This York County mystery place just looks like it has an interesting past. And it does.

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History Mystery: This place just looks like it has significance – and it does. This landmark served as a railroad hotel and restaurant to serve Northern Central Railway riders after it went up in 1883. It served as a stop for people coming into town from the York County, Pa., countryside as well. It has been remodeled several times over the decades and serves as an eatery today. Can you locate this place? Answer. If you want to see reader comments on this place, check out these Facebook comments. Also of interest: For a host of quizzes and (fun) tests from the past. check out: History Mystery.

Here are 5 more History Mystery quizzes about York County. (If the photo does not appear on your mobile device, please click on the date … . Continue reading “This York County mystery place just looks like it has an interesting past. And it does.” »

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6 views of New Freedom, Pa., a pleasant town of travelers, past and present

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Until the last part of the 20th century, New Freedom was a relatively self-contained railroad town. As did several York County towns, it had its own theater, now Bonkey’s Ice Cream. So it remains a popular meeting place in the borough. Since Interstate 83 was completed in 1959, New Freedom has increasingly become a bedroom community for workers who drive to Baltimore each day and return to their homes in this attractive town in the evening. So New Freedom, built around the railroad, remains a town of travelers, who are part of what is called the Maryland Migration. Also of interest: Transportation has defined the neighboring town of Shrewsbury, too.

New Freedom gained a spot on the map as the first stop on the Northern Central Railway north of the Mason-Dixon Line.

So steam trains would pause there – Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train was one – to take on water from this summit stop on the line.

Railroading – and its beneficiaries – are still seen around this southern York County community.

Here is a brief ‘biography’ of the town. 5 more views of the town are below.

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Posted in Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Nostalgia & memories, Notable images, School days, Small-town life, Unsung/obscure sites, Wheels of York, York County's towns, YorkEats: Hogmaw & such | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

This cityscape art featuring York’s Central Market hangs in … York’s Central Market

Linked in/Neat stuff, below: Big auction in Biglerville/An archives awaiting discovery
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Yes, there’s artwork popping up everywhere around the city of York, Pa. And the art pictured here is appropriately in the Market/Arts District.  Penn Mar Human Services recently assembled the cityscape, left, of the Central Market in York – and posted it in the Central Market in York.  It’s a bit high up and thus can be overlooked. It’s best seen from the market’s balcony. Which reminds me of Jason Plotkin’s photo essay of remote and obscure features of the old markethouse found via: Central Market, as you’ve never seen it. And for those who just want to know more about Central Market in stories and photos, you like this: York’s Central Market sells steak … and sizzle.

Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

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6 more cool, unsung York/Adams, Pa., sites to discover and explore

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This unsung site is hardly off the beaten track, as many often-overlooked places are. But Gettysburg’s square should not be forgotten as a place to spend time on those treasured trips to the Gettysburg National Military Park and other attractions. The visitors center is now farther away from this crossroads, but remember that this part of Gettysburg saw fighting, too. And there are museums, shops linked up to the Civil War and prime restaurants within walking distance. In fact, the must-see National Cemetery, with its Lincoln connections, and nearby Ziegler’s Grove, with its Pickett Charge links, are a reasonable walk from this square, seen here from the roof of the Gettysburg Hotel. Also of interest: 6 cool, unsung York County, Pa., sites to discover and explore.

These places might be new.

Or they might be familiar and you maybe never thought of them in this way before.

They’re awaiting your visit, to give you that thrill of discovery – or rediscovery.

Check out  5 more unsung sites … .

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York County’s Stone Mill 1792: A room with a view. In fact, many of them

Linked in/Neat stuff: Endangered Civil War museum/Hake’s big-time auction house

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When we’ve posted stories and photos about The Stone Mill 1792 in the past, people show great interest. No wonder. This place is beautiful. This historic former mill in Glenville in southwestern York County has been reopened as an event and wedding venue. The public can stroll its grounds and interior at an open house set for July 24-26. Details: Stone Mill 1792. Also of interest: Glenville’s Stone Mill picture perfect after snowfall.

Continue reading “York County’s Stone Mill 1792: A room with a view. In fact, many of them” »

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Scarred Civil War soldier took the surrendered York flag and ‘stood with it in his arms, holding it in front of him’

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‘Surrender of York to Gen. Early and Gen. Gordon, June 28th 1863,’ wrote Lewis Miller atop his drawing of this significant moment in York County, Pa., history. The Confederates overran York County in these late-June days before the Battle of Gettysburg. They pulled down this flag in York after the town’s fathers sought them out at their camp, 10 miles to the west, the night before. York’s Committee of Safety surrendered the town in a deal that looked like this: York wouldn’t resist the rebel advance if the Confederates wouldn’t burn it and otherwise harm the citizenry. In this drawing, notice the Confederate flags carried by the various rebel units of the Army of Northern Virginia. As far as is known, no Confederate flag was hoisted atop this pole. This is one of two iconic drawings of Miller’s work showing the Confederates in York’s square.  See below for the other drawing. Both are part of the York County Heritage Trust’s extensive Miller collection. More:  Pro/Con: Should York’s leaders have surrendered to the rebels.

