Hex Murder witchcraft trials … ‘and they happened in York County’: Linked in to York County, Pa., history, 3/27/13

Red Lion Controls not in Red Lion, Pa.?/Steam into History

It will be an interesting night in Glen Rock, Pa., when J. Ross McGinnis takes the podium in April to talk about the Hex Murder of 1928. McGinnis is an attorney with a gift for spinning a tale – only a true, terrible tale in this case. He will tell how three young assailants attacked suspected witch Nelson Rehmeyer to break a spell in a remote hollow not far from Glen Rock. ‘These “Witchcraft” trials were the first “Witchcraft” trials on this continent in over 200 years, and they happened in York County,’ a news release from sponsor Glen Rock Historic Preservation Society said. The poster gives the details for this free presentation. Also of interest: Check out these photos and stories about the Hex Murder case and Later in life, Hex murder assailant a genuinely nice guy and good employee and see more Hex links below.

Neat stuff from all over … .

I like this lead about 40-year-old Red Lion Controls, as found on ydr.com:

“It’s not in Red Lion.

“It’s never been in Red Lion.

“And if you questioned its founder, Harry Cordes, he’d happily share the reasons behind the name of the company he started out of his basement and one-car garage in Dallastown in 1972.

“Everybody who asked got a different answer,” said Mike Granby, president of Red Lion Controls. “The company moved to its current location on Willow Springs Circle in Manchester Township in 1978.”

In today’s business climate, reaching 40 years is quite an achievement for a company.

Flagging all flagmen
: Steam into History is looking for flagmen to said the excursion service when it begins its New Freedom to Hanover Junction runs this summer.

Neat story: Lancasteronline.com posted an interesting story – Saving places not just buildings – about preservation across the river. That’s, of course, a hot topic on this side of the river, as well, as the ‘Remember When’ item below attests. The story also has links to the 10 oldest sites in Lancaster County and a map of historic sites in Pennsylvania.

Remember when? The Avalong Barn came down this week, not gaining a second life as did the barn in this 1960s then & now photograph. San Carlos was operating then – as now – in a converted barn. But here’s the question: Do you remember when Loucks Road – later Route 30 – was a two-lane road, as it is in this photograph? Please comment below.


‘Creativity Unleashed,’ a brand associated with York, has never been better illustrated than in this story of a craftman/artist who makes art out of junk: Local artist Patrick Sells creates work from discarded materials.

Hex Murder – also of interest:

Click on these individual links with their extensive collection of Hex Murder photographs: Powwowing: ‘… It was here, and it had many adherents … , ‘Powwowing was done for good’, Hex headache cure: ‘Tame thou flesh and bone’, Relative: Evil in Hex murder came from outside, Hex murder fascinating tale of mysticism, occult: Part 1, ‘Trials of Hex’ makes sense of notorious murder case: Part 2 , Little-known facts about Hex murder trial emerge, Hex murder compared to O.J.’s, Anna Nicole Smith’s cases, Hex house visit offers surprises, Visiting the scene of the crime.

About Jim McClure

Editor of the York Daily Record/Sunday News, ydr.com and its many digital products. East Region Editor, Digital First Media. Journalism/history blogger: yorktownsquare.com. Author or co-author of seven York County, Pa., history books.
This entry was posted in Archives, all posts, Cops & courts, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Hex murder, History video channel, Linked in/neat stuff, Local landmarks, Made in York, Mail bag, Nostalgia & memories, People, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Hex Murder witchcraft trials … ‘and they happened in York County’: Linked in to York County, Pa., history, 3/27/13

  1. Jim … I definitely remember traveling over the two-lane Loucks Road bridge spanning the Codorus Creek in the mid-60s; I did so every day on the school bus trip to and from Central High School. The two-lane bridge shown in your photo was built in 1948; it replaced a one-way bridge! The York Sunday News reported in 1948, “A one-way bridge on a heavily-traveled highway is bound to be a safety menace, particularly when the approaches are crooked. Although the bridge officially has an 8-ton limit, trucks twice that weight traveled over the structure. The bridge shivers and shakes like ‘Shiverin Liz’, but somehow, despite her age, she hasn’t fallen in the Codorus yet.” Up till 1948 the main east-west road ran north of the San Carlo’s barn; after 1948 the main-east-west road runs south of the barn. That change happened only 65 years ago; some of your readers must remember driving over the “Shiverin Liz” wrought-iron bridge. A 1948 aerial view of the 1884 “Shiverin Liz” bridge and the 1948 bridge under construction is in this post: http://www.yorkblog.com/yorkspast/2012/12/02/a-road-named-n-o-p-arsenal-and-whiteford-part-4-new-1948-n-o-p-route-cuts-traffic-hazards/

  2. Pingback: Buffy's World | Don’t miss: York County hex trial to ghost signs to map of where missionaries are serving

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