Walking on oyster shells in York County, Pa. – Linked in with neat history stuff – Feb. 1, 2011

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Oysters were used for more than eating in 19th-century York County, Pa., although they were a popular delicacy at that. Their shells were used to surface driveways, such as this one leading to the Grantley mansion in the hills south of York. York, Pa., Daily Record/Sunday News photographer Bil Bowden came across this postcard view and the one below, courtesy of Bill Snyder of York. Bil Bowden photos: Simple photograph helps frame York, Pa.’s, future and York County’s Wildcat Falls former peaceful Susquehanna River picnic venue and Precarious perch atop a smokestack.

Neat stuff from all over … .
Zimmerman Center, the former Dritt Mansion, houses Susquehanna Gateway Heritage Area.
Contact information for a bookstore operating out of the center is available via the promotional agency’s website: http://www.susquehannaheritage.org/.
Here’s a sampling of items available: … .


1. Lower Susquehanna Water Trail Map and Guide – $15 also available online
2. Visions of the Susquehanna Exhibition Catalog – $25 – features paintings from the original traveling exhibit and including the pieces in our permanent collection at the Zimmerman Center.
3. Mason-Dixon Trail maps- $15.95 – set of detailed maps covering the entire 192-mile trail
4. The Trailblazer – $5 – Guide for the York County Heritage Rail Trail – perfect for your favorite cyclist, runner, or trail enthusiast
5. Columbia, Marietta and Wrightsville – $21.99 – by Frederic Abendschein. Historic photographs and history of Susquehanna River towns.
Guided tours: On the first Friday of each month from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Susquehanna Gateway offers guided tours of the Zimmerman Center. Tours are also available by appointment during normal office hours.
Kuhn coverage: To learn more about an athlete who is quickly becoming one of York County’s most accomplished in history, you can view most York Daily Record/Sunday News coverage here.
Recommended blog post of the day: Cannonball’s Scott Mingus, a tireless researcher, shares some Civil War leads: Pennsylvania State Archives a treasure trove of Civil War material.
Forum of the day: Exchangers are discussing York County’s varied architecture.
Also of interest on yorktownsquare.com:
How about a little hog maw with your oyster stew?
Mix ‘You know you’re a Yorker, if’ with oysters. You get…
‘The oysters have been very, very popular’
Oysters: ‘Economical … not bones or waste …’
Archives:
All York Town Square posts from the start. Then use “find” function on browser to search for keywords.

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Now demolished, King’s Mill dam impounded the Codorus Creek in the vicinity of the old Smurfit-Stone mill, now owned by York College. See this aerial photo of that old mill.

About Jim McClure

Editor of the York Daily Record/Sunday News, ydr.com and its many digital products. East Region Editor, Digital First Media. Journalism/history blogger: yorktownsquare.com. Author or co-author of seven York County, Pa., history books.
This entry was posted in Archives, all posts, For photo fans, Genealogy/research, Linked in/neat stuff, Mail bag, Nostalgia & memories, People, YorkEats: Hogmaw & such and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Walking on oyster shells in York County, Pa. – Linked in with neat history stuff – Feb. 1, 2011

  1. Am I correct that they used polished oyster shells on reverse painted glass paintings? I have one such painting of the Statue of Liberty that was passed on to me from my grandfather’s estate. There are some shiny spots on the painting that I have been told were polished oyster shells.

  2. Mark Arbogast says:

    The article mentions the Grantley mansion in the hills south of York. Does anyone know where the Grantley mansion was and if it’s still standing?

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