Where does the ‘red’ in Red Land Little League come from?

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Many buildings in the Red Land region of York County, Pa., used local minerals as building materials. Such is the case of Lewisberry’s Redlands Meetinghouse, one of a band of Quaker houses of worship in the region. Long ago, the red sandstone gave this northern tip of York County its name. Also of interest: Redlands Meetinghouse is on this list as 1 of 6 sites to discover and explore.

The Red Land Little League team’s success raises the question: Where does the “red” in Red Land come from?

The short answer: From a rock.

It’s a particular rock, red sandstone, found primarily in the northern part of York County.

York County historian Jim Rudisill provided information for this tour of  the area generally north of the Conewago Creek in this YorkTownSquare.com post: Big Conewago serves as physical, symbolic divider of York County culture. Continue reading “Where does the ‘red’ in Red Land Little League come from?” »

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This closed-down mystery drive-in theater in Southcentral Pennsylvania begs you to stop and take a look

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Leno visited Harley-Davidson/Artist William Wagner’s seal
theater
Seeing something like this around Southcentral Pa. for the first time will cause some lovers of history and nostalgia to pull over and take a look. And pull out your cell phone to document this scene. It’s a deserted drive-in theater, complete with the snack bar/projection booth, ticket booth and a smattering of speaker-less stands. Most drive-ins fell prey to developers – and video stores and their online descendants. And, reportedly in this case, to the need for digital projection equipment. The old theaters’ expansive green space along major highways made them valuable to builders. The Stonybrook Drive-in,  East York, and the Lincoln Drive-In in West Manchester Township are two examples of that. In SouthCentral Pennsylvania, two drive-ins continue to operate. Haar’s, near Dillsburg, and the Cumberland, near Newville, in Cumberland County. A commenter on a old theater website made this enticing comment in 2005 about the drive-in shown here: ‘The back row of the … is often used by the local Amish who come with their horse and buggies and listen to the sound on portable radios.’ Can you locate this deteriorating screen? See the answer below. Also of interest: Old Watling scale rescued from York’s HiWay Theater: It still tells your weight – and your fortune.

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Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

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Posted in Antiquing & artifacts, Archives, all posts, Art & artists, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Nostalgia & memories, Small-town life, Unsung/obscure sites, William Wagner | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thomasville-area’s Biesecker’s Mill: ‘It’s a unique property, but evidently it’s so unique that no bank will touch it’

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Addition to New Oxford’s square/Street art going unnoticed?
bmBiesecker’s Mill is one of the most architecturally interesting mills standing in York County, Pa., today. An adaptive reuse plan to convert this Thomasville-area building into apartments is in limbo, though. ‘It’s a unique property, but evidently it’s so unique that no bank will touch it. So we’re kind of stuck here,’ owner Eric Bickleman told the York Daily Record. The rangy, pre-Civil War mill measures in at 17,000-square-feet. So with its future unclear (a GoFundMe site is set up), we’ll look at its past. The book ‘Millers’ Tales’ gives these facts about the mill. Products made there in its milling days: White Lily and White Swan flour, Yorko Dog Food, Golden Corn mill. Types of milling done there: grist, saw and distillery. The Biesecker in the name comes from one of its owners, John Biesecker. Also of interest: Where does York County’s Biesecker Mill get its name?
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Discover these 17 neat places in your own York County, Pa., backyard. Actually, make that 18.

fairmount

Fairmount Park in Red Lion has a splash park, picnic area, modern playground and much more. It’s a place to play or just sit. And let’s not forget, it has a stately war memorial – as stately as any in York County, Pa. It’s a place to awaiting discovery. Also of interest: Five things to know about Red Lion’s grand Fairmount Park.

We’re constantly adding to this Places to Discover in Your Own York County Backyard series.

Today, we added one – Fairmount Park in Red Lion. Continue reading “Discover these 17 neat places in your own York County, Pa., backyard. Actually, make that 18.” »

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This York County, Pa., mystery estate sits on a hillside, but its putting green is flat

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This beautiful ‪‎York County, Pa.,‬ estate, now a library and wedding venue, retains the putting green used by its owner. Where is this hillside estate? Have you been up there for an event? Please comment below. Here’s the answer. Also of interest: Check out these additional History Mystery quizzes and (fun) tests.

Here are 6 more History Mystery quizzes from this past week. (Click on the date if the photo does not appear on your mobile device)… .

Continue reading “This York County, Pa., mystery estate sits on a hillside, but its putting green is flat” »

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Sears, Roebuck in York, Pa.: The retailer was an early adopter of the move to suburbia

Linked in/Neat stuff: New use for Lafayette Club/Broad Street Market’s night hours

sears
Ah, yes, the old Sears building on West Market Street, York, Pa., as seen in this York County Heritage Trust photo. Its many signs make sure there’s no mistaking that you could shop at Sears here. This Sears store was a noteworthy retailer in York’s downtown story because it was an early adopter of a suburban location. It opened its store in York’s eastern suburbs in the mid-1950s – at the time that Caterpillar was building up and Haines Acres was building out. It was the anchor to the popular York County Shopping Center, now often referred as the revamped center where Red Lobster operates in Springettsbury Township.  Ten years later, many York retailers had either moved or were considering branches at suburban sites. For a short story about these times of suburban migration, check out: From top dog and hot dogs to dogfight and dog days in York County, Pa. And check out the view of this building today and other photos of York County landmarks at: Now and then. Notice the two buildings to the left. Those are known as the Gates House/Plough Tavern today. Also of interest: First the catalog. Now Sears ends its portrait center. What’s next?

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About artifacts in Hanover’s Clarks Shoe exhibit: ‘I have enough to fill it three times’

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Classical music takes over Central Market/Floating island at Kiwanis Lake

museum

Many readers here will remember going downtown on a Saturday to buy shoes and other clothes. That day seems to have passed with retailers selling their stuff mainly in the suburbs. That’s mainly. In Hanover, you can still shop for shoes on a Saturday and other days to the week. Clarks Shoes, known as Clarks Bostonian Outlet, is  open on the square, and there’s another dose of nostalgia now awaiting visitors. A local collector and Clarks employee Donald Hamme has put up a display of Hanover Shoes relics. Hamme told The Evening Sun in Hanover that when Harper “H.D.” Sheppard and Clinton “C.N.” Myers founded Hanover Shoes in 1899, the company’s motto at that time was to provide “the greatest shoe value on Earth.” Now Clarks customers get an extra value, a case exhibit showing  memorabilia, courtesy of Donald Hamme. ‘I have enough to fill it three times,’ Hamme told the Evening Sun. Check out this photo gallery by the Evening Sun’s Shane Dunlap. Also of interest: Downtown Hanover, Pa.: Here’s how a bird viewed ‘McAllistertown’s’ square 60 years ago.

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Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .
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York County, Pa.: Discover these 5 neat places in your own backyard

lock12
This is a scene awaiting discovery in York County, Pa. This falls is near the preserved Lock 12 on the long-gone Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal in southeastern York County. Here’s a map of the old lock area. And a photo of the lock. Background posts: A far different view of York County, Pennsylvania and water: The river runs through it, and Photographer tramps to the far reaches of York County.

 

 

 

 

I posted a photo and other information about Stone Mill 1792 a few weeks ago.

It drew this private message on Facebook:

‘Wanted to send you a thank you note yesterday for sharing the open house dates for the Stone Mill in Glenville.’

I responded: ‘Glad you found it helpful. Gave me the idea to put together a post on other not-well-known places that people might discover.

She answered: ‘Thanks! Friends have been commenting on not being aware of these places in their own backyards. Lots of fun discovering these neat finds so close to home.’

That’s encouraging!

So we’ll continue this series of neat places in York County and beyond that might interest you, hone your sense of discovery and prompt a visit. Continue reading “York County, Pa.: Discover these 5 neat places in your own backyard” »

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Creativity Unleashed at 5: On York, Pa.’s streets

street

Call it street art. Industrial art. Call it a concrete – or metal – example of the brand ‘Creativity Unleashed.’ This and other sculptures throughout York, Pa.’s downtown point to the idea of the city as  ‘America’s Industrial Art & Design Capital.’ For a map of this art, made from pieces of old machinery, check out: Industrial Art. Also of interest: Obscure F.O.E. building to become colorful beacon of York, Pa.’s renaissance.

York County had outdoors artwork on its streets as far back as 1927.

That’s when 16 large paintings were posted on poles around York’s square in the 1927 sesquicentennial of the adoption of the Articles of Confederation. Continue reading “Creativity Unleashed at 5: On York, Pa.’s streets” »

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Creativity Unleashed at 5: Growing arts/design community is helping define York, Pa, but is the brand driving that?

designThe Creativity Unleashed logo is atop its Facebook page devoted to this idea: ‘We are America’s Industrial Art and Design Capital.’ It was introduced to York in December 2014. It caught the eye of Chris Hertig, a York County resident, and that kicked off an engaging and important discussion about Creativity Unleashed on the  ‘Fixing York’ Facebook page. Also of interest: Tin man ponders York County’s past, present and future.

Chris Hertig has a lot of good ideas about community and history and life in York County.

So I always check out his guest columns in the York Sunday News and his posts on social media.

Here was one recent Hertig post on Fixing York, a York Daily Record-moderated Facebook group devoted to improving the quality of life in the city:

“Check this out!

“I never heard of this until recently.”

He pointed to this Facebook page – York County: Creativity Unleashed  – and the logo atop this page.

I waited a few days to see what type of engagement or response his post received from the page’s 1,500 fans.

The arts community is flourishing in York, but one rarely hears a reference to the themes of ‘Creativity Unleashed’ or ‘America’s Industrial Art & Design Capital.’

So I underscored some of the Creativity Unleashed ideas,  spawned by consultant Roger Brooks just over five years ago, before the Fixing York audience.

Here’s that dialogue, edited and excerpted:

 

LOCAL. Melanie Gaskins works off of her ipad as she paints a portrait of Martin Luther King Jr. on Saturday, Jan. 19. 2013. Artists helped complete a mural project for the national day of service associated with MLK day that reflect King's message. YORK DAILY RECORD/SUNDAY NEWS--JASON PLOTKIN
Another concrete illustration of Creativity Unleashed: Melanie Gaskins brings new technology, her iPad, to old-fashioned free hand art in painting a portrait of Martin Luther King. York has been good at bringing technology (often big machines) to bear on problems to create solutions.

Jim McClure: “That this post didn’t gain much ‘like,’ ‘sharing’ or ‘commenting’ love might be another indication that the Creativity Unleashed idea put up by consultant Roger Brooks didn’t formally catch on. The idea is illustrated by the image below: You have a mural pointing to York’s industrial past in which craftsmen worked with their heads/hearts/hands on the east side of a growing Marketview Arts venue for contemporary artists/designers, who work in the same way as their forebears. The creativity of the past and present shake hands. Yet even without the stickiness of the formal Creativity Unleashed brand, the growing arts community is helping define the city. Still, it seems the city – and the county for that matter – is in search of identity. Hershey has chocolate. Gettysburg, an epic battle for freedom. Lancaster, Amish and tourism. What is our brand? What do we stand for? What personality do we present? How do our residents – and visitors – interact with us?”
Continue reading “Creativity Unleashed at 5: Growing arts/design community is helping define York, Pa, but is the brand driving that?” »

Posted in All politics is local, Archives, all posts, Art & artists, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, York City neighborhoods | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment