Foodstrucks have been rolling along York streets for decades

Linked in/Neat stuff: Dead Red Bats/Bury’s burgers in Springettsbury
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Long before Foodstruck invaded York County for two events, food trucks – or food cycles – patrolled the streets of York County, Pa. The Yorkco Ice driver sits on a Harley-Davidson motorcycle – much later made in York. For a third time, Foodstruck will come to York – to Penn Park Sunday, Aug. 31. Also of interest: Foodstruck event offers insight about the direction York is heading.

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How’s this for a unlikely combo: Bierman’s sells ice cream and oysters – two iconic York County dishes? Of Sunday’s third Foodstruck – this one at a new location in Penn Park – an organizer said: “We’re trying to turn it into an all-day, more festival feel,” Given said. Also of interest: Can once-grand Penn Park become grand again?

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Digging Camp Security: 10 ways to know more York’s British POW camp

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First they tilled the Springettsbury Township field, and then volunteers and trained archaeologists went to work. They found some 18th-century artifacts, significant because this could be the site of Camp Security, the British prisoner-of-war camp that operated from 1781 to 1783.  Also of interest:  Researcher pulling together strands to weave story of British POW Camp Security.

The other day, a knowledgeable York countian said he never really understood Camp Security. He thought for years the camp from the American Revolution was run by the British. But then after seeing news of the dig on the presumed site, he understood that the Redcoats did not cross the Susquehanna River. In fact, 2,000-something British prisoners were detained at the site.

So there’s one example of the value of the archaeological work in Springettsbury Township.

So whether you’re catching up or just want to know more about the camp and the dig there this week, here are 10 links that will help.

Continue reading “Digging Camp Security: 10 ways to know more York’s British POW camp” »

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How one big York, Pa., building tells an even larger story


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This 210 York Street  building houses members of the rock band Live’s recording studio and headquarters of United Fiber & Data and Think Loud, among other enterprises. Before Live moved into this 53,000-square-foot space, Bi-Comp was in there. And before Bi-Comp, Maple Press operated there. Also of interest: Live’s plans for old Bi-Comp building part of memorable news cycle.

Buildings are artifacts and tell a story about York County’s past and present, much like those buttons and coins uncovered in Springettsbury Township will reveal much about life in the American Revolution’s Camp Security.

So a study of Think Loud’s York Street building – inside and out and from atop and above – can tell us about a changing York County. The following photos provide an exposition of a building-sized artifact:

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Continue reading “How one big York, Pa., building tells an even larger story” »

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York’s Knights of Malta temple: ‘And what a building it was’

Linked in/Neat stuff: Camp Security dig underway/10 favorite history books?
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In the late 1950s throught the 1970s, many historic York, Pa., buildings were demolished, often to provide parking to allow city retailers to compete against suburban shopping centers. This building’s site was put to a different purpose. It came down, but another stately office building took its place in 1959 – the headquarters for J.E. Baker Co. No parking lot was allowed on this prime 232 E. Market St. spot. Gordon Freireich told about the original building , dedicated in 1922, in a recent York Sunday News column: The Malta Temple: a place of celebrations. Its dimensions reflected the mood of the Roaring 20s:  63½ feet wide and 250 deep. That’s 80 yards back from East Market St. ‘And what a building it was,’ Gordon wrote. Today, the site is ready for a new life. The neighboring York County Heritage Trust, current owner, has the building for sale. Also of interest:  Adding up all its clubs, organizations and churches, York County, Pa., is a quietly social place.

Interesting stuff from all over … .

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Check out your York, Pa., smarts with this history quiz

It was serendipity that it worked out this way, but the answers to the quiz above and the one immediately below rest in one York, Pa., law firm. In other words, the two attorneys who are answers for those two quizzes are principals with the same law firm. I won’t name the firm because it will give away the answers. But I’ve already given enough clues for you to participate by commenting, liking or sharing. If you’re stumped, click on the goo.gl link. Feel free to engage in the other quizzes in the same way. Also of interest: Here are additional quizzes to test your knowledge of York County and York County history.

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York, Pa.’s, unforgettable landmark: Lincoln Highway Garage

Linked in/Neat stuff: Digging at Camp Security/Question about one-room  school

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The Lincoln Highway Garage was an often-photographed landmark in the York area. And why not? It went back to the early days of the Lincoln Highway, opening for business in 1921. Its proprietors provided over-the-top service before that became a cliche. The restaurant was welcome on a night like this – in 1950 – before fast-food started coming into the York area about 1970. But the old landmark came down 10 years ago, and a modern convenience store went up in time for a 2005 dedication. That provides an interesting old-and-new comparison in itself – the transition from full-service stations to self service in the form of a Turkey Hill store that adapted themes from the old garage into its design. This post when Royal Farms went in on Route 30, the Lincoln Highway’s bypass, discusses this change a bit more. See the full slate in the Picturing History series. Also of interest: Here is another view of the Lincoln Highway Garage/Turkey Hill before-and-after combo.

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Neat stuff from all over … .

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Getting to know Mount Wolf, Tom Wolf’s hometown, in 10 easy links

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Mount Wolf borough sits in the center of this undated picture. That road running diagonally starting at about 7 o’clock gives it away – the longtime main connector between Mount Wolf and its neighboring borough, Manchester. The terrain looks flat here, of course, but it’s actually rolling. The town was a summit on the railroad, the source of ‘Mount.’ Interest is growing in Mount Wolf, Pennsylvania gubernatorial candidate Tom Wolf’s home in boyhood and adulthood. Also of interest: Wolf Man. Wolfchester. No, the Village of Mount Wolf.

For years, Charles Stambaugh has been involved with Mount Wolf’s history documentation, 2010 centennial, website, and museum planning. He even has an official Mount Wolf job, as the borough’s tax collector.

So he knows what’s going on in Mount Wolf, and what is going on is that people from far and wide are interested in this borough of about 1,400.

“We reprinted our history book, and they are selling like hot cakes, and our website is seeing a lot of traffic,” he told York Daily Record photographer Paul Kuehnel. “Everyone is interested in where the possible new governor lives.”

That candidate for governor, of course, is Mount Wolf’s own Tom Wolf.

So inspired by Charlie’s enthusiasm about Mount Wolf,  we, too, will try to be helpful by hereby providing 10 links about Mount Wolf, past and present: Continue reading “Getting to know Mount Wolf, Tom Wolf’s hometown, in 10 easy links” »

Posted in All politics is local, Archives, all posts, Books & reading, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Mount Wolf - The Town, Small-town life, York County's Tom Wolf | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

‘FOE’ Civil War exhibit lives to fight another day in York, Pa.

Wayne Whites exhibit moves to new quarters

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You might call this the largest cardboard recycling project ever in York County. It means Wayne White’s ‘FOE’ exhibit will live to fight another day.  Earlier this week, York College of Pennsylvania students carried the dismantled cardboard-and-wood exhibit or installation from MarketView Arts on West Philadelphia Street to LSC Design on North George. The exhibit by the noted White showed everyday life for the two days that the Confederate Army occupied York in late-June 1863. The exhibit ended, and its figures will reside in storage at LSC for display at yet undetermined places in York County. For more on the move, check out FOE. More photos below. For a review of the installation, check out: ‘FOE’ in old F.O.E. lodge is no foe of York, Pa.

Some artists have come to York County, performed their good work and then left. Wayne White is in that category. Others lived here most of their life. Think Lewis Miller. Others grew up here, left to make their mark and have kept strong ties here. Jeff Koons is in that category.

The current movement in York City to attract and promote artists – ‘Creativity Unleashed’ – has a strong body of such work to grow from. The artists pictured below and others have unleashed their creativity in York County or beyond.

The question is: Who’s next to make a lasting contribution locally, regionally or worldwide?

See a sampling of York County’s masters below … . Continue reading “‘FOE’ Civil War exhibit lives to fight another day in York, Pa.” »

Posted in Archives, all posts, Art & artists, Civil War, Cliff Satterthwaite, Explanations/controversy, Famous York visitors, For photo fans, Lewis Miller, Local journalism & Web, War, William Falkler, William Wagner | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

‘Lewis Miller’s People:’ New book portrays 700-plus York countians in the 1800s

Linked in/Neat stuff: The Strand in 1958/White Rose Week?
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Donald Shelley, executive director of the Henry Ford Museum, said the 1966 publication of 19th-century York countian Lewis Miller’s work would provide a service for students and historians in opening up a new field of study in American social life, customs, arts and the like. His prediction came true. Now a complementary volume to that now-out-of-print book is becoming available in the fall. ‘Lewis Miller’s People’ is a collection of more than 700 of Lewis Miller’s portraits in the collection of the York County Heritage Trust. Lila Fourhman-Shaull, the trust’s archivist, and June Lloyd, her predecessor in that position, edited this hardcover work, priced at $49.95. To place a pre-sale order, email Lila Fourhman-Shaull. Shelley also said that the 1966 book ‘Lewis Miller, Sketches and Chronicles’ would be a fascinating pictorial album. ‘Lewis Miller’s People’ will fill the same bill: offer avenues for further study and engage the casual reader. Both might find portraits of relatives in there. Also of interest: William Wagner, Lewis Miller made York, Pa. ‘one of the most highly depicted communities in the early nineteenth century United States’ and Other YorkTownSquare posts relating to Lewis Miller, in full or in part.
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Neat stuff from all over … .

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Love getting emails like this from Jaime Fusco:

Continue reading “‘Lewis Miller’s People:’ New book portrays 700-plus York countians in the 1800s” »

Posted in Archives, all posts, Art & artists, Books & reading, Cliff Satterthwaite, Events, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Genealogy/research, Lewis Miller, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Longtime York families, Notable images, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Underground Railroad on the Susquehanna: From Havre de Grace, Md., to Cooperstown, N.Y.

Linked in/Neat stuff: New Oxford’s liberation set/Color Works to be developed
dkActress Monika Ross is seen in the character of York County’s Amanda Berry in the play ‘Susquehanna to Freedom: The Role of the Susquehanna River in the Underground Railroad.’ Dr. Dorothy King, a York native, will present about PennOwl Production’s play on Sept. 6 at the York County Heritage Trust. A news release says the drama tells the story of three slaves who traveled from Havre de Grace, Md. – where the Susquehanna River enters the Chesapeake Bay. They make their way up the Susquehanna River to Cooperstown, N.Y., where the Susquehanna begins. Ten non-fiction county stories about local Underground Railroad activities in areas that border the Susquehanna are presented within this framework. The actual play will be performed at York College on Sept. 20. Also of interest: York native, playwright Dorothy E. King earning place in history.

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Neat stuff from all over … .

Here’s another interesting event, set for Sept. 20: The “Liberation of New Oxford.” Continue reading “Underground Railroad on the Susquehanna: From Havre de Grace, Md., to Cooperstown, N.Y.” »

Posted in American Revolution, Archives, all posts, Black history, Civil War, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Nostalgia & memories, Susquehanna, waterways, Underground Railroad, War, World War II | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment