Missourian interested in the Emig Mansion, that engaging Emigsville landmark


The Emig Mansion is, yes, in Emigsville, one of those York County, Pa., landmarks that make you think: I wish I could see its inside. Here’s one interior photo and check out others at Emigsville.org. Or you can actually stay there; it’s a bed and breakfast. (See photograph of its exterior below.) Also of interest: Transportation-oriented Emigsville a walkable York-area community with lots of community.

Vickey Batschelett lives in Missouri.

But she’s fascinated by York County, particularly Emigsville and specifically the Emig family and the family home, the landmark Emig Mansion.

She emailed:

“My fourth great grandparents are Johann Lorenz Cramer/Cromer/Kramer/ Craumer (1732-1805 approx) and Anna Maria Emig (1738-1800). Anna Maria’s parents being John Philip Emig Sr. (1699-1794) and Anna Maria Hahn (1705-1762). These are the emigrants to York County, Pa. with John Phillip Emig Sr. being the first parent of the Emig family in York County in my family tree.

“I do not know if there were other Emigs who came before or during his early years here. To the best of my knowledge he was the original emigrant. I also do not know as of yet if there is any connection to Emigsville and its history, but I am needing to add it to Anna Maria’s Ancestry page if there is a story to be told.”

I wrote her back with the recommendation that she check out the community website, emigsville.org.

She emailed back pointing to National Register of Historic Places narrative about the mansion, particularly:  “the plot of land on which the Emig home stands originally came into the Emig family in 1802, when Valentine Emig purchased a 191 acre farm in Manchester township. This farm passed into the hands of Valentine’s son John in 1806 and into those of John’s son John Jr. for whom the village of Emigsville was named in 1840. The wagon work’s Emigs or descendants of Valentine built the house in 1850 and it has been added to up until the turn of the century.”

She would like information on the Emig family and particularly this link:

“Thus far I have not found the lineage connection between Valentine and my Johann Philip Emig Sr. and Jr. though I feel very certain they are all related. I think now I would have to go back into Germany to find their common connection and I am not ready to work on this line to that extent at this time.”

If you can help Vickey with anything Emig, contact her:  v_batschelett123@yahoo.com or comment below.

Meanwhile, we appreciate her bringing the Emig Mansion into our view, a landmark that does, indeed, fascinate. I’ve been inside the mansion – that was even before current owner Shary Smith made improvements. It was magnificent.

Any stories about the mansion? Comment below.

 Also of interest:

For information about one of the family’s businesses, the Acme Wagon Works, check this out: Emigsville, Pa., American Acme documents found in St. Louis, Mo.

 

A Chamber of Commerce ribbon-cutting outside the mansion in 2005. (Click for a larger view.)

 

About Jim McClure

Editor of the York Daily Record/Sunday News, ydr.com and its many digital products. East Region Editor, Digital First Media. Journalism/history blogger: yorktownsquare.com. Author or co-author of seven York County, Pa., history books.
This entry was posted in Archives, all posts, For photo fans, Genealogy/research, Local landmarks, Longtime York families, Mail bag, Small-town life, Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Missourian interested in the Emig Mansion, that engaging Emigsville landmark

  1. Terrence Downs says:

    Also am curious of any bloggers who know of “Risheleu” (sp), which was just beyond the top crest of Woodland View Drive. I actually have a York map that identifies it – and my godfather was a Rishel who, his (great) Uncle Henry was owner of that farmstead. Ironically Jim Rishel’s farm is where Hayshire is presently located. I also understand Hayshire is pronounced HAY-sheer, according to George Hay Kain III, whose father bought the land in mid 1950′s – creating the suburban Hayshire development beyond White Oak Park.

  2. Dianne says:

    Rishelieu was the property of Norman E. Rishel, brother of Henry Rishel. Norman began developing his 99 acre farm in the 1960′s.

  3. shary smith says:

    There are pictures of the inside of the mansion on my website. The mansion is currently for sale and it would be wonderful if a relative of Emig could buy it and it go back into the family. This house is a treasure and needs to be preserved.

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