Wrightsville’s Burning of the Bridge diorama tells story of adventure, history: Linked in to York County history, Sept. 28, 2012

The often-overlooked Burning of the Bridge diorama does an effective job of explaining the Civil War Battle of Wrightsville and the subsequent burning of the Susquehanna River bridge connecting Wrightsville and Columbia in late-June 1863. It’s located in a former post office at 124 Hellam Street and is open from 1-4 p.m. Sundays until Oct. 28. After that visit, stop by the Historic Wrightsville Museum. (See another photo of a reenactment of sorts of the burning of the bridge below.) Also of interest: Battle of Wrightsville – Rare photograph of the battlefield

Much has been written about the bold move by a Hanover businessman to purchase the old Electric Map familiar to generations of visitors to Gettysburg.

Scott Roland plans to display the map as an attraction in Hanover, where it will appear with another exhibit showing the Battle of Hanover.

That’s a wonderful project on the eve of the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. It’s sure to draw people to Hanover, site of an often-overlooked cavalry clash that resulted in 300 dead, wounded and missing military men in blue and gray.

It gives an opportunity to remember another map or diorama explaining the other major battle on York County soil — the Battle of Wrightsville.

Along the old Lincoln Highway in Wrightsville sits a small building, a former post office.
Today, it houses Historic Wrightsville’s Burning of the Bridge diorama.

The exhibit, complete with sound and light show, does an effective job interpreting the Battle of 
Wrightsville and the subsequent burning of the covered bridge that stopped the Confederate advance possibly to Harrisburg and Philadelphia.

“The story told by the narration is one of adventure and history,” a description of the diorama at historicwrightsvillepa.org states.

Well said.


If the diorama in Wrightsville models the overall battle, ‘Bridge Burner’ volunteer Chuck Storm lights firewood on one of the old bridge supports in the Susquehanna River in a past reenactment of the burning of the covered bridge. That support actually held the bridge that was burned in 1863 to stop the Confederate advance.

Other neat stuff from all over … .

Challenged intersection: Something that came across in the reporting on the now-demolished Rocky Ridge Motel. The Glen Rock exit off of Interstate 83, site of the old motel, is known as a “failing intersection”, meaning its late 1950s-vintage ramps and exits don’t meet the modern standards of an interstate.

A bike brand: This weekend is Bike Night, Harley’s open house and the White Rose Thunder event at the York Expo Center. These events surely reinforce the connection of York with two-wheel motorized bikes. Background: Check out these photos and stories about Harley-Davidson in York and Harley’s new plant tour – From frame to ‘final dress’

Blog post of the day:
Yorkblogger June Lloyd writes about the just-released Journal of York County Heritage, a publication of the York County Heritage Trust.

Forum of the day: An Exchanger is reflecting on York’s newstands, past and present. Join in the conversation.

About Jim McClure

Editor of the York Daily Record/Sunday News, ydr.com and its many digital products. East Region Editor, Digital First Media. Journalism/history blogger: yorktownsquare.com. Author or co-author of seven York County, Pa., history books.
This entry was posted in Archives, all posts, Civil War, Events, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Nostalgia & memories, Uncategorized, Unsung/obscure sites, War and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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