Dream Valley Boys of Hanover; WORK & WBAL Radio Artists

Promotional Photo of Dream Valley Boy’s of Hanover PA (S. H. Smith Collections)

Promotional Photo of Dream Valley Boy’s of Hanover PA (S. H. Smith Collections)

While attending the Lancaster Family History Conference last month, one of the vendors had this promotional photo of the Dream Valley Boy’s of Hanover PA. I purchased the photo; wondering if I could discover the names of the men in the group for a YorksPast post.

DreamValley2The photo includes the names of the players as: “Little Mary”, “Mac”, “Bob”, and “Bill”. The back of the photo notes they are all former WORK & WBAL Radio Artists. The back of the photo also has a “Hoffman Studio, Hanover, PA” imprint. This was the studio of Adam A. Hoffman and was in existence from 1920 to 1950.

This Thomasville Inn ad, from The Evening Sun of Hanover, is one of several that have “The Dream Valley Boys” performing Saturday Nights during November and December of 1954. Those are the latest ads that I’ve discovered for this group; that featured: banjos, guitar, washboard, jug, and other instruments. Do any of my readers have memories of seeing this group perform?

DreamValley3This Valley View Grove ad is from The Gazette and Daily during 1938. Dream Valley Boys from Hanover, were giving free shows Sunday afternoon and evening on August 14th. Valley View Grove is more widely known by the later name Valley View Park; located on the hillside between Hellam and Yorkana.

The earliest mention that has been discovered about the Dream Valley Boys appears in the August 12, 1937 edition of The Evening Sun of Hanover; where the Ladies’ Aid Society of St. Luke’s Church held their annual picnic, with entertainment furnished by the Dream Valley Boys. The group’s performances spanned at least 1937 through 1954.

The following is a scan of the writing on the back of the promotional photo. I was not successful in putting names to the faces; can any of my readers help?

Back of Promotional Photo of Dream Valley Boy’s of Hanover PA (S. H. Smith Collections)

Back of Promotional Photo of Dream Valley Boy’s of Hanover PA (S. H. Smith Collections)

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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On the Job at Black Bridge

Pennsylvania Railroad Construction Gang at Bridge No. 59-43 (Black Bridge) on July 5, 1934 (Collection of S. H. Smith)

Pennsylvania Railroad Construction Gang at Bridge No. 59-43 (Black Bridge) on July 5, 1934 (Collection of S. H. Smith)

This photo shows a Pennsylvania Railroad construction gang at Bridge No. 59-43 on July 5, 1934. This bridge has long been called Black Bridge; it carries trains over the Codorus Creek as railroad traffic moves between York and Emigsville.

A bridge at this location was originally built in 1848. It was designated Bridge No. 98, when under control of the Northern Central Railway. Once the Pennsylvania Railroad assumed control of bridge maintenance the bridge number was changed to No. 59-43.

My grandfather, Luther S. Smith, and father, Harold L. Smith, worked on Black Bridge when employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad. My grandfather insisted that a photo be taken upon Harold’s first day on the job with the Pennsylvania Railroad; that is the photo shown above. The construction gang front row includes: Paul Smith, City Heckart, Harold Smith and Thed Jacobs. Dad’s writing, on the back of the photo, questioned the two rightmost in the back row, however those identified include: Paul Resh, Frank Zarfoss, Nonemaker, Newcomer, ?, ?.

In 1934, the construction crew was building forms around some of the foundation stonework for their encasement in re-bar and concrete. My grandfather initially worked on Black Bridge very early in his 40-year career with the Pennsylvania Railroad; therefore likely slightly before the time of the following circa 1907 Postcard of Black Bridge.

Black Bridge, Penn. R. R., York, Pa. (Postcard from S. H. Smith Collections)

Black Bridge, Penn. R. R., York, Pa. (Postcard from S. H. Smith Collections)

In this postcard view of Black Bridge, the photographer is standing in Manchester Township and looking across the Codorus Creek into Springettsbury Township. The path under the closest bridge span is the initial Black Bridge Road, which hugged the Manchester Township bank of the Codorus Creek. I remember Dad including this road under Black Bridge in some of the early Sunday drives for our family. That initial Black Bridge Road was abandoned after the new Black Bridge Road was build up on the hill about in the 1980s.

Black Bridge is again readily accessible with the newly opened 2.5-mile Springettsbury Township section of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park. This section extends from the intersection of Route 30 and Loucks Mill Road north along the east side of the Codorus Creek to Mundis Mill Road; then bridging the Codorus into Manchester Township.

In the following photo, the view looks downstream at Black Bridge, with the rail trail passing under the bridge and the Codorus Creek passing under the bridge at the middle left side of the photo.  The rail trail is in Springettsbury Township and Manchester Township is shown on the middle left side of the photo. Over a week ago when I walked the rail trail in this area, I could see remnants of the original Black Bridge Road on the opposite side of the creek; now, a week later the rapid growth of vegetation has all but covered the remnants. I’ll have to wait until this winter for a better view.

Eastward View of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park, as it passes under Black Bridge (S. H. Smith, 2015)

Eastward View of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park, as it passes under Black Bridge (S. H. Smith, 2015)

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Eagle Nest within 700-feet of Route 30

Springettsbury Township section of County Rail Trail

Zoomed in photo of Eagle Nest while standing on Springettsbury Township section of Heritage Rail Trail (S. H. Smith, 2015)

Zoomed in photo of Eagle Nest while standing on Springettsbury Township section of Heritage Rail Trail (S. H. Smith, 2015)

The newly opened 2.5-mile section of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park has become my favorite place to take a walk. This Springettsbury Township section extends from the intersection of Route 30 and Loucks Mill Road north along the east side of the Codorus Creek to Mundis Mill Road; then bridging the Codorus into Manchester Township.

I’ve been on this section of the trail five times in the past week. The first time I walked this section, I saw an eagle catching food down by the creek, then flying into a tree; actually to the nest pictured.

Every walk I stop to admire these eagles for a few minutes. Another walker made the comment, “that nest is within 700-feet of Route 30. The Pennsylvania Game Commission fined a person for getting within 1000-feet of the eagle nest in Codorus State Park; the Game Commission could make a boat load of money fining everybody driving on Route 30.” These urban eagles seem to tolerate all the noise coming from nearby Route 30.

The parking lot at the south end of the new trail section is located on the southwest corner of Route 30 and Loucks Mill Road. The entrance to the parking lot is located off of Loucks Mill Road.

Loucks Mill Road Parking Lot of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park (S. H. Smith, 2015)

Loucks Mill Road Parking Lot of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park (S. H. Smith, 2015)

The parking lot at the north end of this new trail section is located in Greg A. Crist Memorial Park, along Emig Road, in Manchester Township. The following photo is a southward view from under a willow tree that overhands the trail, just upstream of Black Bridge.

Southward View of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park, just upstream of Black Bridge (S. H. Smith, 2015)

Southward View of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park, just upstream of Black Bridge (S. H. Smith, 2015)

The bridge carrying the railroad tracks over this section of the Codorus Creek is known as Black Bridge.  This bridge will be the subject of a new series of YorksPast posts.

This view looks downstream at Black Bridge, with the rail trail passing under the bridge and the Codorus Creek passing under the bridge at the middle left side of the photo.  The rail trail is in Springettsbury Township and Manchester Township is shown on the middle left side of the photo.

Eastward View of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park, as it passes under Black Bridge (S. H. Smith, 2015)

Eastward View of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park, as it passes under Black Bridge (S. H. Smith, 2015)

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Top 50 York County Sesqui-Centennial Factories

Top50Factories1899

In 1899, York County celebrated its Sesqui-Centennial; the 150th anniversary of its creation on August 19, 1749, as the first Pennsylvania county completely west of the Susquehanna River. This summary post contains every link to the recently completed series on the Top 50 York County Factories during 1899.

I used employee data from the 10th Report of the Pennsylvania Department of Factory Inspection to rank the 479 York County factories by numbers of employees; #50 has 47 employees, on up to #1 with 510 employees. Employee counts in these reports are from state inspector visits that examined employee records and are claimed to be more accurate than Chamber of Commerce or Manufacture Association publications, which tend to significantly round-up employees counts.

This post provides condensed highlights for the top 10 factories. These highlights are followed by links to all of the 50 top factories during York County’s Sesqui-Centennial.

Yt146#1 A. B. Farquhar, Largest York County Factory Employer in 1899

In 1899, the A. B. Farquhar Company in York was the largest factory employer in all of York County; a position they held continuously for the past fifteen years. Arthur B. Farquhar started working for the predecessor W. W. Dingee & Company in 1856 and become the sole proprietor of this firm in 1862. This post takes the reader through company highlights until the 1951 sale of A. B. Farquhar Company to the Oliver Corporation; becoming the ninth plant in their organization. Eventually Oliver started to consolidate York plant operations to their other plants. By the time White Motor Corporation acquired Oliver Corporation in 1960, all production had been moved out of the York plant; as a result, the York plant was not included in the acquisition by White. For a decade, these buildings suffered demolition by neglect. When the buildings had reached the state of becoming a nuisance, they were taken down about 1970.

Yt148#2 York Manufacturing Company; Ice Making to Air Conditioning

Of the six original founders of the York Manufacturing Company, Jacob Loucks was the sole remaining founder with the company after 1880. Loucks was the individual responsible for getting the company into the ice making business; selling their first machine in 1885. This turned out to be an expensive move that nearly bankrupt both the company and Jacob Loucks; however it was a necessary move, otherwise YORK Air Conditioning may have never happened. From only 50 employees prior to the hiring of Thomas Shipley as General Manager in 1897, the company went through a ten-fold expansion of their workforce in only two years. By 1899, the York Manufacturing Company had skyrocketed to become the second largest factory employer in all of York County.

Yt142#3 Martin Carriage Works; largest West York Factory in 1899

By 1899, the Martin Carriage Works in West York had grown to become the third largest factory employer in all of York County. Milton D. Martin established this company in 1888. This post takes the reader through company highlights until the successor Martin-Parry Corporation moved out of York County in 1946. Most Yorkers know Milton D. Martin today via his bequest establishing the free public Martin Library on the corner of Market and Queen Streets in York.

Yt147#4 P. H. Glatfelter Paper Mill in Spring Grove; Over 150 Years of Paper Making

On December 23, 1863, Philip H. Glatfelter purchased the small Spring Forge Paper Mill at an orphan’s court sale; marking the start of the P. H. Glatfelter Company. By 1899, the P. H. Glatfelter Paper Mill in Spring Grove had grown to become the fourth largest factory employer in all of York County and they continue to be a very successful York County business.

Yt149#5 American Caramel Company in York, with links to Hershey’s Chocolate & Graybill’s

The earliest origins of this confectionery company go back to 1867, when Peter C. Wiest started making caramels in York. The American Caramel Company was created March 28, 1898; when the Breisch-Hine Company in Philadelphia merged with The P. C. Wiest & Company in York. The home office of the American Caramel Company was located in York, PA. By 1899, the York Plant of the American Caramel Company had grown to become the fifth largest factory employer in all of York County. On August 10, 1900, the American Caramel Company acquired the Lancaster Caramel Company from Milton Hershey. Hershey sold his caramel company, deciding more money could be made in the chocolate business; history proves Hershey made the right decision.

Yt137#6 York Haven Paper Company; on the Site of One of the Earliest Canals in America

The population of the town of York Haven took off after the 1885 establishment of the York Haven Paper Company. York Haven was incorporated as a borough seven years later; on December 1, 1892. The York Haven Paper Company might have never been built at this site, without prior ventures that harnessed the hydropower of the Conewago Falls immediately upriver.

Yt133#7 York Rolling Mill in Spring Garden Township; site of a Massive Explosion in 1908

The York Rolling Mill was established in Spring Garden Township three years after the end of the Civil War. By 1899, it had grown to become the seventh largest factory employer in all of York County. After a massive explosion on August 10, 1908, all useable equipment from the site was moved to a Susquehanna Iron & Steel Company mill in Columbia. The remains of the damaged York Rolling Mill building were demolished and the factory was never rebuilt.

Yt135#8 York Carriage Company; becomes site of Pullman Automobile production in York

The York Carriage Company was established during 1889, at 158-160 North George Street in York. That location is presently occupied by the Pullman Building; housing the Pullman Apartments at 238 North George Street. Don’t be misled by the different street numbers; between then and now, the street address numbers changed in York.

Yt130#9 Jacob A. Mayer & Brothers, in North York; Segars by the Million

By the time he was 25-years old, Jacob A. Mayer owned the largest cigar factory in Pennsylvania. By the time he was 33-years old, Jacob had consolidated his business operations in Mayersville; now North York. In 1899, Jacob A. Mayer & Brothers was the #9 factory employer in all of York County; continuing to operate the largest cigar factory in the county.

Yt150#10 S. Morgan Smith Company; Industry Leader in Hydraulic Turbines

Stephen M. Smith received this first Turbine Water Wheel patent on December 26, 1876, while still President of the York Manufacturing Company. Smith retained rights to his new patent, named it the “Success” turbine and contracted with York Manufacturing Company to produce it. Shortly after Smith received his second Turbine Water Wheel patent on December 30, 1879, he resigned from the York Manufacturing Company to start his own company, initially advertised as S. M. Smith, while still utilizing several York machine shops, including the York Manufacturing Company, to manufacture his turbine water wheels throughout the 1880s. Starting in 1881, the use of S. Morgan Smith first appears in directories and ads. In 1890, S. Morgan Smith built a factory to do his own manufacturing; his company became the industry leader in hydraulic turbines.

The following are links to all of the 50 top factories in York County at the end of 19th Century. As a group, these 50 factories provided employment for 6,215 people in York County during 1899.

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Timeline for Lincoln Funeral Train

York County section of O. W. Gray’s 1876 Railroad & County Map of Pennsylvania (Lincoln Funeral Train route highlighted by S. H. Smith, 2015)

York County section of O. W. Gray’s 1876 Railroad & County Map of Pennsylvania (Map from Library of Congress; Lincoln Funeral Train route highlighted by S. H. Smith, 2015)

The Northern Central Railway’s Special Schedule, for the Friday April 21, 1865, Lincoln Funeral Train from Baltimore to Harrisburg, lists schedule times for the Pilot Engine; with a footnote indicating the Funeral Train will follow 10-minutes after the Pilot Engine. After I gave a talk in Glen Rock, I got the comment “it would be nice to have a timeline of when the funeral train actually passed by all the Northern Central stations in York County.”

I’ve highlighted the Lincoln Funeral Train route through York County on O. W. Gray’s 1876 Railroad & County Map of Pennsylvania. This map shows the Northern Central stations along the Lincoln Funeral Train route and their relative locations.

On the Special Schedule, a five-minute stop is noted at Summit No. 1, which is New Freedom; this allowed the funeral train to take on the delegation headed by Pennsylvania Governor Andrew Curtin. New Freedom and York were the only funeral train stops in York County. From Baltimore it was an upgrade to New Freedom; then a downgrade to York. This was followed by an upgrade to Mt. Wolf (Summit No. 2 on the Special Schedule) and then a downgrade to Harrisburg.

York was a scheduled 5-minute stop for the steam locomotive to take on water. However an unscheduled memorial service extended that stop to about 10-minute. The Lincoln Funeral Train pulled into the Pennsylvania Railroad Station in Harrisburg at 8:35 p.m.; 15-minutes past the scheduled time.

Based upon the above information and mileages from Railroad Time Tables, I calculated an estimated timeline for the Lincoln Funeral Train as it passed by all the Northern Central stations in York County. I also included stations and features from later schedules.

The Lincoln Funeral Train averaged 15.5 MPH between Baltimore and New Freedom, 18.5 MPH between New Freedom and York, and 15.5 MPH between York and Harrisburg. The Lincoln Funeral Train passed the following on Friday, April 21, 1865 at these estimated times:

  • 3:10 p.m. Baltimore, MD (Leave)
  • 5:20 p.m. Freeland, MD
  • 5:30 p.m. New Freedom, PA (Arrive)
  • 5:35 p.m. New Freedom (Leave)
  • 5:42 p.m. Railroad is station for Shrewsbury
  • 5:49 p.m. Seitzland
  • 5:52 p.m. Glen Rock
  • 6:03 p.m. Hanover Junction
  • 6:06 p.m. Smyser’s (Seven Valleys)
  • 6:11 p.m. Glatfelter’s
  • 6:17 p.m. Howard Tunnel
  • 6:22 p.m. Brillhart’s
  • 6:33 p.m. Grantley
  • 6:40 p.m. York (Arrive)
  • 6:50 p.m. York (Leave)
  • 7:07 p.m. Emigsville
  • 7:20 p.m. Mt. Wolf
  • 7:27 p.m. Conewago
  • 7:34 p.m. York Haven
  • 7:39 p.m. Cly
  • 7:48 p.m. Goldsboro
  • 7:59 p.m. Middletown Ferry
  • 8:10 p.m. Marsh Run
  • 8:20 p.m. New Cumberland
  • 8:27 p.m. Bridgeport (Lemoyne)
  • 8:35 p.m. Harrisburg, PA (Arrive)

The following timeline spreadsheet was used to calculate the estimated times. The spreadsheet also includes today’s Daylight Saving Time (DST) corresponding to the equivalent time of the day on April 21, 1865.

YorkCoLincolnT

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Lincoln’s Engineer: Baltimore Bottleneck

CobbCGardner Cobb was the Engineer who ran the Northern Central locomotive on the train taking the Abraham Lincoln party from Harrisburg, PA, to Baltimore in the next to last leg of the grand Lincoln First Inaugural rail route from Springfield, Illinois to Washington, D.C. The morning of February 22, 1861, Engineer Cobb pulled out of Harrisburg with the Lincoln party and when the train was held on waiting orders in York, PA, Cobb went into the cars to greet the President-elect.

To Engineer Cobb’s surprise, he learned one was missing from the Lincoln party. Abraham Lincoln had been secretly taken overnight in a roundabout route through Philadelphia to Washington. This still required Abraham Lincoln to journey through the streets of Baltimore between non-connecting rail stations, however it was done in secret, without incident, at 3:00 a.m.

When the train carrying the Lincoln party reached Baltimore, Engineer Cobb recalled the station was in the hands of a mob antagonistic to Lincoln and that some of the angry men spat on Lincoln’s children before the family could leave the city for Washington at Camden Station. Cobb says that had Lincoln been on the train going into Baltimore the mob would surely have killed him.

BottleneckI’ve annotated this Bing.com Bird’s Eye View of Baltimore with what was known as the Baltimore Bottleneck during the Civil War. On February 22, 1861, Engineer Cobb ran the Northern Central train to Calvert Station, where the Lincoln party disembarked. Whereupon they entered horse and carriages to travel to Camden Station, and then proceed, on a B & O Railroad train, to Washington, D.C.

City ordinances forbid railroads to operate in downtown Baltimore. The resulting non-connecting railroads created a travel bottleneck through Baltimore. Most people know that the first shots of the Civil War occurred April 12, 1861, when Confederates fired on Fort Sumter in South Carolina. However the first casualties of the Civil War occurred in the streets of Baltimore a week later, on April 19, as a direct result of the Baltimore Bottleneck.

President Lincoln’s call for volunteers quickly brought the initial northern militia units south to protect Washington, D.C. The key northern rail link into Washington, D.C. was the B & O Railroad; which meant traveling through Baltimore. On April 19, northern militia units, marching on city streets between the non-connecting railroad stations, where confronted by a mob of civilians who began stoning the soldiers. The confrontation escalated until eight in the mob, two soldiers and one bystander were killed.

Railcars could be transferred between the Northern Central and the B & O Railroad, however it was a slow arduous process. Individual railcars could be hauled, via teams of horses, between the different rail stations upon the Baltimore Street Railway tracks.

LINCOLN FUNERAL TRAIN

On April 21, 1865, after traveling from Washington, D.C., the Lincoln Funeral Train arrived in Baltimore, on the B & O Railroad, at Camden Station by 10:00 a.m. A procession, carrying Lincoln’s coffin, moved over city streets to Exchange Place, where the body lay in state. The cover of the coffin was removed for the public to pay their respects to the remains.

While the body of Lincoln lay in state, the two dedicated funeral train railcars, that carried Lincoln’s coffin and the official party, were hauled by teams of horses north upon the Baltimore Street Railway tracks to Bolton Station on the Northern Central. This is where the same Engineer Cobb added these two dedicated cars to the seven cars and locomotive of the Northern Central Railway. The assembled Lincoln Funeral Train backed down to Calvert Station to accept the coffin of Lincoln following the procession from Exchange Place. The funeral train pulled out of Baltimore at 3:10 p.m., slowly traveling through northern Baltimore County and York County on its somber journey to Harrisburg, PA.

Engineer Gardner Cobb was at the controls of the Lincoln Funeral Train during the 84-mile leg of the journey from Baltimore to Harrisburg, PA. The train stopped just north of the Pennsylvania-Maryland State Line in New Freedom, PA, at 5:30 p.m. to take on the delegation headed by Pennsylvania Governor Andrew Curtin. Along the way, people lined the tracks to pay their respects prior to entering York at 6:40 p.m.

York was a scheduled stop for the steam locomotive to take on water. During the stop, town bells rung. A brief memorial service was followed by six ladies from York, placing a large rose wreath on Lincoln’s coffin; followed by Aquilla Howard, a black man, placing a wreath on behalf of the City of York. All the while a brass band from the United States Military Hospital in York played a mournful dirge.

At sunset, the funeral train departed York at 6:50 p.m. and pulled into the Pennsylvania Railroad Station in Harrisburg at 8:35 p.m.; 15-minutes past the scheduled time. Lincoln’s body lay in state overnight in the Hall of the House of Representatives in the State Capitol, thus ending the first day of the April 21st through May 3rd, funeral train odyssey taking the body of Abraham Lincoln back to Springfield, Illinois.

This is the second post in a series on Lincoln’s Engineer and the Lincoln Funeral Train. Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Lincoln’s Engineer: Gardner Cobb

Sketch of Gardner Cobb (Reading Eagle in Reading, PA; Issue of July 12, 1903)

Sketch of Gardner Cobb (Reading Eagle in Reading, PA; Issue of July 12, 1903)

An obituary of Gardner Cobb appeared in The New York Times on April 7, 1908. The obituary was concise, while emphasizing a connection to Abraham Lincoln.

Gardner Cobb, one of the oldest railroad engineers in the country, died in Shamokin, Penn., last night. He ran President Lincoln’s funeral train a part of the way from Washington to Illinois.

The same day, The York Daily in York, PA, contained additional details in their obituary of Gardiner Cobb.

During the Civil War he was in charge of a number of ammunition and supply trains, and ran the locomotive which drew the funeral train of the martyred President Lincoln from Baltimore to Harrisburg.

The sketch of Gardner Cobb is from his 1903 retirement from the Reading Railroad. At the time Engineer Cobb was 77-years old and was said to be the oldest passenger locomotive engineer in the country.

Gardner Cobb was born during June of 1826. In 1843, at 17-years-old, he was trained as an engineer on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. For sixty years he served as an engineer for several railroads. He never had an accident nor was he ever injured on the job.

From 1856 to 1869, Gardner Cobb was an engineer on the Northern Central Railway; which was technically part of the Pennsylvania Railroad System after 1860. Engineer Cobb not only had the duty of running President Lincoln’s funeral train through York County, he was the engineer on the train that was to have brought Abraham Lincoln through York County prior to Lincoln’s first inauguration.

During the Civil War, Gardner Cobb had charge of all extra trains out of Baltimore; this coupled with Engineer Cobb running Lincoln scheduled trains through York County in 1861 and 1865, increases the possibility that Cobb ran the locomotive between Baltimore and Hanover Junction during Abraham Lincoln’s journey through York County so President Lincoln could attend the dedication of the Soldier’s Cemetery in Gettysburg during November of 1863.

An article in The York Daily on July 8, 1903, contained an interview with Gardner Cobb upon his retirement; reflecting back on the time he was an Engineer for the Northern Central Railway. He talked about an event prior to Lincoln’s first inauguration and of his most exciting experience during the Civil War.

Engineer Cobb one morning received orders to bring a train of three cars and an engine from Harrisburg to Baltimore the next day. The train was to be occupied by the Lincoln party. He was at Harrisburg the same night and saw Lincoln, Alexander K. McClure and other notables walking about the main streets. Early the next day Cobb ran his engine up to the special train, a huge crowd surrounded it, shouting and cheering for Lincoln.

At York the train was held on waiting orders and Cobb went into the cars to greet the President, when, to Cobb’s surprise, he learned that Lincoln the night previous had been taken through Philadelphia to Washington and was sworn in as President of the United States. When Cobb’s train reached Baltimore, the station was in the hands of a mob antagonistic to Lincoln. Some of the angry men spat on Lincoln’s children before the family could leave the city for Washington. Cobb says that had Lincoln been on the train going into Baltimore the mob would surely have killed him.

When the war broke out Cobb and Conductor Samuel Blair, now superintendent of the Pennsylvania’s Bald Eagle Valley Division, had charge of all extra trains out of Baltimore and they carried many regiments of Union troops to the front.

Mr. Cobb says one of the most exciting experiences was taking an ammunition car toward Gettysburg during the second day’s fight. He was in Baltimore when a rush message from Hanover Junction stated a car full of ammunition had accidentally passed through to Baltimore, when it should have been side tracked at the junction and hurried to Gettysburg, as the Union troops needed it. Cobb coupled one of the speediest locomotives in the round house to the car, and at a rate of more than a mile a minute, ran the forty-five miles to Hanover Junction.

Gardner and Annie Cobb had four children that lived to adulthood. Their daughters: Annie, Minnie and Eva; were married as Mrs. Annie Strickland, Mrs. John Campton and Mrs. George Wallace, respectively. Their son was Gilbert Hanover Cobb, who had a 58-year career as a freight agent for the railroads and steamship lines. Gardner Arnold Cobb is buried in Saint Edwards Cemetery in Coal Township, Northumberland County, PA. This is his gravestone from Find A Grave.

CobbB

This is the first post in a series on Lincoln’s Engineer and the Lincoln Funeral Train. Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

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Lincoln Funeral Train

Classics from YorksPast; Prelude to posts on Lincoln’s Engineer

Harrisburg photographer D. C. Burnite photo of Lincoln’s Funeral Train next to the Harrisburg Railroad Depot (Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania; Zooming in on the Pennsylvania Railroad locomotive No. 331)

Harrisburg photographer D. C. Burnite photo of Lincoln’s Funeral Train next to the Harrisburg Railroad Depot (Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania; Zooming in on the Pennsylvania Railroad locomotive No. 331)

After posting Why is the Steam Into History locomotive named York #17 ?  three months ago, I’ve had a few queries from readers with questions like: Is this really the type of locomotive that pulled Lincoln’s train to Gettysburg?  Is this really the type of locomotive that pulled Lincoln’s Funeral Train?  This post is the result of researching those questions.

The above photo, taken by Harrisburg photographer D. C. Burnite, the morning of April 22, 1865, zooms in on Lincoln’s Funeral Train locomotive next to the Harrisburg Railroad Depot.  Harrisburg, Pennsylvania is where Lincoln’s body lay in state in the state capitol, the night of April 21st and into the morning of the 22nd.  The locomotive shown is Pennsylvania Railroad Engine No. 331; a 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive.

Other relevant posts include:

Continue reading “Lincoln Funeral Train” »

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Wrightsville, Westphalia, and the First River Bridge

Wrightsville, York County on 1824 Map of Lancaster County, PA, by Joshua Scott (Library of Congress)

Wrightsville, York County on 1824 Map of Lancaster County, PA, by Joshua Scott (Library of Congress)

York County was formed from Lancaster County in 1749; at that time it was reasonable to look at Lancaster County Maps for York County Information. However 75-years later the best map details available for Wrightsville, with adjoining town Westphalia, and the first bridge, crossing the Susquehanna River to Columbia, comes from an 1824 Map of Lancaster County, PA by Joshua Scott. This map section comes from an original on the Library of Congress web site.

For my post Lancaster County Maps have York County Information, I initially discovered a copy of this map on the campus of LancasterHistory.org. This is the map detail I used for that 2012 post.

Detail from 1824 Map of Lancaster Co., PA by Joshua Scott (LancasterHistory.org)

Detail from 1824 Map of Lancaster Co., PA by Joshua Scott (LancasterHistory.org)

The town of Westphalia was absorbed into Wrightsville when the Borough of Wrightsville was incorporated in 1834. This is the best detail, on a period map, that I have seen on the location of the first Susquehanna River Bridge between Wrightsville, York County and Columbia, Lancaster County. The horizontal line across the center of the map sections is one of the map grid lines.

At the time of the 2012 post, I got several comments agreeing, they had never seen the Wrightsville side of a map showing the first river bridge. I got a request yesterday, if I had an enlarged view of this map; a request which resulted in the discovery that the Library of Congress now has an original of this map on their web site.

This first bridge between Wrightsville and Columbia was completed December 5, 1814; however it only existed for slightly over 17-years before this wooden covered bridge was destroyed by an ice flow February 5, 1832. If one counts the major streets (not avenues or alleys) in Wrightsville, starting at Hellam Street (Route 462), and going north one has Locust Street, Walnut Street, Cherry Street and Vine Street. The next major street, on the 1824 map, is the street in line with the first bridge to Columbia and then there is one more street further north. I’ve placed those streets as dashed lines on the following Bing.com aerial view.

If one looks closely at the heavy “Bridge Street” dashed-line, projected out into the river, one sees that the remains of the piers from that first bridge continue to churn up the river water; as picked up on the aerial photo. With all the quarrying along “Bridge Street”, the five houses that existed along this street during 1824, are long since gone.

2015 Bing.com Aerial View of York County Side of Susquehanna River between Routes 30 and 462 (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

2015 Bing.com Aerial View of York County Side of Susquehanna River between Routes 30 and 462 (Annotations by S. H. Smith, 2015)

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

Posted in all posts, Bridges, Buildings, Lancaster County, Maps, Pennsylvania, Roads, Susquehanna River, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Funderland at York Mall & The Utter Place

Funderland Button (Submitted by Alicia “BBA” Helfrich)

Funderland Button (Submitted by Alicia “BBA” Helfrich)

A month ago, I wrote about Remembering the Early Years of the York Mall. Thanks to my readers for providing additional memories. Alicia Helfrich submitted the photo of her Funderland Button and these comments:

I wanted to add to your article on the York Mall. This was the place to hang out on the weekends before or after the movies, and before and after going roller skating. There were a few places skipped in your article that were a huge part of a teenager’s night hanging out at the mall.

Funderland! It was the arcade that you could find all your friends. I happen to be the queen of the asteroids game. My name always appeared at the top. The other place you could find your friends at was Lucas Pizza, found at the other end of the mall near the So-Fro Fabric Store and J.C. Penney. We also liked to walk into the Hickory Farms store found in the corner near the stairway. We enjoyed getting the free samples of cheeses and crackers. I have many great memories of the York Mall as others do too.

I remember that the Trans-Lux Movie Theater end of the mall eventually got tagged with the Arcade Area label, since that is where Funderland was located. I checked into why Funderland was not in the 1971 list of stores from my previous post.

FunderlandCThis illustration is from the records of The United States Patent and Trademark Office. The Word Mark FUNDERLAND included the shown Design plus Funderland words. The submission indicated this mark was first used in commerce on May 10, 1973. The Funderland trademark was issued to Leisure Recreation Services, Inc. of Camp Hill, PA. The York Directories indicate that Funderland opened in the York Mall between 1973 and 1974; therefore in agreement with the trademark registration. Likewise the York Directories indicated that Lucas Pizza opened in the York Mall between 1972 and 1973.

UdderPlaceI received more Funderland comments from Kathy Miller, but with a twist: “What happened to Funderland on you list of York Mall businesses? We’d always hang out there, especially before or after a movie. If Funderland got crowded at the York Mall, someone in our crowd would always suggest ‘Let’s go to the udder place;’ our code for the other Funderland.”

“Did you know that there was a Funderland in the Queensgate Shopping Center? It was one of the stores located at the site of today’s Frank Theaters. There was an ice cream place near that Funderland, called The Udder Place; a nice play on words.” The Udder Place ad/coupon comes from the February 16, 1977, issue of the York Daily Record.

The Funderland in Queensgate opened in 1976, along with other stores in what was called the Queensgate Mall Addition within the Queensgate Shopping Center. Eventually this addition contained small screen movie theaters, however the whole Queensgate Mall Addition was torn down to build the much nicer Frank Theaters.

The following coupon for a Free Game at the Funderland in Queensgate, could also be redeemed at the York Mall Funderland. The ad/coupon comes from the November 24, 1976, issue of the York Daily Record.

FunderlandB

Related posts include:

Reading the HEADLINES; A Quick Index to ALL YorksPast Posts

Posted in all posts, Businesses, Pennsylvania, York County | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment