In Red Lion: Working on the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad, Part II

Linked in/Neat stuff: Old Tanger Hardware/Hershey antique auto show

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The upcoming holiday season represents a favorite time to see model train displays around York County, Pa. Here’s a permanent display, a look at the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad line. It’s in the Red Lion Train Station Model Railroaders Club in the Red Lion Area Historical Society’s Ma & Pa Railroad Station Museum. There’s some real railroad work going on outside. A section measuring 190 feet of the old line is being restored near the station, as this YDR story details. Also of interest: In Red Lion: Working on the Ma & Pa Railroad.

Other neat stuff from all over …

Eric Conner of Lancaster has a large collection of Pennsylvania gubernatorial memorabilia.

He has some stuff, of course, from the current Corbett-Wolf campaign. His collection goes back to 1820.

He wrote this in a recent press release: Continue reading “In Red Lion: Working on the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad, Part II” »

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These old York County steps, Part 6: Where did they lead?

Linked in/Neat stuff: York Valley Inn’s attic/Mike Waugh’s drawing of York County
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These Springettsbury Township, Pa., steps with railings don’t make sense. Why would someone want to walk from one fast-food place – Wendy’s – to another, Arby’s, both the the 2700 block of Route 462. So they must be left over from another time. In fact, that’s right, as Stephen H. Smith explains in his YorksPast blog: Bury’s in Springettsbury Township was not just Hamburgers.  Check out his explanation below. Past posts in the series – These old York County steps….

Continue reading “These old York County steps, Part 6: Where did they lead?” »

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Along York’s West Philadelphia Street: One spot says a lot

Linked in/Neat stuff: Tanger Hardware building’s tenant/Fire equipment displayed

pmk-flowers1Ten years ago, this scene captured one of several new projects sprouting around York. It says a lot. You have the Susquehanna Commerce Center, prime professional office space, that went up on an industrial brownfield. This serves as a prime example of the service sector replacing heavy industry. Indeed, the bridge at the rear of this former brownfield was a major meeting place for union members seeking to better conditions in York, Pa.’s, plentiful heavy industries. The metal flowers, made from industrial parts, combine the craftsmanship of factory workers with the new emphasis on arts in the city. These blooming flowers are a kind of a concrete – or metal – example of ‘Creativity Unleashed,’ a marketing concept that promotes the craftsmen of York’s past with the artisans of the present. This program again points to the transition from an industrial to service economy. Both the flowers and the office building are ‘watered’ by the nearby Codorus Creek, which then – and now – was drawing development along its banks. One spot, indeed, says a lot. Things do change in York, Pa. For a review of those decade-ago projects, check out: A decade of changes. Also of interest: Foodstruck event offers insight about direction York, Pa., is heading.

Other neat stuff from all over … .

Continue reading “Along York’s West Philadelphia Street: One spot says a lot” »

Posted in Antiquing & artifacts, Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, Farms & fields, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Nostalgia & memories, Unsung/obscure sites, War, World War II | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

History Mystery quiz: What was John Wilkes Booth’s connection to York, Pa.?

At a recent Leadership York class that I recently helped lead, the topic came up. Did you know John Wilkes Booth spent time in York, Pa.? Class members were surprised. But when and where? Click on the ‘goo.gl’ link above to find out, if you don’t know. And do the same if you’re stumped on any other five quizzes below. Also of interest: Check out additional history mystery quizzes.

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Continue reading “History Mystery quiz: What was John Wilkes Booth’s connection to York, Pa.?” »

Posted in All politics is local, Antiquing & artifacts, Archives, all posts, Black history, Civil War, Explanations/controversy, Famous York visitors, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Old York Color Works building visible, colorful symbol of progress in York, Pa.

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The old Keystone Color Works building in York, Pa.’s, Northwest Triangle has gained a higher profile since developers presented a plan to convert it into luxury apartments. Then comes ‘Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival?’ showing a photo (see below) of the old factory in a slide show about York County. That project of four public media stations is looking at issues affecting cities in Pennsylvania. Springettsbury Township’s Jane Lindhorn recently submitted a photo to YDR History gallery of the Color Works. ‘My father has been fascinated with Keystone Color Works since he read about it in the Daily Record,’ she wrote. And Yorkblogger Stephen H. Smith posted this photo on his YorksPast site, with a detailed explanation about the company.  Also of interest: Keystone Color Works building to be brushed up for Artspace?

Two things about the  ‘Keystone Crossroads’ project showing before and after photographs of York.

First, notice that in the lead-in and – actually, in the entire piece – thankfully does not default to often-inaccurate descriptions like hardscrabble city or a hard-luck river town as outside media often characterize York.

Here’s the lead-in: Continue reading “Old York Color Works building visible, colorful symbol of progress in York, Pa.” »

Posted in Archives, all posts, Events, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Harley-Davidson, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Made in York, Nostalgia & memories, Notable images, Susquehanna, waterways, Unsung/obscure sites, Wheels of York | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

In Red Lion, Pa.: Working on the Ma & Pa Railroad

Linked in/Neat stuff: Civil War conscientious objectors/Cameron Mitchell Day
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Jan Barnhart of the Red Lion Area Historical Society emailed in an update about Ma & Pa Railroad station renovations in the borough. The historical group has been working on the station for about 15 years and is finishing restoration work there, including the relaying of the rails.  ‘They were removed for a Red Lion borough drainage and water project several years ago,’ Barnhart wrote. ‘Volunteers from the Society and Model RR club have been helping under the supervision of a professional railroad man. We are about half way finished. Since the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad virtually built the town of Red Lion, it is an important part of local history. This rail line was also vital to the prosperity of the southeastern quadrant of the county … . ‘  Also of interest:  Red Lion, then and now: ‘Welcome to a popular page on our web site’.

 

Other neat stuff from all over … .

Continue reading “In Red Lion, Pa.: Working on the Ma & Pa Railroad” »

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Sunday big day for history in Glen Rock, Pa.

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This plaque will be dedicated Sunday, Oct. 5, at the Glen Rock Fire Company. The dedication will be part of a day of activities in this historic southern York County borough. Also of interest: Good night in Glen Rock: Dinner and a movie and the American Dream.

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Southern York County’s Glen Rock has a lot of history and does a lot to make it known.

Indeed, its program of placing plaques on historic buildings around this walkable town is more consistent and better done than any other town in York County.

Continue reading “Sunday big day for history in Glen Rock, Pa.” »

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This unexpected thing was fished from a York County, Pa., creek in a cleanup

Linked in/Neat stuff: A day in New Oxford/Where is Weco?
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Some were surprised with what was fished out of Lightner’s Creek in Manchester Township recently. That creek produced a casket lid in a recent cleanup. York has been home to a casketmaker for decades – York Casket. In fact, before and after York Casket formed in 1932, funeral homes made caskets in many small towns around York County. Or rather furniture makers operated funeral homes. Or both. No telling the source of the Lightner Creek casket lid or how it ended up in the creek. But casketmaking has been part of York County’s woodworking landscapes for centuries. Also of interest: When York County undertakers served as woodworkers … and vice versa.

Other neat stuff from all over … .

You might see references to places like Weco, the Market District and Royal Square around town.

The York Daily Record’s Hannah Sawyer explained in a recent story that it grows from a market campaign operating on the theory: “If you name it, they will come.” Continue reading “This unexpected thing was fished from a York County, Pa., creek in a cleanup” »

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When York County, Pa. Bibles were printed in German, and Fractur was the typeface

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This early American Bible was on display at the recent unveiling of the 2014 Journal of York County Heritage at the York County Heritage Trust. The German-language book was published by Christopher Saur in 1776 and used at Black Rock Church of the Brethren. ‘This was the first Bible printed with American-made paper, and American-made typeset,’ Dianne Bowders, who put up the small exhibit, told a gathering at the event. Also of interest: Composer Dominick Argento profiled in 2014 scholarly journal.

Church of the Brethren historian Elmer Gleim’s article on his denomination’s gathering in York a century again is his third article published in a scholarly journal – the Journal of York County Heritage.

His daughter, Dianne Bowders, spoke on his behalf at a recent unveiling of the 2014 journal. She said the 98-year-old has experienced some ill health, and he’s recovering from a stroke.

That has challenged the right-handed scholar’s ability to write, so he’s learning to write with his left hand, so, according to his daughter, “there may be another article next year.”

In her remarks, Dianne Bowders told an audience at the journal’s unveiling about Church of the Brethren history, as well as some details about an early American Bible.

Here are excerpts: Continue reading “When York County, Pa. Bibles were printed in German, and Fractur was the typeface” »

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The Judicial Center: Is it York County’s 4th or 5th courthouse?

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The tall York County Judicial Center has offered the public views from all directions since it was dedicated 10 years ago. Here a visitor looks down on the Strand-Capitol complex on North George Street in York Pa. When it went up, the judicial center was among several high-profile projects new to York – the biggest and most expensive of them all. Check them out: A decade of changes. Also of interest: York County Courthouse – now Administrative Center. What do you call it? 

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York County Judge John Uhler was a driving force for the new Judicial Center,, dedicated 10 years ago,

He recently provided these decade-plus-old comments setting the Judicial Center in history and raising an interesting question about whether the center is York County’s fourth of fifth court facility:

Continue reading “The Judicial Center: Is it York County’s 4th or 5th courthouse?” »

Posted in A civil action, All politics is local, Archives, all posts, Cops & courts, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment