How one spot in York County, Pa., says a lot about what is going on around here, Part 5

bus_jp-cvs-2This nondescript former gas station – it’s really ‘former’ now that it has been demolished – points to a story about change in York County, Pa. Also of interest: How one spot in York County tells much about what is going on around there, 4.

The old filling station stood on the northwest corner of George and Loucks Road (Route 30) for years, decades.

That was no doubt an easy stop for motorists in its day. It was right there for those traveling the major roads that cross there. Not far for motorists with that flavor of credit card exiting Interstate 83.

Then the three decades saw the growth of convenience stores. And the quick lube places. Those filling stations couldn’t match the convenience – so sought after by increasingly busy motorists. Not to mention the prices.

At some point, the George & Loucks service station closed, and a T-Mobile store moved in.

Whatever the communications giant’s marketing message promoted by Charles Barkley, Catherine Zeta-Jones and others, I always thought of the small cellphone store in relation to its inability to fill its oversized parking lot. I mean, nothing in that building nowadays could draw enough traffic to fill that big blacktopped space.

But as it turns out, a cellphone store didn’t need that prominent crossroads site. So then came another strategy to cover all that blacktop: Build a bigger structure, a CVS pharmacy, for example.

Such prominence for CVS – now in a shopping center across the street – is key because chain pharmacies are popping up everywhere.

Those motorists who stopped and said, “Fill ‘er up”?

They’re aging, and the leaders at the pharmacy parent company know a growing market when they see it. An aging population needs its meds.

One thing about all this is that demolition of another nearby service station might have served the community even better.

Farther east on Loucks, an old Exxon station greets motorists coming off the Interstate 83 ramp on their way west.

In its day, it greeted gas-hungry motorists first thing. Now, it gives a rusty, worn-out first impression to motorists coming off the ramp.

Not all buildings can be saved, or should be. Here are two that deserved or deserve to come down.

But as everyday as these buildings were – or are – they say a lot about what is going on around here.

Also of interest:

For more, check out the YDR story: Demolition begins in Manchester Township … .

Also:

Part I: ‘How one spot in York County, Pa., tells much about what is going on around there’ and Part II: ‘How one spot in York County, Pa. …’ and Part III: How one spot in York County, Pa.

bus2_jp-cvs-1_500The former George & Loucks gas station is no more. Perhaps a similar fate awaits a cousin station farther east.

About Jim McClure

Editor of the York Daily Record/Sunday News, ydr.com and its many digital products. East Region Editor, Digital First Media. Journalism/history blogger: yorktownsquare.com. Author or co-author of seven York County, Pa., history books.
This entry was posted in Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Nostalgia & memories, Small-town life, Unsung/obscure sites, Wheels of York and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to How one spot in York County, Pa., says a lot about what is going on around here, Part 5

  1. Terrence Downs says:

    Somewhere I’ve seen a photo – birds eye or taken from the bluff overlooking at the Lebanon Cemetary in North York of this intersection c. 1940′s – when Dauber’s Nurseries was on the opposing corner where the Hardee’s stands today. Huber’s Tire building yet stands, now occupied by Brad Wilt’s North York Auto Menders. Worth a search!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>