York’s and Harrisburg’s nightlife stories intersect and run parallel

Linked in/Neat stuff: Civil War hero John Henry Denig’s bridge/Gold panning in York County
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Harrisburg, Pennsylvania’s capital city, is busy at night in this scene. York’s recent downtown story intersects and parallels with Harrisburg’s. About a decade ago, York was betting on nightclubs to spawn rebirth to replace loss of retail and other initiatives. That had worked in Harrisburg, and York’s leaders hoped for similar results. Well, nightclubs didn’t work in York, and actually, the nightclub phase has moved through Harrisburg, too, as this FlipSidePa.com story indicates. Now it’s a place for eateries, music and casual stuff. ‘It has become more attractive now for date night — young professionals going out for an evening for drinks and entertainment. We’re seeing more emphasis on the dining experiences and the variety of experiences that you can have along Second Street still fun, still great nightlife but not every other door is a nightclub,’ a visitors bureau official told FlipSide. You’re seeing some of that in York, too.  It’s interesting to track changes in a downtown, and it might make sense to keep an eye on Harrisburg’s transition. York seems to be following the same path. Also of interest:  Emailer links Roosevelt Avenue Airport, Downtown York Bon-Ton – and Santa.

Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

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New way of seeing York, Pa., Part 2: Rail trail opens up new vistas of city

Linked in/Neat stuff: Emig Mansion open house/Historians tour old bank building
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York, Pa., Daily Record photographer Paul Kuehnel wrote this view from the York County Heritage Rail Trail, north of York city (seen in background): ‘Moon, old willow, over the Codorus. Nice late evening bike ride. Beat the heat, squeeze in the light.’  This type of view helps place York, Pa., on nationally distributed lists. Just this week, the city earned a spot of this list:  Top 10 most heart-warmingly beautiful small Pa. towns. Also of interest: New way of seeing York, Pa., Part I: Rail trail opens up new vistas of city.

Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

YorkTownSquare readers have told us that you enjoy a heads up when a historic site holds an open house.

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Renovating Abbottstown’s Peter Ickes House: Log construction discovery was a ‘thrilling experience’

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James Fritz is a researcher and writer of history. And he lives in a historic setting – a 1700s house near the square in Adams County’s Abbottstown, just over the York County line. ‘My new two-story log and stone home was located near the town square and the stone half of the dwelling had all the hallmarks of an early structure of Pennsylvania German/Swiss heritage,’ he writes. Also of interest: Lincoln Highway Communities: ‘I know I’ll be back.’

James Fritz is guest blogger on York Town Square today:

Continue reading “Renovating Abbottstown’s Peter Ickes House: Log construction discovery was a ‘thrilling experience’” »

Posted in All politics is local, American Revolution, Antiquing & artifacts, Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local landmarks, Longtime York families, Small-town life, Unsung/obscure sites, War | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

These big mysterious, metal, mechanical machines went out of style in York County, Pa., a decade ago

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This might seem like an easy History Mystery quiz, but it’s been about 10 years since these big metal boxes were taken out of service in York County, Pa. Time passes fast.  They were sold in 2006 after their electronic replacements successfully operated earlier that year.  So a partial generation of folks never had the opportunity to use these mechanical machines. OK, what are these? Do you miss them? Answer. Also of interest: Check out these past History Mystery quizzes and (fun) tests.

Take these 6 History Mystery quizzes, and see how you do! (Click on the date if the photo does not appear on your mobile device).

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5 things to know about Red Lion’s grand Fairmount Park

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This is the view across Red Lion’s Fairmount Park. That’s the community war memorial (see below) seen prominently in the photo. And there’s a playground in the background, right. A water park can be seen in background, left. The popular water park attracts scores of visitors to the park. The nearby, popular Kaltreider-Benfer Library stands near the park. Also of interest: Red Lion’s towering Fairmount Park off the beaten track.

It’s been 35 years since the publication of the anniversary book ‘Red Lion: The First Hundred Years.’

But it’s still an interesting look at a then-changing community that has continued to evolve.

Fairmount Park has enjoyed some of that change with a water park going in a couple of years ago and an attractive playground for kids. (Red Lion’s downtown undergoing a rebirth, as well.)

So through we’ll look at Red Lion through the prism of Fairmount Park.

Here goes, courtesy of the 1980 century anniversary book: Did you know these 5 things about Fairmount? Continue reading “5 things to know about Red Lion’s grand Fairmount Park” »

Posted in All politics is local, Archives, all posts, Books & reading, Events, Explanations/controversy, Farms, fields & mills, For photo fans, Local landmarks, Longtime York families, Unsung/obscure sites, War, Women's history, World War I, World War II | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Original Yorkblog.com history writer now doing ‘something completely different’ a decade later

Also below: See photo of Saginaw’s Meadowbrook Pool, from Joan Concilio’s Only in York County blog
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Yorkblogger June Lloyd writes about a lot of interesting things in York County’s past. A specialty is to keep readers informed worldwide about Camp Security, York County’s British POW camp in the American Revolution. In a recent post, Prehistoric and other finds at Camp Security, she shows and tells about recent finds in the summer dig in the quest to find the stockade at the Springettsbury Township site. June Lloyd is one of the original Yorkblog.com history writers. Also of interest: The 4 Yorkbloggers still writing about history. But make that 5.

“And Now for Something Completely Different,” the subject line on Scott Butcher’s email stated.

I have enjoyed exchanging emails with Scott, an architectural historian and an executive with York’s JDB Engineering Inc., for over the past decade.

But that got my attention.

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Downtown Hanover, Pa.: Here’s how a bird viewed ‘McAllistertown’s’ square 60 years ago

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: More support for WWII hero recognition/New museum in Quecreek

An aerial view of Hanover's Center Sqaure from the 1950's.  Courtesy Hanover Area Historical Society This bird’s-eye view shows Hanover’s Center Square in the 1950s. The equestrian statue – the Picket – stood in the middle of the square in those days. It has since been moved to one of the corners. The borough’s 200th anniversary of its incorporation comes this year. Hanover officials hosted a major celebration of the 250th birthday of the Hanover in 2013. Here’s a brief story of the town’s founding in 1763, from my ‘Never to be Forgotten': ‘Innkeeper Richard McAllister lays out future Hanover in lowlands at the junction of busy trade roads. The area previously was part of Digges Choice. According to one account, McAllister names the town Hanover to gain favor from the many people of German descent who populate that area. Much later, Hanover adopted a municipal flag bearing the colors of blue, the color of the state flag; white, for York, the White Rose City; and gold, prominent in the heraldry of the House of Hannover, Germany. Many people, including a visiting George Washington, called the town McAllistertown. As a crossroads community, Hanover played host to many prominent citizens including Benjamin Franklin, Martha Washington and Gen. “Mad Anthony” Wayne.’ For other photos of old Hanover, courtesy the Hanover Area Historical Society, check out this Evening Sun Media Center gallery. Also of interest: This iconic Evening Sun photograph shows Hanover’s square at ground level.

Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

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Posted in Archives, all posts, Art & artists, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Lorann Jacobs, Murals of York, Unsung/obscure sites, World War II, York County aerial photos | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

This snowy Hanover square photo will bring cool relief in these hot days

Linked in/Neat stuff: Hex Hollow movie/Locate this little red schoolhouse?
Shoveling out from a blizzard in front of the Central Hotel in Hanover's Center Square in 1890.  Courtesy of Hanover Area Historical Society
This view of the aftermath of a blizzard in Hanover’s Center Square in 1890 will give some cool relief in these hot days of summer. The town, then observing 75 years as a borough, has come upon another anniversary this year – its 200th. Check out this Evening Sun in Hanover photo gallery showing views of the town of old.  (And view this Hanover photo below.) Also of interest: Hanover ranks as York County’s oldest borough.
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York County filled with diverse museums with their slate clocks, slate boards, prison bars and old cabooses

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Delta’s Old Line Museum displays artifacts that tell about this southeastern York County, Pa.’s, diverse history – from Welsh slate mining to Ma & Pa Railroad history. Its inside prize is the slate clock – the Humphrey Pritchard clock. Its outdoors exhibit stands a couple of miles away – cottages in the Welsh mining village of  Coulsontown. Also of interest: Unusual artifacts in area museums, hog troughs and such.

York countians love their history, and many communities host museum to help tell stories about the past.

Here is a sampling of four among many such community treasures (and here’s a list of all the historical societies and museums around here) … .

Continue reading “York County filled with diverse museums with their slate clocks, slate boards, prison bars and old cabooses” »

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Obscure York, Pa., building served as nationally known artist J. Horace Rudy’s studio

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Jeff Koons, the baseball player/Summer night in Wrightsville
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Noted York County, Pa., artist J. Horace Rudy operated his art studio at 601 North Hartley Street in the first third of the 20th century. Charlie Bacas, a longtime resident of The Avenues, emailed this photo noting a vestige of Rudy’s time there – the leaded glass extension. Rudy specialized in works with glass, and his stained glass legacy appears in churches and homes around York County and  beyond. This obscure building serves as another example of a now-obscure building or house around the county in which a man or a woman of accomplishment did great things. Such a home deserves a marker, such as is happening in Glen Rock: Parade Music Prince Roland F. Seitz. (See a close up of 601 North Harley below.) Also of interest: So who was J. Horace Rudy?

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Posted in Antiquing & artifacts, Archives, all posts, Art & artists, Explanations/controversy, Famous York visitors, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Nostalgia & memories, Unsung/obscure sites, Wheels of York | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment