Newly Completed Susquehanna Trail teems with Historical Scenes

Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement: Part 16

Article in July 27, 1924 issue of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, New York City

Article in July 27, 1924 issue of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, New York City

The completion of Susquehanna Trail, during July of 1924, was met with a promotional blitz by the Publicity Bureau of the Williamsport Chamber of Commerce. They sent out press releases and promotional ads to newspapers all over the East Coast. Here is the resulting article in the July 27, 1924 issue of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle:

New Susquehanna Trail Teems With Historical Scenes for Motor Tourists

Residents of Brooklyn and eastern New York State will be glad to learn that the Susquehanna Trail, a practically solid concrete highway connecting Buffalo and Niagara Falls with Washington D.C., is now complete in its entire length of 450 miles, the last detour having been removed last week. Motorists should plan now to take a trip over the Trail in the near future, as the wonderful scenery to be found along the route is at its best from the latter part of July to the early part of October.

The following ad appeared in the same issue of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle:

Ad in July 27, 1924 issue of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, New York City

Ad in July 27, 1924 issue of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, New York City

Note that in 1924, the Publicity Bureau of the Williamsport Chamber of Commerce continues to use the map created in 1923 when they were trying to get the Susquehanna Trail shifted from a York route to a Gettysburg route; see the post: York is In Danger of Losing the Susquehanna Trail during 1923.

The officially designated Alternate Susquehanna Trail route from Harrisburg, through Gettysburg and Frederick, to Washington, D.C. becomes the preferred Trail route of the Williamsport Chamber of Commerce. They heavily promoted this Alternate Susquehanna Trail route, long after the Trail officially opened; many times not even indicating the primary Susquehanna Trail route went through York.

Next Friday, this series will continue on the Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement.

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 20 . . Europe . . Part 3

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 20 . . . Europe add 2 blanks after GOLD

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 20 . . . Europe

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century. This is Part 3 of Chapter 20 . . . Europe. A new part will be posted every Thursday. Recent chapters stand alone, starting here; however new readers may want to start at the beginning.

Continue reading “RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 20 . . Europe . . Part 3” »

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#14 Baugher, Kurtz & Stewart; The Prominent Foundry along the Codorus in York

Northeast looking photo of the Codorus Boat Basin & Foundry Plaza in York, PA (Photo & Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

Northeast looking photo of the Codorus Boat Basin & Foundry Plaza in York, PA (Photo & Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

At #14 in the count down of the Top 50 York County Factories at End of 19th Century is Baugher, Kurtz & Stewart in York, PA. The 10th Factory Inspection Report, from the Pennsylvania Department of Factory Inspection, notes that on May 15th 1899, Baugher, Kurtz & Stewart has 140 employees; all male. Of these 140 employees, 17 employees are under 21-years-old, of which 3 are between 13 and 16-years-old. The goods manufactured are recorded as “Iron & Brass Castings.”

The site of this iron and brass foundry in York was along the west side of Codorus Creek, straddling West Philadelphia Street. I’ve pointed out the location of some of their key foundry buildings on the present photograph of the Codorus Boat Basin & Foundry Plaza.

The foundry site was on the north side of West Philadelphia Street; it is now the location of Susquehanna Commerce Center’s two 6-story office buildings. The pattern storage buildings still stand along the south side of West Philadelphia Street; the Waterway Bar & Grill is the present primary occupant. A flask storage building was located in the area of the present Boat Basin. Flasks hold together sand molds after receiving the impression of the wooden pattern.

The following photo of a neat plaque, on the wall of the Boat Basin, explains several steps in the casting process.

The silhouettes here show several foundry operations:

  • 1) Making the wooden pattern
  • 2) Mixing sand for the mold
  • 3) “Ramming up the mold,” (Packing sand around the pattern to make a mold)
  • 4) Filling a hand ladle with molten iron
  • 5) Pouring the hot metal into the sand mold

BoatBasinPlaque

The plaque also contains a short history of this site:

On this site once stood a portion of the Eyster, Weiser Company foundry, where wooden patterns were transformed into gray iron parts of printing presses, woodworking machinery and other manufacturing equipment.

A chain of creek-related industries preceded Eyster, Weiser. The Codorus Tannery, established in 1832, was followed by Codorus Foundry & Machine Works (known as Baugher, Kurtz & Stewart), then Baugher & Kurtz Co., Ltd. and finally, in 1909, Eyster, Weiser Company, which operated until 1971.

To the left [on the north wall of the Boat Basin] are castings of handmade patterns used by Eyster, Weiser. They duplicate the company’s unique pattern colors. They, and this wall, represent the blend of art and industry, technology and human skill, which are a pride of York City and the entire York area.

Continue reading as I expand upon the history of this progression of companies by use of maps, ads and photos.

Continue reading “#14 Baugher, Kurtz & Stewart; The Prominent Foundry along the Codorus in York” »

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1860 Buildings 51-58 in East Region of Springettsbury Township

Stony Brook Region in what is now Springettsbury Township; from Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County, PA & Penn Pilot Aerial Photo, from Sept. 15, 1937, of Same Area (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

Stony Brook Region in what is now Springettsbury Township; from Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County, PA & Penn Pilot Aerial Photo, from Sept. 15, 1937, of Same Area (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

At the top of this illustration, I’ve pointed out, and marked, eight 1860 buildings in the Stony Brook region within what is now Springettsbury Township. At the bottom of this illustration is a 1937 aerial photo of the same region, showing the (e51) location of the ‘S.H.’; a School House.

The corresponding locations of the other seven buildings, (e52) through (e58), shown on the 1860 map, are noted on the following enlarged view of the 1937 aerial photo. Until 1912, the east side of Locust Grove Road, completely up to East Market Street, was all Hauser farmland. Two of the initial buildings built on the east side of Locust Grove Road were the Stony Brook Mennonite Church and the second, (1913-1952), Stony Brook One-Room Schoolhouse; I’ll have more about these buildings later in this post.

DetailE51to58

I’m working my way around Springettsbury Township, ten buildings at a time, until all buildings from 1860 are visited. This post contains only eight buildings, to finish out the 58 buildings in the East Region of the township. See the post: Springettsbury Township building tally during 1860, for my specification of the four regions.

Other posts in this series include:

Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County contains the owner/occupant of most buildings; for example (e54) is J. Mellinger. Additional information on J. Mellinger can be found by consulting the 1860 Census of the United States; where one discovers this is Jacob Mellinger, a 40-year-old Farmer.

The results after consulting 1860 Spring Garden Township census records are shown below. Spring Garden Township records must be used because Springettsbury Township was formed from the northeast part of that township on April 20, 1891. The order of visitation, of the census taker, often provides assistance on who are neighbors and the tabulation of “value of real estate” separates the landowners from the renters or tenants:

StCensusE51to58

It is likely that none of these 1860 buildings still stand; however parts of the (e55 or e56) buildings, may still stand within the indicated more recent buildings along west side of Locust Grove Road. If anyone believes this may be the case, post a comment to contact me.

A Mennonite Congregation, established in 1803 and originally situated along Stone Ridge Road, was the first to build in the Hauser Farm fields along the east side of Locust Grove Road in Stony Brook. Construction began in 1912 for the church on the southeast corner of East Market Street and Locust Grove Road. The first services in that church building were conducted in 1913.

The building at the (e51) location, noted as ‘S.H.’ on the 1860 map, is the first Stony Brook One-Room Schoolhouse. A small lot, on which this schoolhouse was built, came from David Witmer on March 12, 1859 (Deed Book 5E, page 96). The school was built that summer and the first classes were held in the fall of 1859.

The 1860 map is close, but not precisely correct in locating the schoolhouse. The 1859 Deed and future maps have the school positioned tightly within the “Y” formed between Old Orchard Road and Locust Grove Road. Per the deed, from the intersection of these two roads, the school property extends 182 feet along the road heading more easterly (Old Orchard Road) and 153 feet along the road heading more southerly (Locust Grove Road.)

The story of the (e51) building, after it was no longer used as a schoolhouse, is told in Springettsbury Township Centennial, 1891-1991, page 51:

Later John A. Witmer built the frame house at the corner of Old Orchard and Locust Grove Roads. A schoolhouse, named Stony Brook, was on this land. It was torn down and the current residence was built about 1920 from much good timber saved from a business in the area.

A flower garden, created by the current owner, is located in the triangle of this area. It contains flowers from descendants of this (Witmer) founding family and others: Landis, Sprenkle, etc. It is called “My Friendship Garden” by the current owner, Rose Hulshart.

A future, more in-depth, post will include a photo of students, all identified, standing in front of the first Stony Brook One-Room Schoolhouse (1859-1913). The following posts were previously written about the second Stony Brook One-Room Schoolhouse (1913-1952); located at 101 Locust Grove Road:

My goal is to get community involvement. If anyone has a story associated with past owners of these properties, please post a comment.

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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York is In Danger of Losing the Susquehanna Trail during 1923

Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement: Part 15

Trail1923mapIn 1923, it had been five years since York was selected over Gettysburg as the southern extension city on the Susquehanna Trail. The concrete Trail from York to the Maryland line is complete by the end of 1923. However the laying of concrete over most of the Trail between York and Harrisburg was barely underway by the end of 1923. York had been successful in diverting funds to improve the roadway between York and York Haven, before doing hardly any work on the Trail route between York and Newberrytown.

If you examined the map closely in last Friday’s post, The Susquehanna Trail as a Ribbon of Concrete, you can see the mapped highway, heading northward from York, is actually the road curving towards the river; i.e. York Haven. After five years, York had made virtually no improvement to large sections of the designated Susquehanna Trail north of York. This was the reason many people traveling the unimproved Trail between York and Newberrytown were still getting stuck in the mud during 1923.

It did not sit well with some Williamsport people, where the idea of the Susquehanna Trail originated, that York was the only county lagging behind in supporting the Trail as the top priority. The Williamsport Chamber of Commerce started to print maps, as shown in this post, to rekindle their support for a Gettysburg route of the Susquehanna Trail.

The Williamsport Chamber of Commerce sent speakers to new Trail route towns, such as Gettysburg, Thurmont, Frederick and Rockville. They referred to the old routing of the Trail as being from Harrisburg through York; while firing-up communities on the new route of the Trail to press forward and demand a Susquehanna Trail route change. The Publicity Bureau of Gettysburg did just that, as reported by The Gettysburg Times issue of December 11, 1923: “The condition of the Harrisburg-York road will be called to the attention of Highway Commissioner Wright by the Gettysburg Publicity Bureau as further argument for the designation officially of the Harrisburg-Gettysburg-Washington route as the Susquehanna Trail.”

Trail1923articleThe renewed Susquehanna Trail organization, within Gettysburg, formed as a result of the following kick-off talk on September 24, 1923:

SUSQUEHANNA TRAIL MAY PASS THRO’ GETTYSBURG

Williamsport Hotel Men to Discuss Subject Before Local Rotary Club This Evening

John F. Letton, managing director of the Lycoming hotel at Williamsport, and vice president of the Associated Highways Organization of Pennsylvania, will address the Gettysburg Rotary Club at its weekly luncheon at the Hoffman House this evening at 6 o’clock on the subject: “The possibilities of the Susquehanna Trail.” This main highway has just been opened completely from Harrisburg into Northern New York state and continuation of it from Harrisburg south is being discussed and mapped out.

The old routing of this trail is from Harrisburg through York, thereby excluding Gettysburg and Adams County. The possibility of having it extended through this section will be discussed at the luncheon this evening.

These actions during 1923, initiated by the Williamsport Chamber of Commerce, did kick-start the work on improving the Susquehanna Trail between York and Harrisburg. As a result, York County did not lose the Susquehanna Trail.

However the by-product of these actions led to the creation of an officially designated Alternate Susquehanna Trail route from Harrisburg, through Gettysburg and Frederick, to Washington, D.C. The Williamsport Chamber of Commerce heavily promoted this Alternate Susquehanna Trail route, long after the Trail officially opened in 1924.

Next Friday, this series will continue on the Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement.

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 20 . . Europe . . Part 2

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 20 . . . Europe add 2 blanks after GOLD

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 20 . . . Europe

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century. This is Part 2 of Chapter 20 . . . Europe. A new part will be posted every Thursday. Recent chapters stand alone, starting here; however new readers may want to start at the beginning.

Continue reading “RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 20 . . Europe . . Part 2” »

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Mysteries of Springettsbury Township’s Erb Burial Plot

Top Photo is a detail from an Undated Aerial Photo by Dave Allen [from the Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Committee Archives] & Lower Photo is a 2014 Bing.com Birds Eye View (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

Top Photo is a detail from an Undated Aerial Photo by Dave Allen [from the Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Committee Archives] & Lower Photo is a 2014 Bing.com Birds Eye View (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

At least 50 years separate these two northward looking aerial photos east of I-83 at Mt. Rose Avenue. The top view is a detail from an undated aerial photo by Dave Allen and is from the Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Committee Archives. Read on to see why this photo can be dated between 1959 and 1964, most likely circa 1961. The lower photo is a 2014 Bing.com Birds Eye View.

In recent months I’ve received several inquiries about the Erb Burial Plot. This family cemetery still shows up on present maps, in Springettsbury Township, near the Mt. Rose Avenue interchange with I-83. For example, in an ADC Map Book, turn to page 3566, at grid location A7: a Cemetery is indicated near the northwest corner of Russell Street and Washington Road.

People visit that location, wanting to do family history research from the inscriptions on gravestones within the cemetery. Not seeing a cemetery, they inquire at the Misericordia Nursing and Rehab Center, near the site; where no one has any idea about a cemetery in the area.

First mystery solved; the remains from the 44 graves in the Erb Burial Plot were transferred 50 years ago to two common graves in Mt. Rose Cemetery. This was done when the Misericordia Center was built; not wanting to have a small cemetery at their entrance off of Russell Street. In 1964 it was permissible to do this to old family cemeteries. However after Pennsylvania passed the Historic Burial Places Preservation Act in 1994, moving such cemeteries is illegal.

Second mystery remains unsolved. What happened to the original gravestones? They were not transferred to Mt. Rose Cemetery. If you know what happened to the original gravestones, please comment.

A related mystery involves a business within the area. Shearer’s 1860 Map of York County notes “Landis & Erb” in the same township. Speculation is that this is a business, which refers to John Landes and Jacob Erb; both these men and their families were buried within the Erb Burial Plot. If anyone knows specific details about this business, please comment.

The removal of the remains from the Erb Burial Plot, during 1964, is referenced within the Cemetery Books at the York County Heritage Trust; Volume II, page 224. This volume also lists the details, recorded from the 44 gravestones on November 20, 1933.

The neighboring section of Interstate-83 was opened October 28, 1959. Therefore the upper undated aerial photo was taken between 1959 and 1964. Viewing other buildings in the whole undated photo, I’m fairly certain the upper photo is very close to 1961.

The following photo shows the marker placed over the common Erb Burial Plot graves within Section L of Mt. Rose Cemetery. Specific location is in the North Half of Lot 215. A follow-up post will examine this marker in greater detail.

Erb Burial Plot graves within Section L of Mt. Rose Cemetery (2014 Photo, S. H. Smith)

Erb Burial Plot graves within Section L of Mt. Rose Cemetery (2014 Photo, S. H. Smith)

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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What Happened to the Old Church Records of Freysville?

Bing.com westward looking Birds Eye View of Freysville, Windsor Township, York Co., PA (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

Bing.com westward looking Birds Eye View of Freysville, Windsor Township, York Co., PA (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2014)

The November 2nd, 2014 meeting of the South Central Pennsylvania Genealogical Society was held at Emanuel Lutheran Church in Freysville. Richard Konkel presented the program on the early history of Frey’s Church. Richard raised the question, “What happened to the Old Church Records of Freysville?” There are only two churches in all of York County where the early church records are missing; Frey’s Church is one of them.

As early as 1742, Conrad Fry (Frey) owned 163-acres in the area. He established Burying Grounds on this land as early as 1748. In 1771, Conrad deeded 1.5-acres to Lutheran and German Reformed Congregations in the area to build a Union Church. Records indicate that first church building was about 200-yards from the Freysville crossroads; however the exact location of this earliest church is unknown. A foundation has never been discovered. Also, there may have been a second church building; that no longer exists.

The cornerstone for what was the second, or possibly third, Union Church was laid in 1851; this is now Emmanuel United Church of Christ at 1625 Windsor Road. The union arrangement was dissolved in 1909, at which time the Reformed Congregation purchased the 1851 church property. On the opposite corner of the crossroads, the Lutheran Congregation laid the cornerstone for their church in 1909; this is now Emanuel Lutheran Church at 2650 Freysville Road. The third congregation in Freysville is Methodist; their church is Zion United Methodist Church at 2595 Freysville Road.

All the early congregations were German. As such, I imagine the missing early church records could look something like the following mock up example. I created this sample baptism register page, just in case someone has these early church records and don’t realize what they have, since the writing is in German.

Mock up of what the earliest Baptism Page may look like in the Oldest Church Records of Freysville (S. H. Smith, 2014)

Mock up of what the earliest Baptism Page may look like in the Oldest Church Records of Freysville (S. H. Smith, 2014)

Anno 1777, at the top, records the year. The first column records the PARENTS: Michael and Anna Maria. The second column records the CHILD: Johannes, born 14 November [1776], baptized 21 May [1777]. The third column records the SPONSORS: Joh. Conrad and wife.

Richard Konkel noted, in his presentation, that in the early 1920s, the missing records were examined for a 1925 history of the church. Within an account, about compiling the church history, it was noted that the early records were examined and that the earliest baptism was recorded in 1777, however no further details were offered. Since 1925, these records have not been seen.

Many people in York County descend from early members of Frey’s Church. I am one of them. I know of many family historians for whom these early church records could provide key finds at discovering significant details about their ancestors early history in York County. If anyone knows where these records are located, please consider making them available to the York County Heritage Trust, so that they can be copied and used by family historians for generations to come.

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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The Susquehanna Trail as a Ribbon of Concrete

Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement: Part 14

CarOnConcreteDuring Halloween of 1920, a masked carnival was held to celebrate the Susquehanna Trail’s completion, as a concrete highway, through Shrewsbury. The goal of the Board of Governors of the Susquehanna Trail Association was to construct the whole road surface from the New York border to the Maryland line as a concrete highway. However, the whole Susquehanna Trail was not even close to being completed as a “ribbon of concrete” in 1920. It would be 1924 before the official opening of the Trail.

CarInMudIn fact, parts of the Susquehanna Trail in York County remained as unimproved roadway until early 1924. One section of the unimproved Trail in Northern York County resulted in over 100 motorists getting stuck in the mud after a 1923 rainstorm. By 1923, it had been over six years since the initial idea for a north-south Susquehanna Trail improved highway in Pennsylvania had been conceived.

ConcreteHwy1923This illustration appears on page 262 of the November 1923 issue of Concrete Highway Magazine. By the end of the 1923 construction season, the solid black lines represent the sections of the Susquehanna Trail that had been improved as a concrete highway. Quoting from that article:

It is difficult to find a more pleasant region in which to motor than eastern Pennsylvania. The rolling hills, the rugged mountains and the beautiful waterways delight the eye. And because the land has been settled since early Colonial days, there are quaint houses, old fashioned hedges enclosing tilled fields and interesting cities. It is a friendly, homelike region, quiet and peaceful, for the spirit of William Penn pervades the land.

Extending across the Commonwealth in an almost due north and south direction is the Susquehanna Trail. For the greater part of its journey it parallels the picturesque shores of the Susquehanna, leaving the river at Williamsport to plunge into the rugged mountains to the north. This modern highway is now almost entirely paved with concrete.

Starting at Baltimore, the motorist drives north to the Pennsylvania line where a concrete road leads him through a rich farming country to York. Years before the Revolution, the public square in the heart of this historic city was deeded by William Penn for a common pasture ground.

Could the old Quaker fathers of those early days see the teeming, bustling square today, they would be astonished. Instead of the old common pasture, they would see a traffic way, so busy that it was necessary to install an automatically timed bell at the first ringing of which all motor traffic stops to give pedestrians an opportunity to cross the square. Another bell and pedestrians are halted in the safety zones while vehicular traffic has the right of way.

Proceeding north the highway dips into hallows and ascends hills from which there are inspiring views of broad valleys and distant mountain ranges. Soon the Susquehanna River is crossed and the motorist finds himself suddenly in the heart of Harrisburg near the beautiful capitol building.

We learn from this article, that by 1923, York is using an automatically timed bell to regulate traffic in the square. York’s square being at the crossroads of two of the greatest highways in the good roads movement; the Lincoln Highway and the Susquehanna Trail.

Next Friday, this series will continue on the Story of the Susquehanna Trail in the Good Roads Movement.

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

Posted in all posts, Automobiles, Maps, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Roads, Susquehanna River, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 20 . . Europe . . Part 1

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 20 . . . Containers add 2 blanks after GOLD

RAILCAR GOLD   Chapter 20 . . . Europe

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century. This is Part 1 of Chapter 20 . . . Europe. A new part will be posted every Thursday. Recent chapters stand alone, starting here; however new readers may want to start at the beginning.

Continue reading “RAILCAR GOLD Chapter 20 . . Europe . . Part 1” »

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