Finding significant Dempwolf design features in venerable York, Pa., church

Linked in/Neat stuff: Climbing Gettysburg’s Longstreet Tower/Murals of York quiz
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Charles H. Glatfelter writes in ‘York County Lutherans’ that St. John’s Church went up in 1875. Architectural specialist Terry Downs, who is looking at some of this building’s many significant features, writes that this was designer John A. Dempwolf’s first commission. So a lot of history comes together at 140 W. King St. (See additional photos on Terry Downs’ Facebook page). Also of interest: Dempwolf architects built York’s skyline, history.

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This is the view from St. John’s Lutheran’s West King Street bell tower. The community-minded congregation, part of the Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod, goes by First St. John’s. That distinguishes it from the Mount Rose Avenue congregation, St. John’s. ‘York County Lutherans’ states that the congregation voted to sell the West King Street building in 1968 and conduct St. John’s activities at 2580 Mount Rose Avenue. About 200 congregants stayed with the West King Street building and started the First St. John’s ministry, which continues to this day.  Charles Glatfelter writes that German-language worship services were held at West King Street as late as 1944, when they were discontinued. Also of interest: ‘On the Codorus’ tells about early Lutherans in York County.

Other neat stuff from all over … .

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York countian Roy Flinchbaugh has done some effective sleuthing. He noted the movies showing at the old HiWay Theater in this story and determined the photo’s date at 1945: Continue reading “Finding significant Dempwolf design features in venerable York, Pa., church” »

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7 reasons why Indian Steps Museum stands as ‘an amazing place … in York County’

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Indian Steps Museum, along the Susquehanna River in southeastern York County, Pa., is seen several years ago after heavy rains damaged the grounds. John E. Vandersloot, a York attorney, built what would become a York County landmark, in stages starting from 1910 to 1912. Also of interest: On York County parks, Susquehannocks and carved river rocks.

Don Linebaugh is  director of the University of Maryland’s Historic Preservation Program.

He’s a York County resident and active in the Stewartstown Historical Society. And he traveled to Glen Rock this week to talk about another area of expertise, John E. Vandersloot and his retreat, Indian Steps Museum.

The Glen Rock Historic Preservation Society was interested in Vandersloot and his property because the future York attorney was born in 1869 in that southern York County borough.

So here are 7 points from Don Linebaugh’s presentation about Vandersloot and Indian Steps, which the professor assessed as “an amazing place, or space, in York County.”

Continue reading “7 reasons why Indian Steps Museum stands as ‘an amazing place … in York County’” »

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Visitors to York County, Pa.: Don’t be like the British and let a town fool you

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This is the scene in the square of St. Michaels, Md., occupied by cannon, plaques and the St. Michaels Museum. This small  grassy area is tucked into a neighborhood, and its attractions beckon to visitors to spend time there. Also of interest: John Wilkes Booth grew up not far from York County’s southern border.

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This Maryland town’s story goes like this.

In the War of 1812, British vessels fronted the town – a place known for its shipyards and an important position on the Chesapeake Bay.

But the town’s residents were ahead of the invaders. They doused lights and put up lanterns in trees beyond the town.

The British unloaded their cannons but overshot the dark town. One house – known today as the Cannonball House – sustained damage. But the British left, and the town was spared.

To this day, this story – or maybe reported story – gives this place the slogan: ‘The town that fooled the British.’

St. Michaels is that town, and it’s a major tourist attraction on the Eastern Shore.

Continue reading “Visitors to York County, Pa.: Don’t be like the British and let a town fool you” »

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Presidential candidate Jimmy Carter didn’t stop in York in 1976, but York visited him

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Robert G. Leichliter, then-York City School Board president in York City and candidate for a state representative seat, met Jimmy Carter in Harrisburg in September 1976. Less than two months later, Carter gained the presidency in a win against Gerald Ford. Here, he’s handing presidential candidate Carter a political brochure. Also of interest: Jimmy Carter in York County: ‘He knelt down and prayed‘ and Check out this list of presidential visits to York County.

Mike Leichliter is from York and now serves as Penn Manor school superintendent in Lancaster County.

The York High graduate’s father, Robert G. Leichliter, also stood on the public stage.

He led York City School Board in the mid-1970s. It was then that he met Jimmy Carter.

In an interesting account of a political moment almost 40 years ago, Mike Leichliter wrote about his father’s meeting with the future president: Continue reading “Presidential candidate Jimmy Carter didn’t stop in York in 1976, but York visited him” »

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York County’s Brook Leaf Tree House: ‘As kids, we all thought that was SO romantic

Before there was the Haines Shoe House, there was Brook Leaf Love Nest. The Shoe House (see below), now open as a bakery/ice cream shop under new management, followed the Love Nest as a honeymoon spot in York County, Pa. The Love Nest is long gone after a fire, but memories continue. Marcia Lang commented on a Love Nest post on YorkTownSquare: ‘My aunt Edie and uncle Turk (Edith and Mervin Myers) were married in Washington, DC in 1927 and spent their honeymoon in the “tree house”. We had always known the story. About 15 years ago, their grand-daughter (Tina Wallace) wrote into “Around Town” — the Dispatch? — asking for any information. I have the original article but do not have the later article confirming the “tree house”. As kids, we all thought that was SO romantic.’ Also of interest: Check out these additional quizzes and (fun) tests.

Other History Mystery quizzes from this past week: Continue reading “York County’s Brook Leaf Tree House: ‘As kids, we all thought that was SO romantic” »

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Neff’s one-room school in Red Lion: ‘It’s dilapidated now. But it’s going to be really great soon’

Linked in/Neat stuff: Mud sale defined/Test your Glen Rock smarts

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Red Lion, Pa., students work on the old Neff School near the high school. That’s good practical education, for one thing. And this means the preservation of another one-room school. At one time, York County had about 300 of these schools, but some that weren’t converted into houses, businesses or museums are deteriorating. In recent years, we’ve seen rehab work around the county.  The Foustown school in Manchester Township rehabbed into a livable residence. An old school near York Haven has been restored. The stone Hyson schoolhouse in southeastern York County is being excavated, bringing forth finds about early public education in Pennsylvania. Now this Red Lion school is being restored. ‘It’s dilapidated now,’ teacher John Royer said. ‘But it’s going to be really great soon.’ (See map showing relative location of Neff’s School below.) Also of interest: Check out these stories and photos about one-room schools in York County’s past. 

Continue reading “Neff’s one-room school in Red Lion: ‘It’s dilapidated now. But it’s going to be really great soon’” »

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York’s old HiWay moviehouse: ‘I have heard many people speak fondly of the theater’

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We’ve been tracking grand old facades, and here’s another great York, Pa., front – the HiWay Theatre in the 700 block of West Market Street. Notice the unguarded, unchained bicycles in this undated photo. And notice the signs for air conditioning, a popular feature of such venues before home units went in. In a short history of the theater, Cinema Treasures website places building of the theater before World War II and says it closed for good circa 1983.  The old theater building, sans facade remains standing and in productive use, is seen below… .

Continue reading “York’s old HiWay moviehouse: ‘I have heard many people speak fondly of the theater’” »

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Same shoe size, but Haines Shoe House is re-laced for the public to visit

Linked in/Neat stuff: Bruce Arians returns to York High/Are coyotes ugly?

You can see from the hundreds of likes, shares and comments on this York, Pa., Daily Record Facebook post that the Haines Shoe House, under new ownership and selling baked goods and more, has caught the interest of the public. (Feel free to join in). Mahlon ‘Shoe Wizard’ Haines built the Springettsbury Township roadside wonder in 1948 to serve, among other things, as a honeymoon place. It has become a symbol of York County, one of those places that people like to drive to and marvel. Now, there’s more of an opportunity to drop in. The new owners have expanded the attraction’s hours, plan tours and, as important as anything, will serve York County-made Beck’s Ice Cream. Check out the Shoe House’s Facebook page for details. Also of interest: Hallam’s New Year’s shoe drop: Brings York County’s Haines Shoe House to new heights and What is the Shoe House’s shoe size?

Other neat stuff from all over … .

Continue reading “Same shoe size, but Haines Shoe House is re-laced for the public to visit” »

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Historical marker to serve as 1 of York Water Co.’s 200th birthday candles

Linked in/Neat stuff: Boyhood home of Dominick Argento/Civil War fundraiser in Md.
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This is a neat photo from The Evening Sun’s Clare Becker. It looks like a three-eyed stoneheaded figure rising from the street. But as many know, this is the York Water Co.’s architecturally significant building on York, Pa.’s East Market Street. The water company is on the eve of its 200th anniversary, and will gain a Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission marker as part of its birthday observances. See interior photo below, and check out the water company’s history. Also of interest: 275th birthday observance of York’s founding isn’t a sexy number but may be effective.

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Continue reading “Historical marker to serve as 1 of York Water Co.’s 200th birthday candles” »

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Obscure York plaque points to young, unsung hero of World War I

Linked in/Neat stuff: Lincoln’s funeral train/Snow geese in flight
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Reminders about our history are everywhere around York, Pa. Here’s one. This plate is affixed to the door in the former home of the Visiting Nurse Association in the 200 block of York’s East Market St. Those furnishings are long gone, VNA is operating elsewhere and the building is usefully deployed by Keystone Auctions. But this York Daily Record photo gives us an opportunity to bring forth word of this unsung hero, Jeannette Zinn. In this story about Ms. Zinn, I wrote that a room was furnished in the Girls’ Club in York. It appears that the VNA played host to the Girls’ Club because here’s that room. Also of interest: Keystone Auctions’ venue, former York VNA building, combines historic location and grand interior.

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Other important/interesting stories from all over … .

Lincoln’s funeral train stopped in York as part of its solemn U.S. tour 150 years ago.

But sometimes overlooked is that it had to pass through the many York County communities on its way to and from the county seat.

This useful website shows those towns that witnessed the train – Glen Rock, Mount Wolf, York Haven and more.

Continue reading “Obscure York plaque points to young, unsung hero of World War I” »

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