Metal building pioneer Howard Carew

Howard J. Carew was one of the 13-founding-members of the Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA). Howard took an active role in that national organization; serving as its leader in 1961. He also served on the Technical Committee for many years. The MBMA metal building systems design manual helped lead to the recognition and acceptance of metal building systems; which remain prevalent today.

The Carew Corporation plant was located at the eastern end of Industrial Highway in Springettsbury Township. I’ve annotated a circa 1955 northwestward aerial view from the collections of the York County History Center. Click on this LINK for a Full View of the illustration in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of illustration.

Tom Landis contacted me in October. He wanted to know the story about the Quonset huts that were part of the York-Shipley plant in Springettsbury Township. He also commented “I’ve seen your talk on the Top 50 York County Manufacturers in 1899. How about selecting the top Springettsbury Township manufacturers and write about them?” I’d been considering that, and so, with this post I begin a new YorksPast series.

Howard Joseph Carew was born in 1911. He graduated from Princeton University in 1933 and served in the U.S. Navy from 1941 until 1946. Howard immediately established a York County business during 1946. The initial plant was located at 1336 Spahn Avenue in Spring Garden Township, York County, PA. In a 1948 interview, Howard stated, “Five categories of steel structures are now being fabricated in the Carew plant. These are: steel framing for all types of buildings, standard truss roof buildings, steel roofs, steel trusses, and the well-known Quonset type of building.”

Carew supplied the Quonset huts at York-Shipley and for the US Naval Reserve in Springettsbury Township. The Quonset huts were a very brief part of their business and as sales of their new types of metal buildings took off, Howard moved the business to an 18-acre site, which allowed construction of a rail siding. In 1953, they moved into that new plant, which is now numbered 3491 Industrial Highway, in Springettsbury Township. The equipment within the 50,000-square-feet fabrication plant was recognized as the finest and most modern in the country.

Howard Carew began purchasing the 18-acres in 1952; under the name Highland Industries. He only utilized 6-acres for his plant and the remainder became Highland Industrial Park; one of the earliest industrial parks in York County.

The Carew plant employed two shifts of over 100-workers. Carew system buildings predominantly appear in states East of the Mississippi, however they were also shipped further west and abroad. Carew buildings are as close as the nearby Caterpillar Tractor plant, and a varied as the 6000-seat Stabler Arena at Lehigh University.

In 1982, the second-generation management decided to discontinue manufacturing operations. A public auction of all equipment within the Carew plant was held on February 11, 1982. The plant, on 6-acres, is still utilized as one of the buildings within Highland Industrial Park.

Links to other Springettsbury Township manufacturers and related posts:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Insane-Asylum fire in the Hellam Hills

Location map with overlay of 1963 S. H. Smith note about Wild Cat Resorts (S. H. Smith, 2017)

During 1963, when I turned 14-years-old, while at an end-of-winter weekend at my Grandfather Smith’s bungalow near Accomac, I went on a walk exploring areas around Wild Cat Falls and up along Wild Cat Run that were normally off-limits. Old-timers from several other bungalows joined us; it was a walk filled with fascinating recollections that I was hearing for the first time.

A day after that 1963 walk, I wrote a sentence or two about each of those stories, thinking I could use them in my Junior High history class; however I never did. They remained dormant, for 54-years, until I discovered their hiding place this past summer. I explored a few of those memories in my talks at the York Daily Record’s Weird York event at DreamWrights on December 6th. This is the first of a series of posts exploring the remaining items that I penned in 1963.

The no-longer-existing resorts at Wild Cat Falls, in Hellam Township, York County, were filled with hundreds of visitors during each summer weekend in the late 1800s and early 1900s. What did they do for entertainment? Several of the older men on the walk told about all the ghost stories that were made up at those resorts. At that time, the details of the ghost stories did not interest me that much; since I only wrote in general, “A favorite resort pastime was making up ghost stories. The best ones usually poked fun at the locale and included a fire or falling tree.”

“The Seven Gates of Hell” urban legend, based on a fictional insane-asylum fire in a nearly section of Hellam Township, seems to match the type of ghost story that was hatched at the Wild Cat resorts, a century ago.

The location map shows the relative proximity of sites, plus I provided an overlay of my 1963 note. Click on this LINK for a Full View of the illustration in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of the illustration.

The Hellam Township web site contains a page explaining the urban legend: “Perhaps the most notorious of Hellam’s mysterious and spooky places is that part of the Township known as “The Seven Gates of Hell” … An insane asylum supposedly located there caught fire, allowing the inmates to escape, but seven gates surrounding the asylum trapped them and many were burned or were killed or lived on to stalk and murder.” There are also more gruesome variations of the ghost story; floating around on the Internet and in books of the day.

The legend persists because years ago a gate near Trout Run Road was dubbed the first gate in “The Seven Gates of Hell.” The remaining six gates are explained away as being invisible. I wonder how the originator storyteller would feel, knowing their ghost story has endured for more than a century.

Links to related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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The boarded up house in Springettsbury

I received an unexpected reaction to last weeks post: General Gordon napped at 3103 East Market Street. This post answers that inquiry and also provides additional details about Albert Smyser’s prized horse; stolen by the confederate troops when they invaded York County during 1863.

A reader inquired why the house at 3103 East Market Street is boarded up; commenting, “it seems totally out of place, on a main street in the suburbs!” The split screen image shows the house in 1947 and now in 2017. Click on this LINK for a Full View of the illustration in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of illustration.

This house has been unoccupied for many years. During which, the owner did little maintenance; allowing years of rainwater to get into the interior via major roof leaks, failed spouting and clogged gutters.

In 2014, the owner allowed Brookline Builders, a Historic Preservation Contractor, to examine the house and provide her with an estimate of the needs of the building. Brookline noted because of the prolonged wet interior conditions: (1) “The second floor joists have rotted and the bricks they rested on have and are falling away,” and (2) “The first floor joists are falling and need to be supported temporarily very soon or they will collapse into the basement.”

Since the owner chose not to stabilize the house, Springettsbury Township required the house to be boarded up for safety reasons.

Additional details about Albert Smyser’s prized horse, stolen by the confederate troops in 1863, are provided in Scott Mingus’ book “Flames Beyond Gettysburg.” In the first paragraph of his Chapter 10 ‘Gordon Attacks Wrightsville,’ Mingus notes, prior to marching to Wrightsville, General Gordon and his staff dined at a farmhouse called “The Cedars.”

With the newspaper find in last weeks post, we now know that farmhouse is the boarded up house at 3103 East Market Street. The just of Mingus’ description matches that provided by Bob Smyser; i.e. concerning the theft and return of Albert Smyser’s prized horse—on the day the confederates marched to Wrightsville; i.e. June 28th, 1863.

On page 190 of “Flames Beyond Gettysburg,” Mingus’ notes Albert Smyser’s prized 3-year-old horse was again stolen on June 29th as the confederates returned from Wrightsville. The source is York County Damage Claims: “Albert Herman Smyser filed a $175 claim for White’s Cavalry taking his “3-yr-old black horse,” with John McConnel present when it was taken.

How did Albert Smyser get back his prized horse, the second time? Maybe the answer to that question contributes to the Smyser lore about that horse?

Links to related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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General Gordon napped at 3103 East Market Street

Bob Smyser had a passing interest in family history when he was given a box of papers, recently discovered by his dad; it contained family history research, started by his dad’s grandmother. I met Bob at my family history talk near Pittsburgh last month. He shared a Civil War era story from those papers about his ancestor, Albert Smyser:

“When the rebels invaded York County, a prized horse, belonging to Albert Smyser was stolen by the confederate troops. Sarah Smyser, the mother of Albert , was promised no property would be taken in exchange for providing the use of her home to the rebel General for a midday nap and meal before his troops marched towards the Susquehanna. Upon the General being made aware the horse was taken, he ordered it returned. Albert got back the horse; whose offspring, became part of Smyser lore.”

Bob wanted to know if I could uncover the Smyser lore associated with the offspring of that horse. I was not successful; both via online and via Smyser family histories at the York County History Center. However I did quickly discover where the home of Sarah Smyser was located via the series of “Historic York County” photos published in The Gazette and Daily during the late 1940s. Click on this LINK for a Full View of the illustration in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of illustration. The caption for the December 5, 1947, photo is:

“GEN. GORDON SLEPT HERE—The Cedars, once the home of Daniel Smyser, where Confederate Gen. John B. Gordon stopped for the night while leading his troops through York to Wrightsville on Sunday, June 28, 1863. Smyser had fled across the Susquehanna with all movable valuables and most of the livestock before the Confederate troops, under Generals Jubal Early and Gordon, came through in an unsuccessful attempt to take Philadelphia. Gordon is said to have thanked Mrs. Smyser for the hospitality of her house, before leaving, and told her to report any property loss to him. When her son Albert Herman Smyser found his riding horse missing immediately after the departure of the troops, he is said to have ridden out to Gen. Gordon. Gordon ordered an orderly to find and return the horse, which was done. The Cedars, now the residence of Mrs. Tom Myers, is on the north side of Lincoln Highway, east. Just east of Springetts Fire house.”

This house still stands at 3103 East Market Street. I remember the pictured stonewall; that was in front of the house, before East Market Street was widened to 4-lanes. The high red brick retaining wall now fronts the home, which is now boarded up and in imminent danger of collapse.

The copywriter for the photo caption did introduce several inaccuracies. General Gordon did not stop for the night; since his troops entered York in the morning of June 28th while continuing east, camping out east of York until 2:00PM; when they broke camp and marched to Wrightsville. Sarah’s husband Daniel Smyser, died while ploughing a field on March 26, 1862. Daniel’s family continued to live in the house as the ownership passed to John Smyser; the brother of Daniel. In 1869, Albert Smyser acquires the house.

I’ve wrote several posts about that house on May 4, 5, 6 & 7 during 2014; here are the links to them:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Mahlon Haines movie at the Elmwood Theatre

Bill Hoffmeyer shared he saw the Paramount movie which starred Mahlon Haines at the Elmwood Theatre (now the Belmont Theatre) back in the 50s. Bill wrote, “I still remember Mr. Haines jogging down the aisle to introduce the short movie.”

Mahlon Haines, of Shoe House fame, starred in a Paramount movie that was shown around the nation. The title of the 10-minute short is “The Spirit of Seventy.” It was shown prior to featured attractions between 1953 and 1955.

Mahlon N. Haines’ entry in “The National Cyclopedia of American Biography” contains the following sentence: “In 1953, he starred in a movie, ‘The Spirit of Seventy,’ which espoused the wisdom of physical exercise.” This movie is listed in the catalog of copyright entries for motion pictures: “The Spirit of Seventy” was copyrighted by Paramount Pictures Corporation on October 2, 1953. On a Turner Classic Movies message board it shows up as a 1953 short film, produced and directed by Herman Justin; whose shorts were usually 10-minues long, for Paramount Pacemaker.

I searched the newspaper microfilms at the York County History Center for an Elmwood Theatre ad after October 2, 1953. The illustration contains the top and bottom parts of such an ad from the October 19, 1953 issue of The Gazette and Daily. Click on this LINK for a Full View of the illustration in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of the illustration.

The Elmwood Theatre ad notes this about “The Spirit of Seventy” movie, “See Colonel Mahlon N. Haines in action with the Three Quarter Century Baseball Team at St. Petersburg, Fla. The Colonel is 78, you must be over 70 to be a member of the team.”

Haines maintained a winter home in Snell Isle, outside of St. Petersburg, Florida. Mahlon N. Haines’ entry in “The National Cyclopedia of American Biography” notes he was a founder of that Team. The early Teams had an average age of around 75-years-old, hence the name. Later the Team only included players over 75-years-old. It was a winter league amongst teams formed from these players.

Mahlon Haines was the home run king of the league for many years and he initially retired when he was 83-years-old; with a .593 batting average during his final year. However Haines announced, “If any 83-year-older exceeds that mark, he’ll return to the diamond.” At the age of 86, Haines was good on his word, coming out of retirement for a final year; that year attaining a .655 batting average. He attributed his success to staying physically fit and abstaining from alcohol and tobacco for his entire life.

Links to related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Hoard of gold and silver buried in York County

A September 7th, 1908 article, in The York Daily, describes another attempt to find the Rankin Treasure in York County, PA. This tale of buried treasure is one of those Weird York curiosities that just might still be true.

James Rankin allegedly quickly buried a hoard of gold and silver on his York County property in 1778, just prior to being arrested and jailed in York Town as a “traitor.” Click on this LINK for a Full View of the illustration in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of illustration.

Rankin had remained a British loyalist during the Revolutionary War and was dubbed a “traitor” when he became involved in a conspiracy to bring the British troops across the Susquehanna River at the time when the Continental Congress was meeting in York Town during 1777-78. James escaped from jail and fled to the safety of British troops and thence to England; evidently planning an eventual return, to claim his buried treasure after the rebellion was squashed.

Prior to the Revolutionary War, James Rankin was one of the wealthiest landholders in York County. The “American Loyalist Papers, Vol. 42, Folio 132” list 20 properties belonging to James Rankin. Property #1 on this list is the 377-acre property that includes the Grist Mill later known as Loucks Mill; which was located where Route 30 presently crosses the Codorus Creek. James Rankin’s 377-acres on this main property extended from the Codorus Creek eastward to the present eastern boundaries of the Harley-Davidson property, northward to Paradise Road and southward slightly past Mill Creek. Rankin purchased these 377-acres at Sheriff Sale on October 27, 1772, for 1,564 Pounds. While Rankin was not the original mill owner, records show he made significant improvements during his ownership.

Early in 1778, laws were enacted allowing estates of “traitors” to be forfeited. The 377-acre property, with improved Grist Mill, was exposed to public sale at the Court House in York Town on October 14, 1778. Conrad Leatherman was the winning bidder at 35,201 Pounds, with the proceeds split between the State and National Treasuries. Several other individuals would own the Grist Mill property until the first of four generations of the Loucks family became the owners in 1805.

The 1908 article in The York Daily provides details about the renewed interest in finding the Rankin Treasure: “Several years ago [i.e. prior to 1908], while plowing in a field west of the railroad at Loucks’ Mill, a laborer saw a small disc lying on the ground and picking it up saw that it was a coin, but was unable to tell of what value. Several took the coin to a jeweler and learned that it was an English guinea, equivalent to five dollars in the United States money. When it was learned that the coin had been found in the field, there was a rush of people, all eager to share in the supposed hidden treasure, however, none of them ever was known to have had any success in his quest.”

The search for buried treasure in 1908 was the latest in a sequence of searches, usually triggered by finding yet another English coin. The 1908 article concluded by noting the son of James Rankin returned after the Revolutionary War and supposedly secured the treasure his father had hidden, as he spent money before his return to England in a lavish manner, not in proportion to his means upon his arrival at this place. With coins still sporadically appearing in fields over 100-years later, maybe the son did not retrieve all of the Rankin Treasure.

This tale of buried treasure is one of those Weird York County curiosities that just might still be true. Did the son of James Rankin secure all of the treasure his father buried? Or, is some of that treasure still to be found?

A collection of Weird York County curiosities will be presented during the December 6th evening to unravel York County history (part 3). I will be one of five local historians participating; along with June Lloyd, Scott Mingus, Jeri Jones and Jim McClure.

The event is at a new location this year; DreamWrights Center for Community Arts at 100 Carlisle Avenue in York; with parking to the rear of the building. The program starts on December 6, 2017, at 7:00PM. Tickets are $10 for general admission and can be purchased at this site. Do not put off purchasing your tickets; the event is approaching a sell-out.

Links to related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Articles adopted 240 years ago in York Town

The courthouse on the square in York Town, Pennsylvania, was the site where Continental Congress adopted the “Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union between the States” on November 15, 1777; 240-years-ago from the date of this post.

This 13-cent United States Postage Stamp was issued in 1977; commemorating the 200th anniversary of the drafting and adoption of the Articles of Confederation in York, PA. The Articles brought the thirteen states, in revolt against England, together as a united group of states; be it a loose confederation. Click on this LINK for a Full View of the illustration in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of illustration.

The colonies had just broken from England because they detested the heavy-handed rule by England. As a result, in creating the Articles, the states were not about to give their new federal government strong power.

The Articles set Congress as the only branch of government. Congress could sign treaties, declare war, borrow money, but could not tax. Congress relied upon voluntary contributions from state governments. Congress could pass bills affecting states and individuals; however Congress had no power to enforce them. Even so, passing bills was a challenge in itself; for at least 9 of the 13 states had to agree to any bill for it to pass in Congress.

Nevertheless, the Articles of Confederation were very important in the young history of this country; they served as the framework of the United States federal government for 12-years. The Articles major value was holding all the states together in a mutually beneficial arrangement until the present United States Constitution, with stronger federal government, went into effect on March 4, 1789.

Links to stamp related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Playboy radio at York’s Lincoln Highway Service Station

The several Lincoln Highway slides I include within my History of the Susquehanna Trail presentation always produce related questions; such as this one from Fred Hoover: “Where was the Lincoln Highway Garage that sold radios? My father always claimed it was in West York. Dad went with my grandfather when they bought their first radio there in the late 20s.” I keep a list of the questions I can’t answer on the spot. A year later, while doing other research in the York County History Center newspaper microfilms, I happened upon an ad with this answer for Fred.

York directories indicated the Lincoln Highway Service Station was in business at 624 West Market Street from the early 20s until the early 30s. Being in business for only a decade, obviously it was not as well known at the Lincoln Highway Garage on East Market Street.

The November 6, 1931, ad in The Gazette and Daily indicates the Lincoln Highway Service Station sold Crosley Radios. The ad specifically featured the $49.75 Playboy radio. Click on this LINK for a Full View of the illustrations in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of illustrations.

The eight tubes and superheterodyne circuit in The Crosley Playboy radio were claimed “so sensitive that stations can be heard with the use of the Crosley Tennaboard as an aerial. This makes it easily portable—simply carry it from room to room and plug in the light socket.”

I though it weird that service stations sold home radios. However a little research showed Crosley Radios were sold at many service stations, garages and automobile dealerships around the country; such as this 1931 ad for the same radio offered by the J. B. Cooper Motor Company in North Carolina.

Links to related Lincoln Highway posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Weird York topics from YorksPast

The December 6th evening to unravel York County history is Retro York’s 2017 third-edition of the annual York Daily Record event. The theme this year is Weird York. I will be one of five local historians participating.

The event is at a new location this year; DreamWrights Center for Community Arts at 100 Carlisle Avenue in York. The program starts on December 6, 2017, at 7:00PM. Tickets are $10 for general admission and can be purchased at this site.

A little background on the two topics I’ll be presenting. For me, during the 50s and early 60s, summer weekends often included a visit to the Smith bungalow, of my Grandfather; located along the Susquehanna River; west of Accomac. Many family gatherings of 30, or more, were typical. We usually went on at least two big walks each bungalow weekend; one eastward to Accomac and one westward to Wild Cat Falls.

During 1963, when I turned 14-years-old, I helped with the end-of-winter bungalow clean-up weekends for the first time. One of those weekends included an expanded walk exploring areas around Wild Cat Falls and up along Wild Cat Run that were normally off-limits.

Old-timers from several other bungalows joined us; it was a walk filled with fascinating tales I was hearing for the first time. A day after that 1963 walk, I wrote a sentence or two about each of those stories, thinking I could use them in my Junior High history class; however I never did. They remained dormant, for all those years, until I researched the tales during the past few weeks.

I was delighted to find most of the stories are backed up with multiple primary sources and many neat finds, such that the research will be rolled out as one of my new presentations in 2018. On December 6th, at the Weird York event, I’ll be sharing a few highlights in two areas:

(1) Wild Cat in the Hellam Hills … examines the naming origin of Wild Cat Falls and the multiple resorts located at Wild Cat Glen. Individuals, primarily from Lancaster County, heavily promoted that scenic wonder much more so than the locals. Isn’t that a little weird, Lancaster County heavily promoting a York County attraction?

(2) Reservoirs in the Hellam Hills … collected pristine water and via gravity it was piped under the Susquehanna River into Lancaster County. The Marietta Gravity Water Company sold some of that water back to York County river bungalows; isn’t that a little weird.

I searched for the word “weird” in all my previous posts. It showed up in the following posts associated with a ghost at the Longstown One-Room Schoolhouse. I’ve also included the link to my post about the Smith bungalow.

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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York-Shipley connections

My post Quonset huts of York-Shipley in Springettsbury resulted in many reader comments; among them were a host of York-Shipley connections questions: Is Sam Shipley, the president of York-Shipley, related to William Shipley who championed the York Plan during WWII? Is there a York-Shipley connection to York Corporation? Are any offshoots of York-Shipley still in business in York County? Am I correct about York-Shipley having a connection to York Barbell? In a word, Yes, to all these questions.

A nice way to illustrate some of the key connections is via this photo, which I use in several of the variations of my talks about York Corporation and its predecessors. It shows Shipley men at the York Manufacturing Company during 1916. From only 50-employees prior to the hiring of Tom Shipley as General Manager of the York Manufacturing Company in 1897, under Tom’s leadership the company streamlined product offering to Tom’s designs and exceeded 500-employees after only two years. By 1917, the company eclipsed 50% of all United States ice making machinery business.

Tom Shipley hired two of his brothers and three of his sons to work at the York Manufacturing Company; they were all graduate engineers trained in refrigeration. The Bottom row shows Tom Shipley, with his younger brothers William to the left and Samuel to the right. The top row shows sons of Tom Shipley; from left to right: Samuel, Raymond and Howard. Click on this LINK for a Full View of the illustration in this post if details are cut off in the cropping of the illustration.

Samuel is the most common name within the Shipley family of York County. This name comes from Samuel Shipley [1829-1892]; a Jersey City, NJ policeman and the father of four sons: Tom, Samuel, William and their brother John; who was a career fireman in Bayonne, New Jersey. Samuel H. Shipley [1896-1975], the second son of Tom Shipley (in the upper left), was the Shipley responsible for establishing York-Shipley.

In 1926, Thomas Shipley, Inc. was established as a holding company for Tom’s stock in sales businesses associated with the York Manufacturing Company. To this holding company other companies, originated by Tom, were added: the Roosevelt Garage and Supply Company which became part of Roosevelt Oil Service, and a Canadian affiliate of the York Manufacturing Company, which Tom owned outright.

After Tom Shipley died in 1930, his brother William S. Shipley becomes the new President of the York Ice Machinery Company, leading the company through the rapid switch away from ice making into air conditioning products and then championing the York Plan during WWII.

Tom Shipley’s son Raymond T. Shipley left the company after the death of his father and started his own refrigeration company in New England, financed via Thomas Shipley, Inc. Samuel H. Shipley and Howard V. Shipley climbed up through company management at York, with Sam rising to the position of General Manager, once held by his father. When it became clear that Stewart Lauer was being groomed to replace their Uncle William S. Shipley, as president of the company, Samuel and Howard Shipley decided to resign their positions at the company and focus on growing the holdings of Thomas Shipley, Inc.

In 1938, the opportunity arose to buy the York Oil Burner Company from Ed Kraber and Bob Hoffman. Samuel and Howard Shipley sold some of the York stock within the Thomas Shipley, Inc. holding company to purchase the York Oil Burner Company. As a result of that purchase, Bob Hoffman had the capital to start York Barbell Company.

Howard V. Shipley moved to Canada and became president the refrigeration company started by his father. Samuel H. Shipley managed the holding company, Thomas Shipley, Inc., and the two operating companies, York Oil Burner Company and Roosevelt Oil Service.

During WWII, Sam Shipley wanted to brand their products, made for the war effort, as proudly Made-in-York by Shipley. York-Shipley, Inc. was the new company name effective November 1, 1943. York-Shipley merged Thomas Shipley, Inc. and its completely owned subsidiary, Roosevelt Oil Service, with the York Oil Burner Company. For many years following the war, York-Shipley advertising material carried the slogan: “Made in York, Pennsylvania . . . the Community of Craftsmen.”

In 1969, locally owned York-Shipley merged with outside investors. From that time on, the local plant along North Hills Road in Springettsbury Township, in a string of merged companies, was on a roller-coaster ride; ultimately mostly downhill.

Just prior to the 1969 merger, the Shipley-Humble Oil Division of York-Shipley was spun off. That is the entity that continues to operate today as Shipley Energy in York County. The oil division traces their origins back to the Roosevelt Oil Service established by Tom Shipley in 1929. Now you know why the company convenience stores are called Toms.

Links to related posts:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

Posted in all posts, Buildings, Businesses, Family Histories, Manufacturing, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Roads, Talks, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on York-Shipley connections