York Fair 250: Civil War’s Worth Infantry band one of many entertainers to play at the fair

The Worth Infantry, 1888Photo courtesy of the York Fair

The Worth Infantry , a York County, Pa., unit captained by John Hay, was an early responder after the Confederate firing on Fort Sumter in 1861. Scott Mingus writes in his Cannonball blog that the unit was formed before the Civil War. This photo, from the files of the York Fair, attests to that establishing its band’s founding in 1849.  Mingus writes that Hay became a colonel and headed the largest regiment raised in York County in the Civil War – the 87th Pennsylvania. The note on this photo raises a curious question. The fair moved to its current quarters west of York in 1888. This contends the fair’s venue was at its longtime location on East King Street. To view a photo gallery of entertainers at the fair in history, check out: York Fair. For information on the York Fair’s anniversary year, check out: York Fair 250. Also of interest: The horrors of Civil War struck York soon after Sumter.

Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

York native Jacob L. Devers’ men reached the Rhine River in the fall of 1944. Historian Scott Wheeler, in a guest column in the York Sunday News, posed an important question about that accomplishment. Continue reading “York Fair 250: Civil War’s Worth Infantry band one of many entertainers to play at the fair” »

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Lafayette Club’s murals could expose York, Pa., history to a different audience

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Yorktowne Hotel for sale/Hake brothers in WW II

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Gordon Freireich’s recent York Sunday News column reminds you that there’s a treasure on the walls of the Lafayette Club. Murals of York in 1825, courtesy of the brush of  Charles X. Carlson. That period – 1825 – was the second visit of Lafayette to York, Pa. He first came here to meet with Continental Congress about a command in 1778. Carlson had the works of artist William Wagner in mind when undertaking the work in the Lafayette Club’s Tavern Room in 1960. Gordon made a creative observation in recognizing a dual purpose for the murals after York College’s Center for Community Engagement moves in. … ‘(T)here may be an opportunity to expose a combination of York history and art to a wider audience,’ he wrote. Yes, a new generation can learn about York, Pa.’s, past and its strong links with national events. Also of interest: Murals of the Lafayette Club, York County, Pa.

When news about York College’s purchase of the Lafayette Club came out, many people saw the Yorktowne Hotel as a beneficiary. And it probably will be – for a new owner.

The Yorktowne is for sale. A recent York Daily Record story pointed to the fact that it’s on the market – for more than $4 million. The right new buyer, in turn, might make the Lafayette Club a beneficiary of a re-energized  Yorktowne.

Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

Continue reading “Lafayette Club’s murals could expose York, Pa., history to a different audience” »

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This former Major Leaguer came from Red Land, home of the U.S. Little League winner. Can you ID him?

imagebaseballThis former Major League baseball player is from Goldsboro, the area covered by the U.S. Little League champs from the Red Land Little League. This achieving athlete, one of the most accomplished baseball players to come from York County, Pa., went on to coach in the Philadelphia Phillies organization. Can you ID this pro from northern York County? Answer. Also of interest: Check out these History Mystery quizzes and (fun) tests.

 

 

 

Below are 6 more History Mystery quizzes that will challenge you. (Click on the date if the photo does not appear on your mobile device).

Continue reading “This former Major Leaguer came from Red Land, home of the U.S. Little League winner. Can you ID him?” »

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Memory Lane in York County, Pa.: These 13 links will take you back

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Certain venues – existing, demolition and reused – around York, Pa., bring back floods of memories. Melvin’s is one of those. The Springettsbury Township ice cream bar was demolished to make way for Interstate 83. But people remember it well. Also of interest:  About Avalong’s and Melvin’s: ‘I am some what familiar with the history of the area.’

This photo slide show has 13 memory-tugging photos, starting with the Shoe House.

To find out more about these hangouts and places that will take you back, check out: Memory lane.
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Drive-in and indoor theater are nostalgia-provokers. The Stonybrook area of Springettsbury Township hosted both. The indoor theater came down in the late 1990s (seen here).  Also: These 12 links will take you down memory lane in York County, Pa.

Two other hangouts – White Oak Park and the Shady Dell:
Just try to resist this memory-tugging photo of White Oak Park.
Stadium will be site of The Oaks music reunion
Wanted: Old photos of teen hangout.
Memorabilia from ‘the Oaks’ hard to come by.
Memories of The Oaks pile up.
Memories of The Oaks pile up – Part II.
The Dell: ‘It was like family’.
White Oak Park welcomed Blaw-Knox workers .
Shady Dell was home away from home for many York County teens in ’60s.

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Where is the ‘Red Land’ region, as in the Red Land Little League champs?

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In history, Red Land, Redland or Redlands, home of the Little League World Series U.S. champs, has been viewed as residing in York County’s northern tip, loosely following the lines of the West Shore School District. Motorists on Interstate 83 might know this area as the  Newberrytown and Valley Green exits, and they climb from its valleys when crossing Reeser’s Summit.  Notice the reddish color of stone houses and barns in this region, made from the red sandstone prevalent there in ‘Red’ Land. Also of interest: Where does the ‘Red’ in Red Land Little League come from? Part I.

A guy I was with this weekend wondered about the location of Red Land, as in the home plate of the championship Red Land Little League team.

I wasn’t surprised by the question.

That part of York County north of the Big Conewago Creek has long been oriented toward Harrisburg. The rest of York County looks south, to Baltimore and points beyond.

So the mountains, hills and valleys of the Red Land area of York County aren’t known to some people in the York area.

So we’ll pose and try to answer 7 questions about the region that has spawned the champs, starting with:

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1. Where is ‘Red Land,’ as in the Red Land Little League champs?

 

Continue reading “Where is the ‘Red Land’ region, as in the Red Land Little League champs?” »

Posted in All politics is local, Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local landmarks, Susquehanna, waterways, Unsung/obscure sites, Wheels of York, York sports | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Where does the ‘red’ in Red Land Little League come from?

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Many buildings in the Red Land region of York County, Pa., used local minerals as building materials. Such is the case of Lewisberry’s Redlands Meetinghouse, one of a band of Quaker houses of worship in the region. Long ago, the red sandstone gave this northern tip of York County its name. Also of interest: Redlands Meetinghouse is on this list as 1 of 6 sites to discover and explore.

The Red Land Little League team’s success raises the question: Where does the “red” in Red Land come from?

The short answer: From a rock.

It’s a particular rock, red sandstone, found primarily in the northern part of York County.

York County historian Jim Rudisill provided information for this tour of  the area generally north of the Conewago Creek in this YorkTownSquare.com post: Big Conewago serves as physical, symbolic divider of York County culture. Continue reading “Where does the ‘red’ in Red Land Little League come from?” »

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This closed-down mystery drive-in theater in Southcentral Pennsylvania begs you to stop and take a look

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Leno visited Harley-Davidson/Artist William Wagner’s seal
theater
Seeing something like this around Southcentral Pa. for the first time will cause some lovers of history and nostalgia to pull over and take a look. And pull out your cell phone to document this scene. It’s a deserted drive-in theater, complete with the snack bar/projection booth, ticket booth and a smattering of speaker-less stands. Most drive-ins fell prey to developers – and video stores and their online descendants. And, reportedly in this case, to the need for digital projection equipment. The old theaters’ expansive green space along major highways made them valuable to builders. The Stonybrook Drive-in,  East York, and the Lincoln Drive-In in West Manchester Township are two examples of that. In SouthCentral Pennsylvania, two drive-ins continue to operate. Haar’s, near Dillsburg, and the Cumberland, near Newville, in Cumberland County. A commenter on a old theater website made this enticing comment in 2005 about the drive-in shown here: ‘The back row of the … is often used by the local Amish who come with their horse and buggies and listen to the sound on portable radios.’ Can you locate this deteriorating screen? See the answer below. Also of interest: Old Watling scale rescued from York’s HiWay Theater: It still tells your weight – and your fortune.

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Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

Continue reading “This closed-down mystery drive-in theater in Southcentral Pennsylvania begs you to stop and take a look” »

Posted in Antiquing & artifacts, Archives, all posts, Art & artists, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Nostalgia & memories, Small-town life, Unsung/obscure sites, William Wagner | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thomasville-area’s Biesecker’s Mill: ‘It’s a unique property, but evidently it’s so unique that no bank will touch it’

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Addition to New Oxford’s square/Street art going unnoticed?
bmBiesecker’s Mill is one of the most architecturally interesting mills standing in York County, Pa., today. An adaptive reuse plan to convert this Thomasville-area building into apartments is in limbo, though. ‘It’s a unique property, but evidently it’s so unique that no bank will touch it. So we’re kind of stuck here,’ owner Eric Bickleman told the York Daily Record. The rangy, pre-Civil War mill measures in at 17,000-square-feet. So with its future unclear (a GoFundMe site is set up), we’ll look at its past. The book ‘Millers’ Tales’ gives these facts about the mill. Products made there in its milling days: White Lily and White Swan flour, Yorko Dog Food, Golden Corn mill. Types of milling done there: grist, saw and distillery. The Biesecker in the name comes from one of its owners, John Biesecker. Also of interest: Where does York County’s Biesecker Mill get its name?
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Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

Continue reading “Thomasville-area’s Biesecker’s Mill: ‘It’s a unique property, but evidently it’s so unique that no bank will touch it’” »

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Discover these 17 neat places in your own York County, Pa., backyard. Actually, make that 18.

fairmount

Fairmount Park in Red Lion has a splash park, picnic area, modern playground and much more. It’s a place to play or just sit. And let’s not forget, it has a stately war memorial – as stately as any in York County, Pa. It’s a place to awaiting discovery. Also of interest: Five things to know about Red Lion’s grand Fairmount Park.

We’re constantly adding to this Places to Discover in Your Own York County Backyard series.

Today, we added one – Fairmount Park in Red Lion. Continue reading “Discover these 17 neat places in your own York County, Pa., backyard. Actually, make that 18.” »

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This York County, Pa., mystery estate sits on a hillside, but its putting green is flat

aerial
This beautiful ‪‎York County, Pa.,‬ estate, now a library and wedding venue, retains the putting green used by its owner. Where is this hillside estate? Have you been up there for an event? Please comment below. Here’s the answer. Also of interest: Check out these additional History Mystery quizzes and (fun) tests.

Here are 6 more History Mystery quizzes from this past week. (Click on the date if the photo does not appear on your mobile device)… .

Continue reading “This York County, Pa., mystery estate sits on a hillside, but its putting green is flat” »

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