7 more history quizzes to test your York smarts

It’s interesting how quickly we forget those who have built this community. I regularly put up photographs of these achievers on YDR’s Facebook page. Sometimes, the people of accomplishment receive little recognition. You can tell by the low number of likes, comments and shares on Facebook. Still, it’s important for us to know these greats, so we’ll keep telling their stories on Facebook and on this blog. And about accomplished families, too, as shown below. Also of interest: Check out these past quizzes and fun tests about York County’s past.

If stumped, click on the ‘goo.gl’ link in the quizzes below. If you want to see what other people have to say – or weigh in yourself – click on comment (or like or share).
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275th birthday observance of York’s founding isn’t a sexy number but may be effective, Part III

250
This major York County, Pa., 250 parade heads to the York Expo Center in 1999. The year-long observance of the county’s big Aug. 19, 1749, birthday culminated in this march, which started in Continental Square and ended on the track at the old fairgrounds. Also of interest: Is the 10th anniversary of York County’s 250th significant? 

I took a recent post here - Remember York County’s big 250th birthday celebration in 1999? Much has happened in the past 15 years - and expanded it into a York Sunday News column.

That column - Let’s truly celebrate York’s 275th birthday – calls for just that. York was founded in 1741, and that 275th should not go without a celebration.

I call for the occasion as a moment for York County’s arts and artists to show off – to unleash their creativity.

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York County doesn’t like change? Wyndridge Farm reuse challenges that

Linked in/Neat stuff: Susquehanna Trail revisited/Chestnut Street prison in news
image
Wyndridge Farm near Dallastown has found two new uses for a 77-acre farm and 120-year-old barn. Wyndridge Crafty hard cider is made there, and the place is being developed into a special events venue. That means weddings and such. ‘The plan is to make Wyndridge Farm into what (owner) Steve Groff calls “a craft beverage destination and special events venue” that will draw visitors from throughout the mid-Atlantic,’ a YDR.com story states. This transition of the land from farm to service use is the agricultural equivalent of the popular practice in York County of making residential lofts from old red-brick factory buildings. Both examples of reuse are positive signs of the times and a way, in the Wyndridge Farm example, of keeping York County’s countryside beautiful. Of course, you can argue that making hard cider and beer on agricultural land is a time-honored York County tradition, so nothing has changed. (Just to remind folks of the more traditional use of farms, check out the photo below.) Also of interest:  Glen Rock hilltop farm: ‘You cannot stay stressed here for long’.

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Floorola shifted in World War II from waxing floors to scrubbing Axis foes, Part II

Floorola converts to defense work
This was Floorola Products Inc.’s manufacturing plant on Maryland Avenue in York in February 1942. An Office of War Information photographer visited York, Pa., to show how manufacturers were converting to defense work, just three months after Pearl Harbor. The photo’s caption: ‘Conversion. Floor waxer plant. Formerly producing floor waxing and polishing machines, this small Eastern factory is now one of the America’s myriad plants devoted to production of small machine parts for war purposes. Foreseeing possibilities of shortage of aluminum (necessary for polishing equipment), this factory’s owner sought defense subcontracts many months ago, he is now operating twenty-two hours a day with a crew of thirty workers, a distinct improvement over his previous eight hours, three-worker days. ‘ The plant stands today. For an ‘after’ photo, see below. Also of interest:  Floorola shifted from waxing floors to scrubbing Axis foes, Part I.

The Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information documented America in the Great Depression and World War II.

Government photographers made several visits to York County and their work on Floorola, York Safe & Lock and other county sites can be found on this Library of Congress site.

Check out these three photos, including the ‘after’ photo captured in July 2014, plus a bonus FSA photo of  a rural York County scene:

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Posted in Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, Farms & fields, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Made in York, Notable images, Unsung/obscure sites, War, World War II, York Safe & Lock | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

A peek inside Hanover’s magnificent Sheppard Mansion

Linked in/Neat stuff: Hex Murder witness dies/Codorus Street reunion

mansion

Many people driving by the Sheppard Mansion in Hanover, Pa., wonder what this magnificent structure looks like inside. Well, the Evening Sun in Hanover heard such requests and offers an intriguing 16-photo gallery. The Evening Sun also put forth this history lesson about the house built from the proceeds of Hanover Shoes: ‘Built in 1913, the historic Sheppard Mansion was originally owned by H.D. Sheppard and his wife Henrietta Sheppard. After Henrietta died in 1960, the family vacated the home, leaving it empty for decades. In 1998 great-granddaughters Kathryn Hoar and Heather Lunn restored the mansion and made it a bed and breakfast.’ (The mansion is open for cooking classes. See below). Also of interest: Two ornate mansions that Hanover Shoe built.

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Posted in Archives, all posts, Black history, Books & reading, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Hex murder, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, People, Unsung/obscure sites, Women's history | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How a York, Pa., man documented famous Masons – and even anti-Masons

Linked in/Neat stuff: Historical markers important/Men march off to WW I
"Masonic Articles I Have Written" by Brother C. Clark JuliusSubmitted
Author/educator/storyteller Judy Wolfman was visiting Country Meadows Retirement Community in West Manchester Township recently when someone handed her this compilation of ‘Masonic Articles I Have Written.’ C. Clark Julius wrote this as an author’s preface: ‘I am a historian and enjoy hunting prominent people and finding whether they are Masons. This lead to the 68 articles I have written and have again had many requests to put them in book form.’ Thus, the book, published in 1991. His essays include profiles on several notable people with York County ties – Thaddeus Stevens, Gen. Horatio Gates  and James Wilkinson, among others. According to ‘Masonic Articles,’ Stevens, the Civil War-era law and abolitionist, was an anti-Mason, and Revolutionary War officers Gates and Wilkinson were Masons. I told Judy I would deliver her gift – and Clark Julius labor of love – to the York County Heritage Trust’s Archives.

A bit more about Clark Julius below … .

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Zimmerman Center on the Susquehanna: They came by land and river to see the improvements

Kayaks lined up at the water access from visitors arriving by the Susquehanna River. Paul Kuehnel - Daily Record/Sunday News
‘By land and by boat, visitors stopped at the center Saturday to see the improvements.’ So said a subhead on a York, Pa., Daily Record story about a day in which visitors could see improvements to the already vastly improved John and Kathryn Zimmerman Center for Heritage. Mark Platts, president of Susquehanna Gateway Heritage Area, said the revamped Lower Windsor Township site links water to land. ‘Platts said work at the site has connected the Native Lands County Park to the center, and the center to a new pavilion and the Susquehanna River,’ the YDR story stated. Users can access the pavilion from dawn to dusk. Also of interest: A bit more about the Long Level’s Dritt House (now the Zimmerman Center), before and after renovations.

Interestingly, a York County Heritage Trust tweet showed boaters disembarking at Long Level in 1950. Today, those on the water have another place to come ashore to soak in some history.

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6 more history quizzes to test your York smarts

Here’s another test of your York Smarts. But not all quizzes on the YDR’s Facebook page are History Mysteries. Some merely reflect on things that York countians have done – and are doing, such as in the example above. York countians have all kinds of interests and these ‘Days gone by posts’ reflect on that. Below, we return to History Mysteries … . Also of interest: Check out this full course of YorkTownSquare quizzes and fun tests, including past history mystery quizzes.

Feel free to engage by liking, commenting and sharing. If stumped, click on the goo.gl link.

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Papermaker scores 150th: Why Glatfelter doors are red and other Spring Grove stories

The Glatfelter Story

Glatfelter has produced this nicely done and informative 45-minute video as part of its 150th-anniversary celebration. Glatfelter started as a single Spring Grove mill in 1863 and now is a sprawling, international company. ‘When I first came to Spring Grove,’ Amanda Glatfelter is quoted at the video’s beginning, ‘the mill was standing where the Western Maryland Railroad crosses my front lawn. A dozen houses, most of them built of logs, comprised the village … .’ We’ll hear from the wife of P.H. Glatfelter at the end of this post, where you can view the video, courtesy of YouTube. Also of interest: Casper Glattfelder’s legacy: Glatfelters, Gladfelters, Glotfeltys, Clodfelters and Clotfelters – and more.

“The Glatfelter Story” carved the company’s 150-year history into four eras. And the video has a bonus at the end. Why all Glatfelter buildings have red doors.

Here’s that’s story within the story: Continue reading “Papermaker scores 150th: Why Glatfelter doors are red and other Spring Grove stories” »

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At York County’s first courthouse, there was no picnic in the pillory

Linked in/Neat stuff: Want to help preserve G’Burg monuments?/A yellow bank barn

 

Check out these new and improved stocks at the Colonial Courthouse in York, courtesy of Boy Scout Troop 20 and the York County Heritage Trust’s Facebook page. The pillory has long been a popular part of the replica along the Codorus of York County’s first courthouse. Of course, the real stocks in the original courthouse were not popular – with criminals. Sentences were stiff in those days. According to ‘Nine Months in York Town,’ crowds loved when they were in use, jeering and throwing rotten eggs at the criminals so confined. They would choke on dust kicked up by passing wagons. Courts ordered officials to cut off the ears of some criminals and nail them to the pillory. One doesn’t have to stand in – or near – this replica stocks for very long to understand that crime did not pay in the mid-1700s. There was no picnic in the pillory. One other thought: When criminals were placed side-by-side in stocks such as these, wonder what they said to each other?  Also interest: Display marks how York County’s courthouses evolved.
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Other interesting stuff from all over … .

Last week, a 14-year-old fell 30 feet off rocks in Devil’s Den at Gettysburg National Military Park. She complained of  pain. Continue reading “At York County’s first courthouse, there was no picnic in the pillory” »

Posted in Antiquing & artifacts, Archives, all posts, Art & artists, Cliff Satterthwaite, Explanations/controversy, Famous York visitors, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment