‘Goin’ up t’ Muddy Creek, goin’ on the run': Linked in with neat York County, Pa., history stuff – Jan. 2, 2010

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Brittany Murphy, the young Hollywood actress who died recently, was a star of the movie ‘Girl Interrupted,’ filmed, in part, in southwestern York County, Pa.’s, Hanover. That serves as a reminder of another film ‘For Richer or Poorer,’ filmed, in part, in southeastern York County’s Muddy Creek Forks. Both were produced in the 1990s. Here, a York Daily Record story tells about extras used in the Muddy Creek Forks’ filming. The movie, featuring Tim Allen and Kirstie Alley, told about a high-flying husband and wife hiding among the Amish. At the time of the filming of the flop ‘For Richer or Poorer,’ real Amish people were just then moving across the Norman Wood Bridge from Lancaster County to southeastern York County and form a sizeable community today. Although York County is hardly a hotbed for Hollywood filming, a fair of York countians have gone on to stage or screen fame. Background posts: Who was Norman Wood (of bridge fame)?, Horse, buggy, one-room school make county comeback, Amish: ‘We are making a commitment to forgive.’

A mixed-bag of neat history stuff …
York County has long been known for its woodworking, particularly in the form of furniture making.
So, we often receive queries about people who have a prized piece of York County-made furniture that they want to know more about.
The fine work of Ebert Furniture, formerly of Red Lion, is one such maker.
This recent comment by Guy Bair on the post Red Lion’s Ebert Furniture: From bedroom suites to gunstocks is typical:

“I have a mahogany breakfront with a label on the
back with the following information. Ebert Furniture Co. Red Lion Pa. #25 Comb Mhg Breakfront.”

He said the piece was beautiful and asked for the approximate date that it was made.
When searching for such information, first Google the maker. In the case of Ebert, there’s a Web site devoted to its furniture.
I would then query the archives at the York County Heritage Trust and Historic York Inc. These sources will probably have information on when the furniture companies operated. Their researchers might also refer you to particularly local historic societies. In the case of Ebert, someone at the Red Lion Area Historical Society might have information. For a list of many such local historical groups, click here.
Doug Winemiller, a student of southeastern York County history, confirmed information from a previous correspondent that a Conservative Brethren Church near Winterstown is a former one-room school: “If this is the church on Swamp Road (Rt 216), I believe the structure was originally Hartman’s School–a former one room school in North Hopewell Twp.” The church was part of the recent York Town Square post: Southeastern York County, Pa., made for Saturday morning drive.
Recommended free event of the weekend: Southcentral Pennsylvania Genealogical Society, 2:15 p.m., Sunday. Richard Konkel will present on “French Huguenots in York County, Pa.”
Recommended blog post of the day: Melissa Nann Burke’s Belief and Beyond post: Top religion stories of 2009.
Recommended forum of the day: The Exchange: York County Amusement Parks, York has had numerous amusement parks – why not a new one?

About Jim McClure

Editor of the York Daily Record/Sunday News, ydr.com and its many digital products. East Region Editor, Digital First Media. Journalism/history blogger: yorktownsquare.com. Author or co-author of seven York County, Pa., history books.
This entry was posted in Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, Famous York visitors, Farms & fields, Genealogy/research, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Made in York, Mail bag, School days, Small-town life, Unsung/obscure sites. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to ‘Goin’ up t’ Muddy Creek, goin’ on the run': Linked in with neat York County, Pa., history stuff – Jan. 2, 2010

  1. Jackie says:

    Where can I get a print of the picture of Santa going up the fire truck ladder to the third floor of the old Bon-Ton? Thanks.

  2. Jim McClure says:

    Jackie,
    That’s not immediately clear. That originally came from a Bon-Ton anniversary book from the late 1990s, and I used it in my “Never to be Forgotten” book, with permission. Now, the photo might be in the hands of the York County Heritage Trust, http://www.yorkheritage.org. Or you could query Bon-Ton. That’s about the best I can tell you.
    Jim

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