York Safe & Lock expert: ‘People are always asking me what a safe is worth?’

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You’ve met southeastern York County, Pa., businessman Fred Beihl before. He’s an auctioneer and appraiser, which brings him into contact with valuable things from the past. One specialty is safes. And locks. And old products from York Safe & Lock. Of course, all products from York Safe & Lock are old. The company stopped doing business by that name circa 1942, when its owner and mastermind S. Forry Laucks died. Back to Fred, who is always generous with his insights, and this particular York safe, a 450 pounder.

Read more of this story, with photos below.

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Atop Chickies Rock: The lower Susquehanna River’s No. 1 lookout post

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Digging Camp Security/Yorktowne Hotel’s lobby, 1956

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Ah, the popular view of the Susquehanna River – and York County across the waterway – from Chickies Rock. This is looking upstream. Chickies Rock is name after the American Indian word Chiquesalunga meaning “place of the crayfish.” The park surrounding it is well watered  – a mecca for crayfish – with the Susquehanna River and Chiques and Donegal creeks running through its 400-plus acres. This York, Pa., Daily Record photo comes from story: Spend a day down by the river in Wrightsville, Marietta and Columbia.  This FlipSidePa.com story takes a different view on the river towns: ‘Nestled along the Susquehanna River, the towns of Marietta, Wrightsville and Columbia represent themselves as “historic” more than they use the word “fun.” But they could and should.’ Also of interest:  When you enjoy this view from Chickies Rock, how how high above the Susquehanna are you?

Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

Roy Flinchbaugh is a longtime reader of my history stuff and an astute observer of the York scene. I always read his emails with a sense of discovery.

Here’s a recent exchange that might answer a question that you have:

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How bad is crime in York, Pa.? It’s an old question for the city but a good one

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The fair question has been posed: How bad is crime in York City? Here are two responses: The downtown’s core is safe and is increasingly inviting. And what’s new about crime in York city or, for that matter, in York County? Not to minimize the seriousness of this, but it’s been with us since before the county was founded. In fact, that’s why it was founded. This photo shows the newly tagged WeCo area and West Philadelphia Street, with Otterbein United Methodist Church, right, and the YMCA towering over the neighborhood. Also of interest: The Judicial Center: Is it York County’s 4th or 5th courthouse?

Kim Bartenslager of Dillsburg traveled to York Township’s Heritage Hills for the annual York Daily Record/WGAL town meeting in April.

When we asked the audience what was top of mind, he presented a smart question about violent crime in York city:

“Is it as bad as it seems, or is the media overblowing it?” Continue reading “How bad is crime in York, Pa.? It’s an old question for the city but a good one” »

Posted in A civil action, All politics is local, Archives, all posts, Cops & courts, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, York City neighborhoods | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Emigsville’s Emig Mansion: 3 views of this wonderful York County landmark

Linked in/Neat stuff: Iconic names Utz, Clarks, Harley-Davidson in news/LBJ’s visit in 1966
The Emig Mansion Bed & Breakfast. Paul Kuehnel - Daily Record/Sunday News
The Emig Mansion is one of York County, Pa.’s finest homes. It’s been a bed-and-breakfast in recent years and will remain so, under new hosts. The operators, Bill and Lori Fitzell, are presenting the mansion’s Civil War connection. And rightly so. Emigville was swarming with Confederates before the Battle of Gettysburg. Jubal Early’s rebel division was spread out in Emigsville and throughout York County’s central valley. Historian Scott Mingus says homeowner and prominent businessman John Emig Jr. negotiated a deal with the Confederates to save his home and provide enough food for his family. The invaders damaged his businesses. Check out two more Emig Mansion images below. Also of interest: Transportation-oriented Emigsville a walkable York-area community with lots of community.

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Primary Day History Mystery: This elected official, with a common touch, knew U.S. presidents

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History Mystery, Pennsylvania Primary Election Day style: This York countian, right, has been a leader in his home county and a friend of U.S. presidents for decades. At the same time, this former educator has a common touch. Here, he meets Sen. Joe Lieberman. Can you ID this achiever? Have you ever met him? Answer: http://goo.gl/amnJID or see photo of this elected official early in his career at bottom. Also of interest: Check out these additional quizzes and fun tests.

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Test your York Smarts with 5 more quizzes below. Click on the date if the photo does not appear on your mobile device.

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Vacuum cleaner hospital? Yes, York, Pa.’s hosted one since 1928

Linked in/Neat stuff: Fun facts about Haar’s Drive-in/Exploring New Freedom
Charles H. Miller, left, and worker Jacob Burgard at Miller Brothers Vacuum Cleaner Hospital Monday as it looked in 1958 Submitted - Daily Record/Sunday News Picturing History
Last month, the York, Pa., Daily Record’s Paul Kuehnel explored Roosevelt TV’s longtime business on, yes, Roosevelt Avenue in York. Now comes Paul with  photo essay and story on another city business that just seems to have been there forever – Miller Brothers Vacuum Cleaner Hospital, 357 W. Philadelphia St. Here, Charles H. Miller, left, and worker Jacob Burgard  pose outside  as it looked in 1958 … .

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Charlie Miller, left, and Dave Miller at Miller Brothers Vacuum Cleaner Hospital Monday April 14 2015 at 357 Philadelphia St. in York.  Paul Kuehnel - Daily Record/Sunday News Picturing History
And here, Charlie Miller, left, and Dave Miller replicate that photo in April. The business was founded in 1928 and has been in the Miller family since 1958. About the business, Charlie Miller told Paul: “I could say it sucks and blows, I guess, but other than that, everything is fine.” Then he  added with a laugh, “They keep trying to reinvent the vacuum cleaner, and that is what they (vacuums) do, they move air.” Also of interest: Orange Car on York’s Roosevelt Avenue: Workers sometimes shoveled fruit out of box cars.

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Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .
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Civil War chaplain S. Morgan Smith: This Moravian pastor went to war

Linked in/Neat stuff: Camp Security dig to resume/Who is this Rock & Roll Hall of Famer from York, Pa.?

The Rev. S. Morgan SmithSubmitted

Before S. Morgan Smith was an industrialist – perhaps the leading industrialist in York County, Pa.’s, history – he was a pastor. And early in his call as a minister, he served as a military chaplain. He was mustered out of the military 150 years ago, and his biographers have set up a presentation to tell about how this minister came to serve in the military. Also of interest: S. Morgan Smith and P.H. Glatfelter head list of York County industrial movers and shakers.

How did North Carolina native Stephen Morgan Smith end up in the Union Army?

And how did Smith, an ordained minister with the pacifist Moravian church, gain the OK from his Protestant denomination to serve in the military? Continue reading “Civil War chaplain S. Morgan Smith: This Moravian pastor went to war” »

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How do you move a gallows? York, Pa.’s relocating Police Heritage Museum will figure that out

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Dan Connolly’s O’s book/York Jeopardy game will challenge you
Police Heritage Museum founder John Stine shows an old photograph of a York City police officer in a back room in the museum in York on Thursday, May 7, 2015. The museum has about 2,000 photographs that are not on display. The museum, which was founded in 1995, is looking for a new location after finalizing a deal to sell its West Market Street building to Royal Square Development. Operated as a non-profit, the museum displays many artifacts with York County origins, as well as items from across the nation and other countries. Chris Dunn — Daily Record/Sunday News

York, Pa.’s Police Heritage Museum’s collections go beyond the many artifacts from its law enforcement past on public display. Here, John Stine, the go-to person with questions about that long police history, shows a photo of an officer in a museum storage room, one of about 2,000 such pictures not on display. The Heritage Museum’s collections, both exhibited and in storage, will have to be moved this year.That move would include a popular exhibit – a reconstructed gallows from the old York County Prison on Chestnut Street.  Royal Square has purchased the museum’s longtime West Market Street home. ‘The city has made us feel welcome here and we understand the importance of redevelopment,’ Stine told the York Daily Record/Sunday News. Also of interest: Check out this photo of a reconstructed 1800s jail cell at the Police Museum.

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A display at the Police Heritage Museum in York shows members of the 1973 York City Police Department on Thursday, May 7, 2015. The museum, which was founded in 1995, is looking for a new location after finalizing a deal to sell its West Market Street building to Royal Square Development. Operated as a non-profit, the museum displays many artifacts with York County origins, as well as items from across the nation and other countries. Chris Dunn — Daily Record/Sunday News
The York City Police force in 1973, one of the many displays at the Police Heritage Museum. One observer of the city scene, Terry Downs, suggested on his Facebook page that the Police Museum combine with the west end York Fire Museum to form a First Responders Museum. Also of interest: Those in uniform with York County links who die in line of duty should be remembered.

 

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For a century-plus in southern York County, Catholic Valley hosted a church

Shaffer's Church, circa 1940s. Courtesy Codorus Valley Chronicles

Many people are familiar with Catholic Valley Road near Larue in southern York County. But today there’s no church in that valley. The current edition of the Codorus Valley Chronicles explores the story of that building, St. Peter and Paul Catholic Church, pictured above. ‘In 1853, a group of Catholic families from Kurhessen, Germany came to Codorus Township and purchased land in a valley south of Shaffer’s Church, and the valley came to be known as Catholic Valley,’ the newsletter of the Codorus Valley History Society stated. Also of interest: Codorus Valley preservation group promotes history of other towns, too.

The sign is enough to intrigue you.

Catholic Valley Road.

In the middle of a region settled by German Protestants outside of Glen Rock

But there were German Catholics, too, and they worshiped at St. Peter and Paul Catholic Church.

The church stood from 1871 to 1975.

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York County, Pa., enjoys its big anniversaries, Part II: And there’s even more history to enjoy

Amid all this hustle and bustle of the market place in the autumn of 1927 and the general discomboomeration that marked the era, York found time to put ona a eally creditable Sesquicentennial celebration of the meeting in York of the Continental Congress inthe winter of 1777-79. Pagentry and parades highlighted the program in which thousands took part on the fairgrounds adn on streets decoratedin a manner reminiscent of the big Centennial celebration of 1899.  Photo courtesy York 225th Anniversary Program

The year was 1887, and Borough of York, Pa., turned into the City of York, Pa. This came exactly 100 years after the Village of York became the Borough of York. All this called for a major celebration, and the arches in York’s Centre Square went up. Two longtime Centre Square market sheds just been torn down. Notice the flag pole that stood between those two market sheds stands here, acting as a tether for the ropes bearing banners. You can detect what looks like a former footprint of one market shed to the east of the flagpole. This is one of many celebrations of anniversaries and other moments that involved this square, now Continental Square. See: York County enjoys its big anniveraries, Part I. Also of interest: Since 1887, York mayors have dealt with the serious – and the silly.

The year was 1741, and Penn family agent Thomas Cookson was in the future village of York, Pa.

In fact, he was making the village of York, Pa., a reality by ably using his surveying equipment to lay out the area east of the Codorus Creek into squares.

He was not alone. Two local chain bearers helped him – Baltzer Spengler and Ulrich Whissler.

Those two men had traveled to Philadelphia in 1739 to meet with the Penns to set this survey plan into motion.

Cookson used the grids of Philadelphia as a model, and York’s squares came in at 480 feet wide and 520 feet long. Continue reading “York County, Pa., enjoys its big anniversaries, Part II: And there’s even more history to enjoy” »

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