New way of seeing York, Pa: Rail trail opens up new vistas of city

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Know much about Spring Grove?/Watch & Clock’s new exhibit
A view of the trail on the day of the official opening of a new section of the Heritage Rail Trail County Park in Springettsbury Township Wednesday, April 22, 2015. The new 2.5 mile section runs from a new bridge over the Codorus Creek at Emig Road in Manchester to a new lot at Loucks Mill Road and Route 30 in Springettsbury Township.    Kate Penn — Daily Record/Sunday News

Well, here’s a cityscape you don’t see every day. Although now, you can, if you travel along the York County Heritage Rail Trail’s Northern Extension. You now have easy access to this spot, looking at the Route 30 bridge with the city to its south. The new trail runs from Rudy Park to a lot near Loucks Mill Road, near Route 30. Eventually, it will lead into the city and meet up with the rail trail’s main trunk that runs to the Maryland Line along the path of the old Northern Central Railway. A question that’s out there: Codorus Navigation was a series of dams and locks that made the creek navigable from York to the Susquehanna River starting in the 1830s. Does the extension follow the navigation system’s old towpath in full or in part? History aside, the extension has many benefits. Here are two: It opens the beautiful natural area of the York Narrows to visitors and will mean pedestrian and bicycle traffic into York City’s markets and shops when it punches through. Check out this York Daily Record photo gallery of scenes along the new trail. Also of interest: Will this old bridge gain new life on York County’s Rail Trail?

 

Other unrelated, neat stuff from all over … .

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The National Clock & Watch Museum has opened a new exhibit: ‘Changing the Industrialized World.’ Continue reading “New way of seeing York, Pa: Rail trail opens up new vistas of city” »

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Penn Street Farmers’ Market: 7 views help tell its 150-year-old story

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The Civil War was over, and York County, Pa., was striving to return to its life of relative peace as a farming community. The Industrial Revolution would come in a few years, and the fertile, well-watered county and its residents were most familiar with its rich grain harvests, lush gardens and plentiful land for livestock to graze. These were the same assets the invading Confederates had remarked about – and helped themselves to – in 1863. So it was now 1866, and York borough residents were spreading out. Bottstown, as the land west of the Codorus Creek was known, needed a market to service west end farmers and residents. The Farmers’ Market at Penn and Market was formed in 1866, soon-to-be 150 years ago. Also of interest: York’s market No. 1: Penn Street Farmers’ Market.

Six more views below …

Continue reading “Penn Street Farmers’ Market: 7 views help tell its 150-year-old story” »

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People like York County, Pa.’s varied architecture – and what is under those buildings

This tunnel was the main way to move patients and food between buildings at this #YorkPa medical center 60 years or more…

Posted by York Daily Record/Sunday News on Tuesday, April 21, 2015

York countians are fascinated by buildings – because our architecture is interesting and varied. And they’re fascinated by what is under our buildings, as evidenced here. Also of interest: Check out these additional quizzes and (fun) tests – more than 100 of them.

Four more quizzes appear below. If the photo doesn’t appear on your mobile device, please click on the date. To find the answer, click on the answer link or the goo.gl link.

Continue reading “People like York County, Pa.’s varied architecture – and what is under those buildings” »

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Dirt track racing: It’s a longtime York County-area pastime

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: New owners for old York Post Office/The Golden Glow

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Ah, a spring racing evening at Williams Grove,  just over the York County, Pa., line in Cumberland County.  After a wet beginning to the 2015 racing season – rain doesn’t always mix well on a dirt track – sunshine came at last on April 17. A York Daily Record story put it this way: ‘After a rainy start to the local dirt track racing season, Mother Nature shined on Williams Grove Speedway on Friday night.’ So these fans catch the sunny scene at the track from atop a camper, as Williams Grove enters its 76th year. (See another photo below). Also of interest: 6 links capture big anniversary weekend at Williams Grove.

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Continue reading “Dirt track racing: It’s a longtime York County-area pastime” »

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Lincoln 150: These 10 stories link Abraham Lincoln to York County, Pa. – in life and death

Sermon on the Assassination of President Lincoln from Chanceford Presbyterian Church and Prospect Methodist Episcopal Church Rev. John Farquhar 1865 -  Tuesday March 24, 2015 at the Trust.  Photo courtesy York County Heritage Trust
The Rev. Henry E. Niles of York, Pa.’s First Presbyterian Church preached a sermon on the national day of mourning  – April 19, 1865 – after the death of Abraham Lincoln. It was reprinted and has become part of the canon of remembrances of Lincoln in York County. Not as well known was this reprinted sermon, preached on the same day in southeastern York County. Although sorrow wasn’t universal at this time of great division, most people in the three corners of York County mourned the passing of the 16th president. Also of interest: Check out all these ‘Abraham Lincoln was here’ posts from the start.

On this day 150 years ago, York countians were preparing for the visit of Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train – on its long, winding way to his final resting place in Illinois.

They were also aware that John Wilkes Booth, Lincoln’s assassin, was still at large.

Here are 10 links from recent York Daily Record/YorkTownSquare coverage of Lincoln 150 telling about those days of mourning, fear and uncertainty: Continue reading “Lincoln 150: These 10 stories link Abraham Lincoln to York County, Pa. – in life and death” »

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Mapping the Murals of York, Pa.: A new walking tour of city’s outdoor murals

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Lincoln 150/Art at Hugh McCall Mansion
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The rather obscure ‘Made in York’ mural on West Market Street stands out for several reasons: It’s the smallest mural of the Murals of York, Pa. The mural on the wall of the old Sam & Tony’s eatery is a bit hidden, which might be why vandals had their way with it recently. It was already one of the most blemished murals, peeling from the bottom up. Still, it effectively calls attention to York County’s heyday as a manufacturer of Pullmans (seen here) and other vehicles. It’s an early stop on a tour of the Murals of York, put forth by the York Daily Record’s Anthony Machcinski, below. So you could say this map is ‘Made in York,’ too. Also of interest: Colorful Murals of York, Pa., engaging and intriguing at old age.

Continue reading “Mapping the Murals of York, Pa.: A new walking tour of city’s outdoor murals” »

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How York County, Pa., changes, in four easy views

firehall1Springettsbury Township’s new firehall began the way all good projects do. With a concept and a felt need to modernize. That idea turned into an architectural drawing for a site – about a mile east of the township’s longtime firehall along the Lincoln Highway. On one level, the need to modernize considering the regional nature of Springettsbury fire and emergency medical services made for a compelling project. Still, York County lost  a bit more green space. It cost tax dollars. And you have to look at what’s left behind … (More below).

Continue reading “How York County, Pa., changes, in four easy views” »

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The Picket in Hanover’s Square: Surely, this is York County, Pa., at its best

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: York High legend dies/An original McDonald’s arch
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This equestrian statue, The Picket, is one of York County, Pa.’s finest memorials. It’s a commemoration of the major cavalry battle that took place on Hanover’s street – including on the Center Square site where the statue stands tall today. The Evening Sun’s Shane Dunlap captured this winsome scene, which is now the cover photo on that newsroom’s Facebook page.  The camera angle doesn’t quite get in another resident of the square, the dog Iron Mike, standing guard with The Picket. Surely, this scene shows York County, Pa., at its best. Also of interest: ‘Revitalizing Hanover, Pa.': Covering every angle of the town’s square.

Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

Continue reading “The Picket in Hanover’s Square: Surely, this is York County, Pa., at its best” »

Posted in Archives, all posts, Civil War, Delta Welsh quarryman, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Nostalgia & memories, War, York County at is best, York High achievers | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Civil War 150 and more: Linking up with the anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s assassination

On YorkTownSquare.com, we’ve been busy sharing pieces of York County, Pa., history linking up with the assassination of President Lincoln, the end of the Civil War and other big events from 150 years ago. (Check out these Civil War stories). Here’s one connecting with presidential trains in the Civil War era. But we’ve been sharing stories on other topics as well, as the photo quizzes below attest. Also of interest: Check out these quizzes and (fun) tests about York County’s past.

Please click on the goo.gl link for the answer of these 5 quizzes. If the photo doesn’t appear, click on the date.

Good luck, history sleuths … .

Continue reading “Civil War 150 and more: Linking up with the anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s assassination” »

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Abraham Lincoln, Part II: How many times did the 16th President’s trains touch York County?

BOOTH
Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train stopped in York, Pa., on April 21, 1865. The train’s sad visit to York’s North Duke Street station came only a couple of miles from where his assassin, John Wilkes Booth, attended school a dozen years before. This building at 420 Prospect St., is believed to have been Bland’s school or the Sherwood Academy. Lincoln’s train also rolled through York County on its way to Gettysburg for his famous speech in 1863. Often overlooked was the visit by the president-elect’s train, without the president-elect, in 1861. Also of interest: Abraham Lincoln, Part I: How many times did the 16th President’s train touch York County?

We know about Abraham Lincoln’s passage through York County in November 1863 to deliver what became known as the Gettysburg Address.

We’re learning about his funeral train’s visit to New Freedom and York on its long way to his interment in Springfield, Ill.

The following from my ‘East of Gettysburg’ tells about an almost-visit by President-election Abraham Lincoln to York in 1861: Continue reading “Abraham Lincoln, Part II: How many times did the 16th President’s trains touch York County?” »

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