Teacher grading: When a 4.0 was poor

York County Teachers’ Provisional Certificate for Samuel S. Matthews during 1859; with Zoomed-In Explanation of Grading at the Bottom (From Collections of York County Heritage Trust)

York County Teachers’ Provisional Certificate for Samuel S. Matthews during 1859; with Zoomed-In Explanation of Grading at the Bottom (From Collections of York County Heritage Trust)

A York County Teachers’ Provisional Certificate for Samuel S. Matthews includes his examination results in five subjects: Orthography, Reading, Writing, Written Arithmetic and Teaching.  With a grade point average of 2.1, Samuel was granted a provisional teachers certificate for one year; during the 1859-1860 school year.

A 4.0 grade point average signified Poor performance in the 1800s.  Back then, striving to be number one in exams meant striving for a 1.0 grade.  The teachers certificate explains the grading system: No. 1, signifies Very Good; 2, Good; 3, Middling; 4, Poor; and 5, Very Poor.  Somewhere in the 1900s, the grade numbering system flip-flopped to higher numbers being desired.

During the 1885-1886 school year, the School Directors of Hopewell Township, York County, PA, used a combination of teachers’ grade point average on their certificate and a mark given by the school directors, based upon in-class teaching ability to set the teachers’ pay.  The same No. 1 through 5 grading system was used for the Directors Mark.

The Certificates and Directors Mark were averaged, and the resulting Salary Mark set each teachers pay. During the 1885-1886 school year, a Salary Mark of less than 1.5 resulted in pay of $32.00 per month; from 1.5 to 2.0, $28.00 per month; from 2.0 to 2.5, $26.00 per month; and over 2.5, $24.00 per month.  For the 1885-1886 school year, I’ve listed the 27 teachers, and one-room school where they taught, in Hopewell Township; from best to worst [Salary Mark]:

Salary of $32.00 per month (33% above lowest salary)

  • [1.00] Lizzie Gable (Gemmill’s, 2 mos)
  • [1.20] M. Elmer Bailey (Gemmill’s, 3 mos)
  • [1.27] Ella M. Ebaugh (Ebaugh’s)
  • [1.39] T. Benton Baird (Hyson’s)
  • [1.47] Amanda M. Duncan (Round Hill)

Salary of $28.00 per month (17% above lowest salary)

  • [1.53] D. C. Waltemyre (Mt. Pleasant)
  • [1.56] Emanuel S. Klinefelter (Gerber’s)
  • [1.56] Jos. O. Seitz (Leib’s)
  • [1.58] Sallie E. Leib (Bose’s)
  • [1.61] Mary M. Smith (Anstine’s)
  • [1.77] Annie P. Hess (Hildebrand’s)
  • [1.89] L. S. Waltemyre (Hartman’s)
  • [1.89] Alice J. Hendrix (Wallace’s)
  • [1.92] James M. Grove (Bowman’s)
  • [1.97] Emma V. Redding (Trout’s)

Salary of $26.00 per month (8% above lowest salary)

  • [2.13] Annie G. Liggit (Manifold’s)
  • [2.16] Maggie S. Wallace (Duncan’s)
  • [2.16] W. Clinton Bailey (Miller’s)
  • [2.17] Bertha F. Yost (Collins’)
  • [2.22] Eli B. Keller (Strayer’s)
  • [2.23] Shade S. Robinson (Center)
  • [2.31] Ellsworth Peterman (Myers’)
  • [2.44] Ella M. Manifold (Glessick’s)
  • [2.50] Hannah Waltermyre (Fulton’s)

Salary of $24.00 per month (lowest salary)

  • [2.70] R. A. Grove (Sechrist’s)
  • [2.73] S. A. Miller (Hake’s)
  • [2.78] J. Elmer Evans (Zion)

The York County Teachers’ Provisional Certificate for Samuel S. Matthews comes from the Collections of York County Heritage Trust.  Records of the School Directors of Hopewell Township, York County, PA, for the1885-1886 school year, come from the Collections of the Stewartstown Historical Society.

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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One-room school called Burnt Cabin

Burnt Cabin One-Room Schoolhouse (circa 1900) along Vinegar Ferry Road [now River Drive] in Hellam Township, York Co., Pa. (Originally from Anna Shields; Submitted by Katina Snyder)

Burnt Cabin One-Room Schoolhouse (circa 1900) along Vinegar Ferry Road [now River Drive] in Hellam Township, York Co., Pa. (Originally from Anna Shields; Submitted by Katina Snyder)

Burnt Cabin One-Room Schoolhouse sat on the west side of Vinegar Ferry Road [now River Drive], just north of where the headwaters of main branch of Wildcat Run cross that road in Hellam Township.

Katina Snyder submitted three undated photos of Burnt Cabin. At one time, the photos belonged to Anna Shields, a long time teacher in the one-room schools of Hellam Township.

The topography of the land in the photos agrees with the Burnt Cabin School placement on the following 1908 Topographic Map section. Burnt Cabin School is next to the red arrow that I’ve added to the map.

Northwest Section of Hellam Township, York Co., PA (1908 Topographic Map)

Northwest Section of Hellam Township, York Co., PA (1908 Topographic Map)

The following photo looks at the south side of the Burnt Cabin One-Room Schoolhouse with Vinegar Ferry Road passing on the right side, down to the Susquehanna River. The flying American flag has obviously been added to both of the photos; pasted onto the flagpoles. However in the first photo, sitting up against the front porch, there is also a flag that is clearly part of the original photo; was it being mounted on a board, for display in the schoolhouse?

Burnt Cabin One-Room Schoolhouse (circa 1900) along Vinegar Ferry Road [now River Drive] in Hellam Township, York Co., Pa. (Originally from Anna Shields; Submitted by Katina Snyder)

Burnt Cabin One-Room Schoolhouse (circa 1900) along Vinegar Ferry Road [now River Drive] in Hellam Township, York Co., Pa. (Originally from Anna Shields; Submitted by Katina Snyder)

The flags on the flagpoles definitely have 45 stars, in an 8, 7, 8, 7, 8, 7 -per row configuration. The 45 star flag was adopted in 1896 and continued in use until another star was added in 1908. That is the reason I’ve estimated the date of these photos as ‘circa 1900.’

Through the late 1870s, about 40-students filled the Burnt Cabin One-Room Schoolhouse. I suspect many were children of a large workforce in the River Hills, primarily consisting of lumbermen and men involved in charcoaling. For even though Codorus Furnace shut down in 1850, the furnaces between Columbia and Marietta were still producing iron using a process that needed large quantities of charcoal.

Charcoal made an ideal iron furnace fuel, because its’ ash, consisting largely of lime and alkalis, supplied part of the necessary flux for the smelting process. Heating wood in the absence of air makes charcoal. It is a long involved process to char the wood throughout without allowing it to burn to ashes. Because of the large charcoaling operations in the Hellam Hills, I suspect that is why the school got the name Burnt Cabin.

Continue reading to discover when Burnt Cabin Schoolhouse burnt down. Continue reading

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Neat details about Yorkshire History Walk

Neat Yorkshire details, by those that took part in the Yorkshire History Walk, will be incorporated into the scripts for a repeat of this walk during this fall or next spring. With respect to your questions about recent YorksPast posts; some technical difficulties have developed such that even though I can again put up posts, formatting and linking are still not available to me. Believe me when I tell you these problems have caused a lot of wasted time and frustration.

About forty took part in a walk through the Yorkshire community of Springettsbury Township on Saturday. Brenda Neff submitted this photo of the group gathering at Yorkshire history walk Stop 3; the Mystery of Greystone Road.

The mystery of Greystone Road involves that road segment between Eastern Boulevard and First Avenue; it was originally planned but never built. It was a reader of my Blog who raised the question; “it looks like a road was meant to pass through here, why didn’t it get built?” That question was relatively easily answered during the walk. However a more complex mystery evolved via comments and questions that emerged at the first stop of the walk.

Edna F. Dimmerling appears to be the sole person behind the initial development of Yorkshire. Who is Edna Dimmerling? How did Edna finance the purchase, development and promotion of the initial 70-acres of Yorkshire? Why did Edna’s plan for Yorkshire falter? Nevertheless, what is Edna’s impact on today’s Yorkshire?

The first stop on the history walk was placed along Eastern Boulevard, where it crossed the western boundary of the 70-acre Yorkshire Plan No. 1 drawn up by York Civil Engineer, Robert B. McKinnon in May of 1924. These 70-acres were once part of Edwin Myers massive 458-acre Meadowbrook estate. Edwin’s widow sold this piece of that estate to a Lancaster County farmer, Charles Bacon, in 1919; who continued to solely farm the land.

During May of 1924, Edna F. Dimmerling purchased that land from Mr. Bacon. This is the same Edna Dimmerling, who 5-months later sells the vast majority of the lots in the Yorkshire development to Mahlon Haines; one of several land purchases Mahlon made in the fall of 1924 to create his 318-acre Yorkshire Ranch.

Edna Dimmerling is consistently the only person listed in the earliest Yorkshire property transactions, where she is described as a single woman of York, York County, Pennsylvania. The United States Census tells me Edna was 38-years old in 1924. Directories of that time, indicate Edna was a secretary in a realtor’s office in York known as Diehl on the Square, that realtor appears as the sales agent in the first weeks of Yorkshire development advertising. However when a big Yorkshire lot sale was staged at the end of June of 1924, The Conrad Realty Company of Harrisonburg, Virginia, was the selling agent.

During the last big day of that sale, full-page local ads noted The Spring Garden Band would be giving a concert during the afternoon’s sale and a new Hudson automobile was to be given away. However based upon the low deed activity and not a mention by the local papers in the sale’s aftermath, it appears that sale was a flop.

While a few of the Yorkshire lots sold during the sales and auction, Edna Dimmerling unloaded the vast majority of the lots in the Yorkshire development to Mahlon Haines a few months later on October 27th. When I discover more details of this turbulent start to the Yorkshire development I’ll post them on YorksPast.

Dimmerling is not a common York County name, as confirmed by the scarcity of that surname in family history files at the York County History Center. Edna’s father was Frank Dimmerling. Frank was discovered by matching his three children: Edna, Stella and Frank; as confirmed via Census records, with Frank Dimmerling’s obituary in the September 24, 1898 issue of the Evening Report, a Lebanon, PA newspaper. “Frank Dimmerling, who has been ill for about two years with liver troubles, died this morning at 4:30 o’clock at his home, 705 Walnut Street, this city [Lebanon, PA]. He was aged 39 years, a baker by trade, having followed that business for 13 years. He was a native of Pottsville, coming to this city six years ago. He conducted a bakery until the spring of 1897, when ill health came on. He was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church and is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary and three children, Edna, Stella and Frank.”
It looks like Edna F. Dimmerling was likely born in Pottsville and moved to Lebanon with her family in 1892; the at age of 6 or 7. Edna then moved with her widowed mother and siblings to York after 1900, because in 1900 the family is still at 705 Walnut Street in Lebanon, per the 1900 Census. Edna’s mother, Mary Dimmerling, re-marries at least once to Joseph C. Grove and there is a connection to the Steininger family, possibly another husband of Mary. One possibility being examined is that a step-father of Edna could have been a backer to help finance the purchase, development and promotion of the initial 70-acres of Yorkshire development.

One of those promotions was a big three-day Yorkshire lot sale, staged June 26th, 27th and 28th of 1924. Initial advertising noted this about The Conrad Realty Company of Harrisonburg, Virginia, who was retained as the selling agent for the three-day Yorkshire lot auction: “This sale may not last three days. We sold 260 lots at ‘Hershey Heights’ on Saturday afternoon, May 24th in 2-1/2 hours in face of a heavy rain storm. What will happen at beautiful ‘Yorkshire’? We don’t know but we predict that these lots will not last but one day. We have 288 lots laid out on this sub-division.”

They did not have the “Hershey success” at Yorkshire. The sale lasted the full three days with the majority of the lots left unsold; this based upon the low deed activity and not a mention by the local papers in the sale’s aftermath. It appears that sale was a flop. I also failed to discover who, if anyone, won the Hudson automobile. Here is the full page advertisement for the third day of that sale, as it appeared in The Gazette and Daily on Saturday morning June 28, 1924.

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Edna Dimmerling mystery evolves in Yorkshire


About forty took part in a walk through the Yorkshire community of Springettsbury Township on Saturday. Brenda Neff submitted this photo of the group gathering at Yorkshire history walk Stop 3; the Mystery of Greystone Road.
The mystery of Greystone Road involves that road segment between Eastern Boulevard and First Avenue; it was originally planned but never built. It was a reader of my Blog who raised the question; “it looks like a road was meant to pass through here, why didn’t it get built?” That question was relatively easily answered during the walk. However a more complex mystery evolved via comments and questions that emerged at the first stop of the walk.
Edna F. Dimmerling appears to be the sole person behind the initial development of Yorkshire. Who is Edna Dimmerling? How did Edna finance the purchase, development and promotion of the initial 70-acres of Yorkshire? Why did Edna’s plan for Yorkshire falter? Nevertheless, what is Edna’s impact on today’s Yorkshire?
The first stop on the history walk was placed along Eastern Boulevard, where it crossed the western boundary of the 70-acre Yorkshire Plan No. 1 drawn up by York Civil Engineer, Robert B. McKinnon in May of 1924. These 70-acres were once part of Edwin Myers massive 458-acre Meadowbrook estate. Edwin’s widow sold this piece of that estate to a Lancaster County farmer, Charles Bacon, in 1919; who continued to solely farm the land.
During May of 1924, Edna F. Dimmerling purchased that land from Mr. Bacon. This is the same Edna Dimmerling, who 5-months later sells the vast majority of the lots in the Yorkshire development to Mahlon Haines; one of several land purchases Mahlon made in the fall of 1924 to create his 318-acre Yorkshire Ranch.
Edna Dimmerling is consistently the only person listed in the earliest Yorkshire property transactions, where she is described as a single woman of York, York County, Pennsylvania. The United States Census tells me Edna was 38-years old in 1924. Directories of that time, indicate Edna was a secretary in a realtor’s office in York known as Diehl on the Square, that realtor appears as the sales agent in the first weeks of Yorkshire development advertising. However when a big Yorkshire lot sale was staged at the end of June of 1924, The Conrad Realty Company of Harrisonburg, Virginia, was the selling agent.
During the last big day of that sale, full-page local ads noted The Spring Garden Band would be giving a concert during the afternoon’s sale and a new Hudson automobile was to be given away. However based upon the low deed activity and not a mention by the local papers in the sale’s aftermath, it appears that sale was a flop.
While a few of the Yorkshire lots sold during the sales and auction, Edna Dimmerling unloaded the vast majority of the lots in the Yorkshire development to Mahlon Haines a few months later on October 27th. When I discover more details of this turbulent start to the Yorkshire development I’ll post them on YorksPast.
Dimmerling is not a common York County name, as confirmed by the scarcity of that surname in family history files at the York County History Center. Edna’s father was Frank Dimmerling. Frank was discovered by matching his three children: Edna, Stella and Frank; as confirmed via Census records, with Frank Dimmerling’s obituary in the September 24, 1898 issue of the Evening Report, a Lebanon, PA newspaper. “Frank Dimmerling, who has been ill for about two years with liver troubles, died this morning at 4:30 o’clock at his home, 705 Walnut Street, this city [Lebanon, PA]. He was aged 39 years, a baker by trade, having followed that business for 13 years. He was a native of Pottsville, coming to this city six years ago. He conducted a bakery until the spring of 1897, when ill health came on. He was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church and is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary and three children, Edna, Stella and Frank.”
It looks like Edna F. Dimmerling was likely born in Pottsville and moved to Lebanon with her family in 1892; the at age of 6 or 7. Edna then moved with her widowed mother and siblings to York after 1900, because in 1900 the family is still at 705 Walnut Street in Lebanon, per the 1900 Census. Edna’s mother, Mary Dimmerling, re-marries at least once to Joseph C. Grove and there is a connection to the Steininger family, possibly another husband of Mary. One possibility being examined is that a step-father of Edna could have been a backer to help finance the purchase, development and promotion of the initial 70-acres of Yorkshire development.
One of those promotions was a big three-day Yorkshire lot sale, staged June 26th, 27th and 28th of 1924. Initial advertising noted this about The Conrad Realty Company of Harrisonburg, Virginia, who was retained as the selling agent for the three-day Yorkshire lot auction: “This sale may not last three days. We sold 260 lots at ‘Hershey Heights’ on Saturday afternoon, May 24th in 2-1/2 hours in face of a heavy rain storm. What will happen at beautiful ‘Yorkshire’? We don’t know but we predict that these lots will not last but one day. We have 288 lots laid out on this sub-division.”
They did not have the “Hershey success” at Yorkshire. The sale lasted the full three days with the majority of the lots left unsold; this based upon the low deed activity and not a mention by the local papers in the sale’s aftermath. It appears that sale was a flop. I also failed to discover who, if anyone, won the Hudson automobile. Here is the full page advertisement for the third day of that sale, as it appeared in The Gazette and Daily on Saturday morning June 28, 1924.

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Route of the Yorkshire History Walk

Yorkshire History Walk Map (S. H. Smith, 2017)

I’ve been asked to share some stories of the origins of Yorkshire as the lead speaker in a walk thorough that Springettsbury Township community on Saturday June 10th. The walk begins at the Yorkshire Elementary School at 3:00 PM. My comments will serve as an introduction to Yorkshire residents sharing their memories during this stroll through Yorkshire. Brenda Neff is the organizer of this walk and the Yorkshire Memories Facebook page, administered by Kathie Hoffer, has been providing the details; such as meeting place, parking, length of walk and will provide up to the minute info in case the walk has to be postponed due to inclement weather.

The Yorkshire History Walk route has been selected to provide a good mix of architectural variety and history, while avoiding heavily traveled roads. Sidewalks have been selected as much as possible, however please be careful, since there is the occasional uneven sidewalk. Also be aware of the occasional traffic on the roads not having sidewalks.

Click on this link to go to the page showing the full Yorkshire History Walk map. If you click on the map within that page, a higher resolution image is provided.

The main eastern loop walk, with stops 1 through 9, is planned to last about one hour; consisting of 25-minutes walking and 35-minutes at stops. At the conclusion of that walk, those choosing to not continue on the optional western loop walk, have a quick walk back to the starting point via Mills Street.

The optional western loop walk, with stops 10 through 15, is planned to last about 35-minutes; consisting of 15-minutes walking and 20-minutes at stops.

Your comments and stories are welcome along the way. However in consideration to everybody on the walk, so that we conclude in a timely manner, please reframe from overly long comments. The topics associated with the 15-stops are:

  • Stop 1—Who was really behind the initial development of Yorkshire?
  • Stop 2—The Yorkshire Trolley stop on York County’s electric streetcar system.
  • Stop 3—The mystery of the missing section of Greystone Road.
  • Stop 4—In 1925 a church was built on southwest corner of First & Edgewood.
  • Stop 5—Lyndhurst canopy of Sycamore trees with a wide variety of architectural styles.
  • Stop 6—Location and stories of the Yorkshire Ranch barn.
  • Stop 7—Location and stories of the Yorkshire Ranch farmhouse.
  • Stop 8—Restrictions in the earliest Yorkshire deeds.
  • Stop 9—History of the Yorkshire public schoolhouses.
  • Stop 10—Naming of streets in Yorkshire.
  • Stop 11—St. Joseph Church and School move to the suburbs from the city.
  • Stop 12—What’s with the name 3-mile run and why is it underground?
  • Stop 13—Location and stories of Haines Horse Racing Track.
  • Stop 14—Location and stories of Playland Roller Skating and Pool.
  • Stop 15—What’s with the Woozy Moose connection to the 1931 Firehouse?

Links to related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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U.S. WWI declaration to Lafayette, we are here!

General Pershing & his staff at grave of Lafayette on July 4, 1917 (Library of Congress)

The United States entered World War I on April 6, 1917, when Congress approved the declaration of war that President Wilson requested four days earlier. It was still many months before a sizeable American force was stationed in Europe. It was June when the first contingent of 200 United States soldiers boarded a ship, which arrived at St. Nazaire, France on the 26th. By that time France and its allies had been at war, with invading Germany, for nearly three years. French morale was low.

As a moral boost to the locals, the French government asked those initial United States soldiers to march through Paris on July 4, 1917. At the time, the front lines of the German armies were a mere fifty miles away. At the conclusion of the march, the commander of the American Expeditionary Force, General John J. Pershing, and his staff visited the grave of the Marquis de Lafayette at Picpus Cemetery, just outside Paris.

To a sizeable French crowd, it was the words of Pershing’s aide Colonel Charles E. Stanton, who was fluent in French, which produced a stirring response. Stanton ended his address with, “It is with loving pride we drape the colors in tribute of respect to this citizen of your great republic. And here and now in the presence of the illustrious dead we pledge our hearts and our honor in carrying this war to a successful issue.” Then he turned towards the grave, raised his arm and dramatically exclaimed, “Lafayette, we are here!”

This is one of several photos from that visit to Picpus Cemetery on July 4, 1917; it is from the Library of Congress. Closest to Lafayette’s grave is General John J. Pershing, with his hand on his hip. Colonel Charles E. Stanton is third from the left. Stanton’s remarks were originally attributed to Pershing because the press was under a strict censor policy not to print the name and location of any U.S. soldier in Europe, with the only exception, General Pershing.

More Lafayette influences during WWI

American memories of Lafayette’s profound impact on the United States achieving its independence from the British resulted in an immediate small, but growing, outpouring of support for the French during World War I. That group invoked Lafayette’s name in establishing the Lafayette Fund, which started supplying comfort kits to French soldiers within months after war broke out in 1914.

A group of American pilots volunteered their talents well before the United States entered the war. That squadron of pilots took the name Lafayette Escadrille as they flew missions for France.

The July 4, 1917 visit to the grave of Lafayette by American soldiers resulted in everything from related posters in France to “Lafayette, We Are Here” songs in America. I’ll post the words and music to one of those songs closer to July 4th. For now, here is a 1917 French WWI poster by Eugene Courboin, with Uncle Sam shaking hands with a Lafayette monument.

Links to related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Earliest plans for Yorkshire on the Lincoln Highway

Blueprint of R. B. McKinnon plan of Yorkshire, dated May 3, 1924 (Submitted)

I’ve been asked to share some stories of the origins of Yorkshire as the lead speaker in a walk thorough that Springettsbury Township community on Saturday June 10th. My comments will serve as an introduction to Yorkshire residents sharing their memories during this stroll through Yorkshire. Brenda Neff is the organizer of this walk and the Yorkshire Memories Facebook page, administered by Kathie Hoffer, is providing the details; such as meeting place, parking, length of walk and up to the minute info in case the walk has to be postponed due to inclement weather.

A reader submitted scans of the blueprint for the initial R. B. McKinnon plan of the Yorkshire development in Springettsbury Township. The plans are dated May 3, 1924, and they are recorded in York County Deed Book 22R, Page 701. This plan of the initial 288 lots in Yorkshire is essential in understanding lot locations per early deeds, where lot numbers on the general plan of lots, per Deed Book 22R, Page 701, are referenced extensively. Robert B. McKinnon [1865-1929] was a Civil Engineer. He was the long-time York City Engineer and/or York County Surveyor.

Further research at the Recorder of Deeds Office revealed the York City Planning Commission approved the Yorkshire plan on June 23, 1924. I’ve more research planned, however it appears some lots were sold, although not many, prior to Mahlon Haines purchasing the Yorkshire development as one component of his 318-acre Yorkshire Ranch; a group of land purchases, made by Mahlon, during October and November of 1924.

Enlarged sections of Plan No. 1 for Yorkshire

The following is the enlarged East Half of Yorkshire Plan No. 1.

The following is the enlarged West Half of Yorkshire Plan No. 1. I’ve provided some overlap between the east and west sections.

Note the trolley tracks on the south side of East Market Street. It appears the Yorkshire trolley stop was on Market Street, between Lyndhurst and Pinehurst Streets. Do any of my readers remember using the trolley from that location?

Links to related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Mystery of the Druck Valley Barn

Barn along Druck Valley Road in Springettsbury Township, York County, PA (Artwork submitted by Cliff Satterthwaite)

The first time I stopped by the home of Cliff Satterthwaite in Virginia, I instantly recognized much of the artwork covering the walls. In addition to local Fredericksburg scenes, artwork of Pennsylvania sites from all around York City and County was very evident.

Artwork of a barn along Druck Valley Road began with an on-location pleinair pencil & paper drawing in 1964. Cliff asked if I would send him a photo of what the barn presently looked like.

The barn was vaguely familiar to me however its precise location remained a mystery until last week, during an e-mail exchange where Cliff shared a miniature take on one of his favorite York scenes. Even though a misunderstanding about the Druck Valley Barn was resolved, the barn location could still not be ascertained; however the corrected clue in concert with an historic aerial photo solved the two-year-old mystery of the Druck Valley Barn.

The Cliff Satterthwaite artwork is used with his permission.  Cliff lived in York County, PA, from the mid-1950s to the early-1980s, creating a host of artwork, with much done live on location.  He has a book available containing nearly 400 images of his artwork from that time period;  e-mail contact is  monsterart4grani@aol.com

The Druck Valley Barn mystery is solved

The misunderstanding involved East versus West. For some reason, it stuck in my mind that Cliff told me the barn was east of the Glades Auction house. Last week it was discovered that I misunderstood, I should have been looking a short distance west of the Glades Auction house.

I walked along Druck Valley Road, west from the Glades, however still was not able to pinpoint a location. I’ve used aerial photos a lot in YorksPast posts, including trying to use them to find the mystery barn east of the Glades. In the following August 11, 1971, historic aerial photo I’ve encircled the unique aerial shape of the barn, per Cliff’s drawing. The Druck Valley Barn is located 500-feet west of the Glades and the aerial photo shows a path leading from that barn to the farmhouse at 3373 Druck Valley Road.

1971 and 2017 Aerial Views along Druck Valley Road, west of the Glades in Springettsbury Township, York County, PA (1971 from York County Archives & 2017 Google Earth; Annotated by S. H. Smith, 2017)

The barn location is transposed onto a 2017 Google Earth view, which shows the barn no longer standing at the western corner of the entrance drive to the First Baptist Church of York. The church acquired land to build back off of Druck Valley Road in 2000.

The files of the Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Committee does contain the following 3373 Druck Valley Road property photo; a 1994 northeast view of the barn ruins, with only a small portion of the lower level still standing and utilized as a garage. Therefore the barn was removed well before the church built in this area. Do any of my readers know when this barn was removed?

Cliff Satterthwaite had a 1973 photo of the Druck Valley Barn. I’ve combined it with a present photo from the same viewpoint for the following “Then & Now.”

Then & Now—Westward view of Druck Valley Barn (1973 Photo by C. Satterthwaite and 2017 Photo by S. H. Smith)

Links to related posts:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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York County abodes of Judge Nevin Wanner

Judge Nevin Wanner (1940 Photo from Collections of York County History Center)

The York City residence of Judge Nevin Wanner was located at 406 East Market Street; he lived there for nearly 60-years. As an occasional respite from city life Judge Wanner spent summers at his island in the Susquehanna River and he also utilized a residence in the East York suburbs. Each of these three abodes of Judge Wanner has an interesting story.

Nevin M. Wanner was born in 1850. He graduated from Franklin & Marshall College in 1870 and received a Law Degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1872. His first job was with the Law offices of Erastus H. Weiser, Esq. in York, PA.

In 1873, Nevin passed the Bar exam and had a flourishing law practice, including a stint as District Attorney of York County from 1887 through 1890. Attorney Wanner became the regional solicitor for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, the Northern Central Railway Company, and lines controlled by them in York, Adams, Cumberland and Perry Counties. Wanner was the initial local lawyer representing The Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Company; used by John H. Longstreet for the development of East York in Springettsbury Township.

Nevin’s 33-years as a lawyer was just a start, he followed it with 20-years of service on the York County bench. He served as a Judge in the Court of Common Pleas from 1906 until his retirement at the end of 1925.

After his retirement as President Judge, Wanner continued to serve as adviser, as requested by the courts. Into his 90s, Nevin Wanner was unceasing in championing the quality growth of the York County Law Library and in supporting civic causes that promoted the public good.

The abodes of Judge Nevin Wanner

The origin of the suburb known as East York in Springettsbury Township dates to September 2, 1903, when the plan for this suburban community was formally issued by The Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Company. John H. Longstreet was a principal in that company, which originated in Philadelphia, but now also had an office in York, PA.

The first house to be built in the East York community was a double-house built near the middle of the development. Ground was broken in 1903 and John Longstreet and his family occupied one side of this dwelling in 1904; with the address: 26 North Findlay Street. Initially the other side, 28 North Findlay Street, was supposedly rented out, as a suburban retreat, for the family of Nevin Wanner, the local attorney representing The Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Company. That double-house, shown in the following 1994 photo, is one of the contributing structures in the Old East York Historic District, which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 12, 1999.

26 & 28 North Findlay Street (1994 Photo by Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Committee)

On November 7, 1905, Nevin Wanner won election to serve as a Judge in the Court of Common Pleas. Oral history has Nevin Wanner continuing to rent 28 North Findlay Street, as a suburban retreat, for a number of years. The earliest deed, where John H. Longstreet sells the 28 North Findlay Street property occurred on November 1, 1910; per Deed Book 17Z, Page 46. The sale is to Charles K. Baumeister, a 37-year-old bookkeeper.

Mr. Baumeister next sells 28 North Findlay Street to William S. Wanner on August 27, 1924; per Deed Book 22W, Page 211. William S. Wanner is the nephew of Judge Nevin Wanner. This is actually 29-year-old William S. Wanner, Jr., since he is is the son of Nevin Wanner’s brother, William S. Wanner, who died in 1914. Per oral history, during the next 15-years, when William owned the property, his uncle Nevin Wanner visited quite often.

Arlene Imes provided an interview on July 21, 1998, which contributed to the National Register application. The maiden name of Mrs. Imes is Dietz; she started first grade at East York’s Hiestand School during 1922. Arlene later became a teacher at that school and was an excellent oral history resource about the East York community.

The following is a circa 1930 aerial photo showcasing the extent of houses built in the near vicinity of the 28 & 26 North Findlay Street double-house, a quarter century after the development began. The houses with the biggest trees are the oldest, since the site of East York was originally a planted farmers field. The photo is a zoomed-in section of an overall aerial photo initially presented in the post Karl Ort’s aerial photo of East York.

Zooming in on Karl Ort’s aerial photo of East York (Collections of York County History Center; Annotated by S. H. Smith, 2017)

The next post in this series will examine the 406 East Market Street home of Nevin Wanner, which stood opposite the end of Broad Street.

Links to related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Dallastown Furniture Factory was WWI Army supplier

Then & Now photos of Dallastown Furniture Factory (ca. 1920 photo from York County History Center; arrangement by S. H. Smith, 2017)

“Then & Now” photos show the buildings originally built in 1911 as the Dallastown Furniture Factory in Dallastown, York County, PA. The Dallastown Furniture Company produced driver seats for WWI army wagons within these buildings.

The “Then” photo is circa 1920; at that time, the factory could be located as being on the northeast corner of North Park Street and the Ma & Pa Railroad 1.2-mile branch into Dallastown. The boxcar sits on the furniture factory rail siding.

The railroad tracks were removed years ago. “Now” the former furniture factory buildings can be located via the northeast corner of North Park Street and East Locust Street in Dallastown.

The April 2, 1918 issue of The York Daily reported: “The Dallastown Furniture Company today received specification and prints covering contracts for fifteen hundred driver seats for army wagons. These specifications and prints were received from the war service committee. Just as soon as the material is received work will be started on this large contract.”

History of the Dallastown Furniture Factory

The charter for the Dallastown Furniture Company was issued on January 31, 1911; “For the purpose of manufacturing and selling all kinds and descriptions of household and office furniture and all other articles of a cognate character, from wood and metal or from either wood or metal.” Alvin F. Fix was the founding company president.

Charles Williams, of Jacobus, was selected as architect and superintendent for the construction of the new factory on a lot purchased at the northeast corner of North Park Street and the Ma & Pa Railroad in Dallastown. Godfred Druck, J. H. Myers and Allen Bupp served on the building committee. Fravel Seitz, J. C. Heckert, Charles Kohler and L. Tarbet were the members of the equipment committee; selecting the machinery to fill the factory.

The factory was is full operation by September of 1911. With business good and the factory at full capacity, in October of 1915, company president A. F. Fix announced they plan “to construct an addition, 100 x 120 ft., two stories, of brick construction, which will double its capacity.” When this addition was completed in 1916, the factory employment reached 100 men. The factory workers earned between 12 and 25 cents per hour, depending upon their skill level.

The 1916 addition appears at the right side of the “Then & Now” photos. I’ve utilized elements on Sheet 10 from the July 1929 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of Dallastown, PA, to assemble a continuous single plan view of the factory while annotating the Ma & Pa Railroad tracks in the area. The Sanborn map section is from Penn State Libraries on-line digital collection of older Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps.

Assembled from Sheet 10 of the July 1929 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of Dallastown, PA (Source: Penn State Libraries on-line digital collections; Annotated by S. H. Smith, 2017)

The smokestack at the Dallastown Furniture Factory was 90-feet tall. Coal and scrap wood were burned to fire a boiler, which in turn powered a stationary steam engine that drove the line shafts throughout the factory.

During the Great Depression, people and businesses made due with their old furniture, for longer and longer periods of time. The Dallastown Furniture Company was one of the casualties; and in 1937 the company elected to dissolve voluntarily and wind up the company’s affairs. These over one-hundred-year-old factory buildings in Dallastown still stand and continue to be utilized by other businesses.

Links to related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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