Roadside Giant – Route 30′s largest billboard: Linked in with neat York County history stuff – July 30, 2011

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“Visitors say they find Turkey Hill Experience a sweet stop,” the York, Pa., Daily Record/Sunday News headline read. It appeared over a story about the new Turkey Hill dairy museum, across the Susquehanna River in Lancaster County’s Columbia. Motorists along Route 30 cannot miss the museum interpreting an agri-business in a renovated red-brick factory building – the former Ashley & Bailey Silk Mill. The water tower on the site is becoming a tall sign, as the Turkey Hill logo is appearing on it. (Not seen here.) Here’s what another newspaper story says about that big billboard: “The logo is 180 feet tall and 288 feet wide. Installation is expected to be completed by the end of the week, and once in place, the sign will be visible from both sides of the Susquehanna River.” (See additional photo below.) Also of interest: Turkey Point wind turbine power enough to make 6 million gallons of ice cream annually and For decades, York countians have worked to harness windpower and York factory’s lines ranged from Moneybak black silk to boys pajamas.
Neat stuff from all over … .
Bill Rouse is 67 years old and has lived in Violet Hill all his life.
He wanted it to be known that the Shady Dell was not the only teen hangout in that Spring Garden Township hamlet.
“There was another named “THE HUT,” he emailed.
The building is still there in Hildebrand Alley… .


It was smaller than the Dell but was crowded on weekends.
“Dick Golden and his wife were the owner and operators,” he wrote.
Bill attended the Shady Dell auction many months ago.
“I wonder how many people have one of the collectable cups that they had for sale that day,” he wrote. “They were white with blue lettering.”
Pros from York County: Several former York County athletes have shots at NFL teams this summer and fall: Dallastown grad Kyle O’Donnell signs contract with Washington Redskins and Red Land’s Cox joins childhood friends, signed by Atlanta Falcons and Ex-Bearcat Hunter chasing down his NFL dream. Who knows? Maybe one of these guys will join the full lineup of pro sports stars with York County roots.

Blog post of the day:
Don’t miss: YAIAA football to Civil War events to free Hershey Theatre and concert tickets to food allergies and whoopie pies

Forum of the day:
What became of the former Majestic Restaurant in York? Exchangers are discussing.
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The entrance to the Turkey Hill museum in Columbia gives a view of the logo that will make the site’s water tower a tall sign. Here are some facts about the Turkey Hill Experience, according to a York Daily Record/Sunday News story: “Open since June 4, the Turkey Hill Experience features over 20,000 square feet of interactive exhibits that share with visitors the process of making ice cream and iced tea, the history of Turkey Hill Dairy, the nation’s fourth best selling ice cream and number one selling refrigerated iced tea brand in the nation, and the dairy culture in the mid-Atlantic region.”
Archives

- All York Town Square posts from the start. Then use “find” function on browser to search for keywords.
- Of course, you can always search for York Town Square posts on Google. For example, when you search for yorktownsquare and the Shady Dell, you get this.
*Photos courtesy York Daily Record/Sunday News.

About Jim McClure

Editor of the York Daily Record/Sunday News, ydr.com and its many digital products. East Region Editor, Digital First Media. Journalism/history blogger: yorktownsquare.com. Author or co-author of seven York County, Pa., history books.
This entry was posted in Archives, all posts, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Made in York, Mail bag, Nostalgia & memories, People, York celebrities, York Revs/pros, York sports. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Roadside Giant – Route 30′s largest billboard: Linked in with neat York County history stuff – July 30, 2011

  1. Jo says:

    Jim: Was that water tower always there or built for the T. H. exhibit? Is it for real or just as a “billboard?”

  2. Jim McClure says:

    I’m sure it was part of the factory complex, and that is supported by the story that calls it “iconic.” Water towers were standard issue for factories that size in their day. Maybe someone out there knows for sure?
    Jim

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