County Archives and NOW photo from Bing.com; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

THEN & NOW Aerial Photos at the intersection of Mt. Zion Road and Whiteford Road in Springettsbury Township (THEN photo from York County Archives and NOW photo from Bing.com; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

Related posts:

AvalongPutting

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Third Avalong Barn captured by Cliff Satterthwaite

Southward view of Avalong Barn along Mt. Zion Road in Springettsbury Township (1964 Artwork by Cliff Satterthwaite)

Southward view of Avalong Barn along Mt. Zion Road in Springettsbury Township (1964 Artwork by Cliff Satterthwaite)

Cliff Satterthwaite’s 1973 photo of a Parade of Vintage Cars in Springettsbury Township contained a background farmhouse directly south of Avalong Farms Dairy Bar. I remembered a large barn in front of that house during our family’s many visits to the Dairy Bar or the Drive-In, during the 1960s. Cliff Satterthwaite captured this third Avalong Barn in 1964 via his artwork and via a photograph.

I call this the third Avalong Barn, after the two Avalong Barns that sat along Whiteford Road; just east of the Mansion House, now Christmas Tree Hill. The Avalong Barn closest to Whiteford Road is the one that burnt down. Directly behind that barn was the Avalong Barn that was converted into a “Pfaltzgraff Outlet” Barn and was demolished in 2013 to build a branch of Susquehanna Bank.

The third Avalong Barn was accessed via a short lane from Mt. Zion Road or off the lane to the farmhouse. The third Avalong Barn was of the same style as the two barns along Whiteford Road. This is Cliff Satterthwaite’s 1964 photograph of the Avalong Barn along Mt. Zion Road.

Southwest view of Avalong Barn along Mt. Zion Road in Springettsbury Township (1964 Photo by Cliff Satterthwaite)

Southwest view of Avalong Barn along Mt. Zion Road in Springettsbury Township (1964 Photo by Cliff Satterthwaite)

Using historic aerial photos, the third Avalong Barn is removed by early 1972. When the “Pfaltzgraff Outlet” Barn and was demolished in 2013, I remember hearing talk about fires at two Avalong Barns. I think that second barn fire was likely at this third Avalong Barn and not at the “Pfaltzgraff Outlet” Barn, which some people contented. It is easy to see the confusion, since all three Avalong Barns looked alike. Unfortunately this confusion may have contributed to the demolition of the only Avalong Barn not to be touched by fire.

However all three Avalong Barns appear on the earliest available historic aerial photo, dated 1938.  This was when the owner was Harold Robertson, who had extensive livestock operations that included cattle, swine and turkeys in addition to his dairy; selling his milk to the Lancaster Milk Company and Cedar Hill Dairy.

The following THEN & NOW Aerial Photos show where Cliff Satterthwaite was standing and his viewpoint for his artwork and photo of the third Avalong Barn; which I’ve indicated the location where it sat prior to 1972. In terms of the present surroundings, the third Avalong Barn sat where the parking lot is located in front of Books-A-Million.

THEN & NOW Aerial Photos at the intersection of Mt. Zion Road and Whiteford Road in Springettsbury Township (THEN photo from York County Archives and NOW photo from Bing.com; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

THEN & NOW Aerial Photos at the intersection of Mt. Zion Road and Whiteford Road in Springettsbury Township (THEN photo from York County Archives and NOW photo from Bing.com; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

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Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Parade of Vintage Cars in Springettsbury Township

Parade of Vintage Cars in Springettsbury Township (April 15, 1973 Photo by Cliff Satterthwaite)

Parade of Vintage Cars in Springettsbury Township (April 15, 1973 Photo by Cliff Satterthwaite)

On April 15, 1973, this part of a parade of vintage cars traveled north on Mt. Zion Road and turned into the road in front of York County Tourist Information Center; now Whiteford Road along the south end of Springettsbury Township Park. The vintage cars motorcade left at 1:30 p.m. from the Historical Society of York County in Downtown York and traveled the Lincoln Highway eastwardly, turning north on Mt. Zion Road.

Besides local dignitaries the cars carried guests: Congressman George A. Goodling, State Secretary of Revenue Robert P. Kane and Deputy Secretary of State Community Affairs Albert Hydeman. This parade was all part of the ceremonies for the Grand Opening of the York County’s new Tourist Information Center at the Mt. Zion Road Interchange of the newly opened 4-Lane Route 30.

The following THEN & NOW Aerial Photos show where Cliff Satterthwaite was standing and his southward viewpoint when he took the Parade of Vintage Cars photo. In Cliff’s photo: the elevated roadway in the background is Route 30; the farmhouse sitting in the field south of Avalong Farms Dairy Bar is long since gone and is now the location of a BigLots! store; and all the concrete in the photo is the intersection of Mt. Zion Road and Whiteford Road, before the traffic islands were installed.

THEN & NOW Aerial Photos at the intersection of Mt. Zion Road and Whiteford Road in Springettsbury Township (THEN photo from York County Archives and NOW photo from Bing.com; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

THEN & NOW Aerial Photos at the intersection of Mt. Zion Road and Whiteford Road in Springettsbury Township (THEN photo from York County Archives and NOW photo from Bing.com; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

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Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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York County Tourist Information Center and Avalong

Cliff Satterthwaite sketch capturing opening of York County’s Tourist Information Center at intersection of Route 30 and Mt. Zion Road (York Daily Record, April 19, 1973)

Cliff Satterthwaite sketch capturing opening of York County’s Tourist Information Center at intersection of Route 30 and Mt. Zion Road (York Daily Record, April 19, 1973)

In this sketch, Cliff Satterthwaite captures the energetic Grand Opening of the York County Tourist Information Center along Mt. Zion Road; across from Avalong Farms Dairy Bar. The opening occurred on April 15, 1973 and in the first four months 16,000 visitors had passed through the doors.

The center’s placement along the newly constructed four-lane Route 30 by-pass and having several television crews on hand for the opening created nice exposure for York as a tourist destination. Cliff’s sketch even captures the Channel 2 detail on the camera for the television crew from Baltimore.

Some of Cliff’s cutout murals also graced the entrance lobby, as seen in this submitted photo. From left to right: Marquis de Lafayette toast that likely saved General Washington’s command; John Elgar’s First Iron Steamboat; Earliest Balloon Ascensions; Phineas Davis’ First Practical Coal Burning Locomotive; and List of a few York First’s. Do any of my readers know where these murals are now located?

TouristInfoB

Cliff Satterthwaite’s cutout murals inside York County’s Tourist Information Center (Submitted by Cliff Satterthwaite)

TouristInfoCHere is a zoomed-in view of the list showing a few of the firsts for York, Pennsylvania. The April 26, 1972, issue of the York Daily Record contained an article about the York County Visitors and Tourist Bureau signing contracts for the new tourist center: “The Colonial style information center, which adjoins Mt. Zion Road interchange and the by-pass, will be erected on a one acre track which has been leased to the bureau for 50 years at $1 a year by Clyde and Joanne Long, owners of Avalong Dairy.”

“Designed by H. B. Stultz, Jr., registered architect of York, the 2400-square feet building will feature a 49-seat theater in which 10-minute films of York County tourist attractions will be shown. The large entrance lobby will house exhibits of York industrial products and displays showing the historic highlights of the York area. The building will also house offices of the bureau as well as public facilities. The parking lot has space for 47 cars plus tourist buses. Access to the lot will be from Mt. Zion Road and exit will be to School Road.”

The road fronting York County’s Tourist Information Center was then known as School Road; so named after Springettsbury Township School which sat east of the center. This road is now an eastward extension of Whiteford Road, forming the southern boundary of Springettsbury Township Park.

Years later, the number of visitors at the Mt. Zion Road tourist information center dropped off and Harley Davidson offered to consolidate the York County tourist information function within their visitor center. The Mt. Zion Road building passed onto new owners until Springettsbury Township purchased the building in 2007.

Since 2008, the building on the corner of Mt. Zion and Whiteford Roads has been used as the Headquarters for York Area United Fire & Rescue until they moved into quarters within the new firehouse on Commons Drive last year. Since then the building at 3321 Whiteford Road has been used for firefighter training; such was the case at the time of the following top photo, from March of this year. When I drove by the building May 1st, it had been demolished; bottom photo.

Northwest Views of the former York County Tourist Information Center along Mt. Zion Road, during March and May 2015 (S. H. Smith Photos)

Northwest Views of the former York County Tourist Information Center along Mt. Zion Road, during March and May 2015 (S. H. Smith Photos)

I wonder how the 50-year lease for land, which the building sat upon, figures into all the transactions? Fifty-years takes one from 1972 to 2022; which is seven years from now.

I checked for other newspaper articles about the 50-year lease and found the July 3, 1971 issue of the York Daily Record, which reported: “Plans for the construction of a new tourist information center by York County Visitors and Tourist Bureau advanced a step Thursday night when subdivision plans for the project were approved by the Springettsbury Township Board of Supervisors. The site for the building, a one-acre tract of land, is being leased to the tourist organization for 50 years at $1 per year by Clyde and Joanne Long, owners of Avalong Dairy, who are members of the bureau.”

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Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Blackbridge Road went under Black Bridge

Black Bridge, Penn. R. R., York, Pa. (Postcard from S. H. Smith Collections)

Black Bridge, Penn. R. R., York, Pa. (Postcard from S. H. Smith Collections)

Black Bridge carries trains over the Codorus Creek as railroad traffic moves between York and Emigsville. A railroad bridge was first built at this location in 1848.

In this postcard view of Black Bridge, the photographer is standing in Manchester Township and looking across the Codorus Creek into Springettsbury Township. The path under the closest bridge span is the initial Blackbridge Road, which hugged the Manchester Township bank of the Codorus Creek at this location.

Besides the bridge carrying the railroad tracks over the Codorus Creek, until recently, it has also carried the railroad tracks over a public road. This road took the name Blackbridge Road after the bridge was dubbed Black Bridge; this naming will be the subject of a future post.

I’ve pointed out the original location of Blackbridge Road on the following October 9, 1957 aerial photo. I also drew the location of Toronita Street north of Arsenal Road; to be built about 1960 to intersect with the original Blackbridge Road. The reason for the partially completed I-83 in 1957 is told in the post: 4-Lane Interstate planned through Downtown York?

October 9, 1957 Aerial Photo of Codorus Creek north of York, PA (Aerial Photo from Penn Pilot; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

October 9, 1957 Aerial Photo of Codorus Creek north of York, PA (Aerial Photo from Penn Pilot; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

In the 1980s a new Blackbridge Road was built, and much of the original Blackbridge Road was abandoned. This was done because of anticipated heavier traffic use, due to the late 1989 opening of the York County Solid Waste Incinerator on Blackbridge Road.   I drew the new Blackbridge Road at the appropriate location on the 1957 Aerial Photo.

The location of the present Blackbridge Road, high on the hillside, versus the creek-side location at the base of cliffs, is highlighted in the following photo taken from the newly opened 2.5-mile Springettsbury Township section of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park.

Cliffs along the Codorus Creek, just west of Black Bridge, in Manchester Township (2015 Photo and Annotation by S. H. Smith)

Cliffs along the Codorus Creek, just west of Black Bridge, in Manchester Township (2015 Photo and Annotation by S. H. Smith)

These rocky cliffs are the reason that the Codorus Creek makes a sharp 90-degrees turn from flowing northward to flowing eastward. Let’s look at another aerial photo from September 18, 1937; where I’ve zoomed in on Black Bridge. I again point out the original location of Blackbridge Road; look closely and you can see it passing under Black Bridge.

September 18, 1937 Aerial Photo of Black Bridge area of Codorus Creek in York County, PA (Aerial Photo from Penn Pilot; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

September 18, 1937 Aerial Photo of Black Bridge area of Codorus Creek in York County, PA (Aerial Photo from Penn Pilot; Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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