Category Archives: Pain & trauma

See new York Town Square stories and photos at this link

On our 10th-year anniversary of blogging, York Town Square is moving to another platform on the York Daily Record’s brand new website, WWW.YDR.com.

York Town blog’s new address is WWW.YDR.COM/blog/yorktownsquare. So please bookmark it.

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Southcentral Pa.’s Good Roads Jubilee in 1921: ‘Longest automobile parade in U.S. history’

Some folks travel on Route 462 and Route 30 in York County, Pa., without a thought that they are moving on important ground in the history of the nation’s highway system. That road – still the most heavily used east/west route in York County – was the best Atlantic/Pacific route a century ago.

Posted in Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Mail bag, Pain & trauma, Unsung/obscure sites, Wheels of York, YorkEats: Hogmaw & such | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Southcentral Pa.’s Good Roads Jubilee in 1921: ‘Longest automobile parade in U.S. history’

150th anniversary of Lincoln assassination: Former York countian in Ford’s Theater on night president was shot

York County, Pa., learned about Abraham Lincoln’s death later the next day after the Friday, April 14, shooting. Chief Burgess David Small issued the protocol for the day, as seen on this handbill. Also of interest: Lincoln’s funeral train in … Continue reading

Posted in Abe Lincoln was here, All politics is local, All presidential stops, Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Pain & trauma | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on 150th anniversary of Lincoln assassination: Former York countian in Ford’s Theater on night president was shot

Nervous York County native Lawrence Gobright reported on Lincoln assassination

Lawrence Gobright, was a Hanover, Pa., native and a veteran Associated Press journalist. He career capstone was the terrible assignment of covering the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, five days after the Confederate surrender at Appomattox. ‘I carefully wrote my dispatch, … Continue reading

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Easter 1865 came in a season of conflict for York County, America

Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train followed this route on the Northern Central Railway through York County, Pa. It stopped in New Freedom to pick up Pennsylvania Gov. Andrew Curtin and in York, Pa.’s station. Lincoln’s death brought mourning to Easter in … Continue reading

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Hex Murder painting effectively captures terrible York County moment

York County’s Brett Greiman painted this scene of the Hex Murder of 1928 – a terrible moment in which a trio attacked and killed a farmer, a suspected witch, in an attempt to break a spell they believe he had … Continue reading

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How mills and mill dams have been forever part of York County life

York County, Pa., had more than 300 mills at one time. That means that its streams were crossed with more than 300 dams that backed up the creeks to supply the raceways that carried water to the mill wheels. Eight lowhead dams remain on area streams, although not all can be connected to mills. Conewago Creek’s Shady Nook Dam near the Davidsburg Road was built for recreational purposes in the 1930s. That dam made the news recently when it took the life of a York County boater.

Posted in Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, Farms, fields & mills, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Pain & trauma, Unsung/obscure sites | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on How mills and mill dams have been forever part of York County life

Burning of Chambersburg in Civil War: ‘It’s hard to imagine the destruction’

Jubal Early’s Confederates burned Chambersburg, Pa., 150 years ago this week. ‘It’s hard to imagine the destruction that followed the burning of Chambersburg by Confederate troops on July 30, 1864. The fire destroyed 550 structures, left 2,000 people homeless and resulted in more than $750,000 in lost property,’ the Public Opinion in Chambersburg wrote in: The Burning of Chambersburg: 150 years later. A year earlier, Early’s men occupied York, Pa., about 50 miles to the East.

Posted in All politics is local, Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, Fires & firefighters, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Pain & trauma, War | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Quiet Arles Park teaches active lessons about York, Pa.

This marker, with plaque, marks Arles Park in York, Pa.’s, east end. The plaque gives a brief history of the city park at East King and Pattison streets. It was dedicated in 1961, six years after the formation of York … Continue reading

Posted in All politics is local, Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Pain & trauma, Unsung/obscure sites, War, World War II, York City neighborhoods | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Quiet Arles Park teaches active lessons about York, Pa.

A black Civil War volunteer’s heroism, and how his deeds in Wrightsville came to be recognized

This 1930 photograph from a Columbia-Wrightsville Bridge booklet shows part of the battlefield in Wrightsville 70 years after the Civil War. A Confederate brigade, under the command of John B. Gordon, approached the town from the west, bottom, and ran into an assortment of Union troops – regulars, invalids from the military hospital in York, militia and civilian volunteers. The Confederates sought to secure the bridge. Union command ordered the bridge burned to stop that advance. They succeeded.

Posted in Black history, Civil War, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Notable images, Pain & trauma, Susquehanna, waterways, Unsung/obscure sites, War | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on A black Civil War volunteer’s heroism, and how his deeds in Wrightsville came to be recognized