Ma & Pa’s old Ore Valley train station coming down

Take one last look at the former Ore Valley Station on the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad, courtesy of Gary Heiland. The York Township station was scheduled to come down today. (See additional photos below.) Also of interest: Trestles, tunnels, swimming pools: Bringing together a rich assortment of Ma & Pa Railroad memories.

Old train stations along York County railroads often come down with little fanfare. Many have been turned into private residences and their original purpose forgotten.

But the pending demolition of the former Ore Valley train station, near Springwood Road and Camp Betty Washington Roads, caught the attention of rail fans. It was supposed to come down at 9 a.m. today. (Update: A photographer at the scene said word there was that it will not come down today. Update to update: It’s coming down. See photos below.)

York countian Gary Heiland sent in these photographs this week (coming from several sources), giving one last look at the old station.


The Ma & Pa was a 77-mile rail line that linked Baltimore and York. It snaked along Maryland and York County waterways, serving farms and agribusinesses along the way.

It was generally second fiddle to the more direct Northern Central Railway, now better known as the York County Heritage Rail Trail.

The owner of the Ore Valley building, long a private residence, looked into rehabilitation, but the cost was too high, according to a ydr.com story.

Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad Preservation Society President Jerry McCloskey said about 60 stations sat near the railroad. About 15 remain standing today.


The York Daily Record/Sunday News and ydr.com is covering the demolition today and will provide another set of photographs of its demise.

 

For other post about the Ore Valley area, check out: York Township.


Old nails in a telegraph pole near the station. One of the party that took this photo wrote that he didn’t have the right tool to remove them; he would have otherwise pulled the head off the nails.

And now, how the station looked at 1 p.m. today, courtesy the York Daily Record:

About Jim McClure

Editor of the York Daily Record/Sunday News, ydr.com and its many digital products. East Region Editor, Digital First Media. Journalism/history blogger: yorktownsquare.com. Author or co-author of seven York County, Pa., history books.
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5 Responses to Ma & Pa’s old Ore Valley train station coming down

  1. Stephen H. Smith says:

    The photo from the trackside of Ma & Pa’s old Ore Valley train station brought back a memory that I regret to this day. Seeing that photo reinforced my recall of that long stonewall leading into the Ore Valley train station and wishing I had brought along a camera to capture such a wonderful picture. My recall is from a 1965 passenger train excursion on 7-miles of the Ma & Pa tracks between York and Yoe. A massive Canadian Pacific steam locomotive pulled this excursion train. This steam engine was much to heavy for trestles further to the south, therefore Yoe Station was the stop at the end of the line prior to returning to York. During 1966 and 1967, a smaller steam locomotive was utilized that allowed Ma & Pa Steam Train excursions to run all the way on the 33-miles of track between York and Delta. In 1968, I purchased my first 35-mm camera; looking forward to finally being able to take photos during one of these steam train excursions on the Ma & Pa. Just my luck, steam train excursions were canceled in 1968; never to be run again.

  2. Mike Wolford says:

    What is to become of the property now? Why didn’t the owner try to raise money to rehab the property? Why did he not turn to the media for help? Did the township force the demolition? I often thought of the house as I used to rent a property close by. I thought it could be a really nice house restored. I didn’t even know the historic significance until I read this article. It is really disappointing.

    • Jim McClure says:

      Mike, I understand that it would have been cost-prohibitive to rehab. Btw, my understanding that a solitary telegraph pole, seen in one of the photos in this post, stands. I have to get over to that yet-undeveloped site to check it out./Jim

  3. Liz says:

    I used to go by the station everyday going to school for 13 years (K-12). I always wondered what it was and now I know. I was very sad to see it be demolished. After graduating I used to drive by it everyday to work.

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