One May afternoon in 1861, workers raised a 110-foot-tall pine pole with a foot-thick base in York’s Centre Square.

It stood tall between the two squat market sheds at Market and George that had occupied this public gathering space for years.

Judge Robert J. Fisher and the Rev. J.A. Ross of York’s Methodist Church addressed the large crowd that had gathered for the pole raising.

A beautiful bunting flag was run up the pole as a band played “The Star-Spangled Banner,” then a patriotic song appropriate for a Northern town whose side was then embroiled in a bloody and corrosive Civil War.

Earlier, the pole raising came at a price. Continue reading “Scarred Civil War soldier took the surrendered York flag and ‘stood with it in his arms, holding it in front of him’” »

Posted in All politics is local, Art & artists, Civil War, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Lewis Miller, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, War | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Obscure WeCo plaque reflects early days of York City’s development rebirth

Linked in/Neat stuff: York Safe & Lock file damaged/Mayflies in history?
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This plaque, affixed to this 234 W. Market St.  building  in York, Pa.’s WeCo district, hangs there in plain sight. And it details the life and accomplishments of high school dropout Sheldon Lloyd, a man of many gifts, including those of a preservationist. There are two points to be made about this plaque that observes the life and 2002 death of Lloyd. First, Lloyd’s efforts to rehab this building, right beside the historic Codorus Hotel, were part of an early buildup toward the extensive restoration work underway around the city today. The second point is the presence of the plaque itself, a best practice that could be extended to other notable buildings in the city. This discussion on the Fixing York Facebook page surrounds the idea of marking significant buildings with stories about their past. And below, learn a bit more about Sheldon Lloyd. Also of interest: Former Hupmobile dealership in WeCo district, now in Royal hands.
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This former York countian has made it big. Can you identify him and how he did it?

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He is a graduate of a ‪‎York County, Pa.,‬ high school and went on to found a company that produces an amazingly popular social media tool. And he has generously come back to his hometown to share how he did it. Can you ID this talented former York countian and the name of his digital invention? Answer: History Mystery. Also of interest: Check out more of these York County history quizzes and (fun) tests and A guide to York countians who made it big and These two York Suburban grads have scored Rhodes scholarships.

6 more History Mystery quizzes below. (If photos don’t appear on your mobile devices, please click on the date).

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Posted in Archives, all posts, Delta Welsh quarryman, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, God & York County, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Unsung/obscure sites, YorkEats: Hogmaw & such | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Vacation Bible School scene in Old Towne East neighborhood: Surely this is York, Pa., at its best

Linked in/Neat stuff: Susquehanna River cottages endangered/Inside-outside at Indian Steps
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‘It’s like a #Mennonite model show in #iloveyorkcity. Props to @ydrcom journalist @walt_walters for pointing this out,’ York, Pa., Daily Record photographer Jason Plotkin wrote in a tweet. Those photographed were part of this summer’s Vacation Bible School at Tidings of Peace Mennonite Church on East Poplar Street. When you think of York City, you think of diversity as a key asset. This scene shows another part of that rich diversity. The Mennonite Church has been in York’s Olde Towne East neighborhood for 60 years. Surely, this is York, Pa., at its best. Also of interest: Old Towne East, Salem Square neighborhoods explored. Here’s a map of York City neighborhoods yet to come.

Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

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Posted in All politics is local, Archives, all posts, Art & artists, Cliff Satterthwaite, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Notable images, Susquehanna, waterways, Susquehannocks/Conestogas, Unsung/obscure sites, York City neighborhoods, York County at is best | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Change in Springettsbury Township, Pa. – Then: Near Avalong Farms. Now: BAM and Big Lots!

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Artist Cliff Satterthwaite labeled this photo as Avalong Homestead. I thought the Meadowbrook, now Christmas Tree Hill in that popular corner of Springettsbury Township deserved that label. So I asked the reigning expert on the township, Yorkblogger Stephen H. Smith for some help. As usual, he came through: ‘These are buildings on the farm just east of the Meadowbrook (Avalong) Mansion & Barns. The pictured farm was tucked in the southwest corner of Mt. Zion & Whiteford Roads; right across from the Avalong Dairy Bar. I guess Cliff thought it must have been the Avalong homestead since it was much smaller than the Avalong Mansion, however it was there long before Alva Long acquired the properties in 1950.’ Stephen said BAM & BigLots! now stand at this location and pointed out that a Satterthwaite-provided 1973 photo, with a longer view of the same site,  can be seen in this YorksPast story. Stephen also noted that built-up earthworks for the Route 30 bypass, as it’s still called, can be seen in both views. Interesting that recently another corner in Springettsbury – Mt. Zion and Route 462 – has also drawn a developer’s attention. Check out these additional drawings from Cliff Satterthwaite. Also of interest: This Springetts corner bears witness to a changing York, Pa.

Other neat, unrelated stuff from all over … .

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Posted in Archives, all posts, Art & artists, Cliff Satterthwaite, Farms, fields & mills, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Unsung/obscure sites, York County's Tom Wolf, YorkEats: Hogmaw & such | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment