Walking on oyster shells – Linked in with neat York County history stuff – Feb. 1, 2011

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Oysters were used for more than eating in 19th-century York County, Pa., although they were a popular delicacy at that. Their shells were used to surface driveways, such as this one leading to the Grantley mansion in the hills south of York. York, Pa., Daily Record/Sunday News photographer and Yorkblogger Bil Bowden came across this postcard view and the one below, courtesy of Bill Snyder of York. Speaking of Bil, here are other links of interest involving photos Bil captured: Simple photograph helps frame York, Pa.’s, future and York County’s Wildcat Falls former peaceful Susquehanna River picnic venue and Precarious perch atop a smokestack.
Neat stuff from all over … .
Zimmerman Center, the former Dritt Mansion, houses Susquehanna Gateway Heritage Area.
Contact information for a bookstore operating out of the center is available via the promotional agency’s website: http://www.susquehannaheritage.org/.
Here’s a sampling of items available: … .


1. Lower Susquehanna Water Trail Map and Guide – $15 also available online
2. Visions of the Susquehanna Exhibition Catalog – $25 – features paintings from the original traveling exhibit and including the pieces in our permanent collection at the Zimmerman Center.
3. Mason-Dixon Trail maps- $15.95 – set of detailed maps covering the entire 192-mile trail
4. The Trailblazer – $5 – Guide for the York County Heritage Rail Trail – perfect for your favorite cyclist, runner, or trail enthusiast
5. Columbia, Marietta and Wrightsville – $21.99 – by Frederic Abendschein. Historic photographs and history of Susquehanna River towns.
Guided tours: On the first Friday of each month from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Susquehanna Gateway offers guided tours of the Zimmerman Center. Tours are also available by appointment during normal office hours.
Kuhn coverage: To learn more about an athlete who is quickly becoming one of York County’s most accomplished in history, you can view most York Daily Record/Sunday News coverage here.
Recommended blog post of the day: Cannonball’s Scott Mingus, a tireless researcher, shares some Civil War leads: Pennsylvania State Archives a treasure trove of Civil War material.
Forum of the day: Exchangers are discussing York County’s varied architecture.
Also of interest on yorktownsquare.com:
How about a little hog maw with your oyster stew?
Mix ‘You know you’re a Yorker, if’ with oysters. You get…
‘The oysters have been very, very popular’
Oysters: ‘Economical … not bones or waste …’
Archives:
All York Town Square posts from the start. Then use “find” function on browser to search for keywords.

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Now demolished, King’s Mill dam impounded the Codorus Creek in the vicinity of the old Smurfit-Stone mill, now owned by York College. See this aerial photo of that old mill.

About Jim McClure

Editor of the York Daily Record/Sunday News, ydr.com and its many digital products. East Region Editor, Digital First Media. Journalism/history blogger: yorktownsquare.com. Author or co-author of seven York County, Pa., history books.
This entry was posted in Archives, all posts, For photo fans, Genealogy/research, Linked in/neat stuff, Mail bag, Nostalgia & memories, People. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Walking on oyster shells – Linked in with neat York County history stuff – Feb. 1, 2011

  1. Am I correct that they used polished oyster shells on reverse painted glass paintings? I have one such painting of the Statue of Liberty that was passed on to me from my grandfather’s estate. There are some shiny spots on the painting that I have been told were polished oyster shells.

  2. Mark Arbogast says:

    The article mentions the Grantley mansion in the hills south of York. Does anyone know where the Grantley mansion was and if it’s still standing?

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