These 10 York County history topics are graduate theses waiting to happen, Part II

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This photo does what it was meant to do: Capture York, Pa.’s, industrial might in World War II. With this many execs in command and the York Plan in high gear, the Allies would win against the Axis threat. (When seeing this iconic photo, I always wonder how Yorktowne Hotel staff served the fare. These mighty captains of industry would be forced to pass the course down the table. Servers couldn’t fit between the packed rows.) These leaders were part of the York Plan, a cooperative effort to pools, machinery and manpower to executive large defense contracts. See a female manager at work below: Floorola shifted from waxing floors to scrubbing Axis foes.

In the last post – Part I: These York County history topics are graduate theses waiting to happen – I cover themes that have been covered. And some that need to be covered.

Here’s quick hit list of 10 more topics that call for more academic work and subsequent publication in book or digital form: Continue reading “These 10 York County history topics are graduate theses waiting to happen, Part II” »

Posted in Alcohol & tobacco, Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, Farms & fields, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Made in York, One-room schools, School days, Small-town life, Vietnam War, War, World War II | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

These York County history topics are graduate theses waiting to happen

snyder'sOne-room schools intrigue and captivate York countians. More work is needed to inventory and identify these 300 or more sturdy structures that were a way of life in York County, Pa., from the 1830s to the 1950s. Then we must learn about their impact on York County some 60 years after the last one closed. One such school is pictured above. Glen Rock’s John ‘Otts’ Hufnagel studied the whereabouts of this old building, identified it as Snyder’s School. It was located off Route 216. ‘If you come out of Glen Rock, pass the old Foust Distillery about half a mile, there is a road to the left called Rishel Road. If you go up Rishel Road and start down the backside of the hill, it was back in there is what I was told,’ he wrote in an email.  This photo, from Nov. 7, 1921, includes  Lewis A. Lentz, far right, second row, and his sister, Erma Lentz, third from right, third row. Also of interest: Check out these stories and photos about York County’s one-room schools. and York County’s one-room schools represent a master’s degree waiting to happen and Part I: More history topics ready for graduate thesis.

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I recently ran across a past Gettysburg-based Civil War Institute’s presentation schedule that listed a speech with an intriguing title.

That 2013 speech, by noted scholar Gary Gallagher, was titled:  ”Is There Anything Left to Say About the Battle of Gettysburg?”

I immediately applied that to York County. Every year, a half dozen or more books are published about York County topics. Continue reading “These York County history topics are graduate theses waiting to happen” »

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Codorus Creek had swinging bridge, but ‘You couldn’t swing it much’

Linked in/Neat stuff: Weco?/Most peaceful place in York County?

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‘We kids would go up there on that swinging bridge in the summertime and, in between working hours, we’d dive off of the bridge into the creek or we’d make it swing. You couldn’t swing it much, but a little bit. We had great times there at that swinging bridge.’ Late in life, Raymond Sechrist provided these boyhood recollections of this swinging bridge.This tightly bound span provided a short cut for workers walking from North York to York Safe & Lock and back. It crossed at Small Meadow. Thanks to Papergreat.com for making this colorized postcard available. It was addressed to Miss Georgia B. Klinefelter of East Orange, N.J., in 1911. The photo in this YorkTownSquare post – When the bridge over the Codorus moved - provides a black-and-white view of the bridge and the story with it provides other Sechrist memories. Also of interest: Check out these other stories and photos about York Safe & Lock.

Other neat stuff from all over… . Continue reading “Codorus Creek had swinging bridge, but ‘You couldn’t swing it much’” »

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It’s a History Mystery! Photos/stories score well on Facebook, other social media

 

Twice a day, seven days a week, I put up History Mystery photos on YDR’s Facebook page. One example is above and others below.

I do this for several reasons YDR’s Facebook page  has a following of more than 32,000 fans, so it gets York County history places, people and stories before a large audience. The audience over there are not history specialists, so it gets YorkPa history before a group of “lay people,” who engage, delight and gain information about things of our past.

Further, the photos usually tie to past posts on this blog, bring back old material before new audiences. (I also put some History Mysteries on my own Facebook page. Feel free to like.)

Almost all posts to YDR Facebook gain a reach of 10,000 people and many 20,000 and above. A couple, 50,000 +.

I often bring these YDR Facebook “embeds” back to posts to this blog, as well.

You might see more of these history mysteries on here as we go forward.

Enjoy, and feel free to like, share or comment. If you’re stumped, click on the link and you’ll be delivered to the answer! Continue reading “It’s a History Mystery! Photos/stories score well on Facebook, other social media” »

Posted in Archives, all posts, Events, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, One-room schools, Quizzes & (fun) tests, School days, Susquehanna, waterways, Unsung/obscure sites, YorkEats: Hogmaw & such | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Quiet Arles Park teaches active lessons about York, Pa.

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This marker, with plaque, marks Arles Park in York, Pa.’s, east end. The plaque gives a brief history of the city park at East King and Pattison streets. It was dedicated in 1961, six years after the formation of York Twinning Association. That community group formed an alliance with Arles, France, the source of the French name attached to the park. Also of interest: York still twinning with France, Germany after 50-plus years.

 

 

 

 
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The other day, I noted that visiting York’s parks is a good way to get to know the city.

Arles Park, I wrote, was the only one of the 25 city rec areas that I have not visited. (I’ve even been to tiny and obscure Little Jimmy’s Park on the city’s north side).

I’ve now completed the tour, spending some time in Arles Park.

There’s a lot to that park, even though empty in my mid-morning weekday visit. Continue reading “Quiet Arles Park teaches active lessons about York, Pa.” »

Posted in All politics is local, Archives, all posts, Explanations/controversy, For photo fans, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Pain & trauma, Unsung/obscure sites, War, World War II, York City neighborhoods | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

High Rock in York County, Pa. So, which High Rock is this?

Linked in/Neat stuff: Outfitting the CW re-enactor/All roads lead to York

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Chris Otto tells us about all kinds of interesting things over at Papergreat.com. He found the High Rock postcard above. The question seems to be: Which York County High Rock is it? Maybe one of you can help? A couple of us have weighed in, as you will see by clicking on the comments icon. (Update:) As you’ll see in comments, geologist Jeri Jones’ weighed in on the location of these rocks. His final judgment: In the Pigeon Hills near the intersection of High Rock Road and Moulstown Road. So, mystery solved?

Meanwhile, here’s another Facebook post that locates one High Rock in York County:

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At Duncannon’s Red Rabbit, it’s OK to ask for extra Bunny Dust

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The Red Rabbit experience awaits motorists traveling on Route 322 about 15 miles north of Harrisburg. It’s, indeed, an experience. A delicious experience. The drive-in’s motto?  ‘Make Red Rabbit a Habit.’ They succeeded. Also of interest: Decision at Hanover’s Tropical Treat – Fat boy or Italian steak?

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These hamburger places and their coveted recipes.

York County’s wonderful Bury’s red sauce recipe, though widely published, is closely held. In fact, a secret.

Perry County’s Red Rabbit has mysterious Bunny Dust which it sprinkles on its burgers, fries (online reviewers say ask for extra) and other menu items. Continue reading “At Duncannon’s Red Rabbit, it’s OK to ask for extra Bunny Dust” »

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Made in York? Oui! York Wallcoverings found in homes worldwide

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York Wallcoverings’ Ron Redding provided numerous examples changes in wallpaper over time and told the story about the evolution of the wallpaper industry over the centuries at a recent Glen Rock Historic Preservation Society meeting. Here, he shows a photograph of an 100-plus-year-old surface press, as he holds a hand-produced block cut to manually make wallpaper designs. Today, the surface presses remain in use, but many designs are performed digitally. Also of interest:  Also of interest: Keystone Color Works to be brushed up for Artspace?

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Ron Redding knows wallpaper.

The York Wallcoverings Designer intrigued a Glen Rock Historic Preservation Society audience with the facts and impressions about wallpaper over the centuries.

Here are six points from the presentation, in which Redding produced numerous samples of how wallpaper design changed over the centuries: Continue reading “Made in York? Oui! York Wallcoverings found in homes worldwide” »

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How Kiwanis Lake has changed since it was developed in 1952

Linked in/Neat stuff: U.S. 30 Drag-O-Way revisited/Engraver Christian Gobrecht Kiwanis Lake July 1, 2014  Paul Kuehnel - Daily Record/Sunday News

 ’Picturing History’ captures a then & now scene from Kiwanis Lake. Sometimes, Kiwanis Lake is mushed in with nearby Farquhar Park. But this list from the City of York separates it out among the 25 parks listed on its website. Check out that list. How many parks have you visited? The only one that I’ve never stepped foot in is Arles Park (though I’ve written about it.) I didn’t immediately see Renaissance Park on the list. The city inventory also puts forth some parks that might surprise you – Cherry Lane, for example. Of these parks, Kiwanis Lake is one of the most popular, developed in 1952. This was about the time that developments in that area of the city – Fireside, for example – were going in. From the background in this photo, so was the Med Ed building. (See all the posts – with special sliders that enhance the before-and-after view – that are part of the ‘Picturing History’ series.) Also of interest: Kiwanis Lake: York countians have stayed at home there for decades.

Other neat stuff from all over… .

Continue reading “How Kiwanis Lake has changed since it was developed in 1952” »

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In the former Formprest building: York countians locate things by what used to be there

Linked in/Neat stuff: Spring Grove bridge named after hero/Mystery Springetts farmstead
The new location of Handsome Cab (white building, a wine bar, will be located in the former Formpress building at 104-106 North George Street in York. Pictures before renovation of the building begins July 2, 2014.  Paul Kuehnel - Daily Record/Sunday News
York countians are good at this: When something is opening somewhere, we describe it as being in the former such and such building. Well, a wine bar on North George Street is going into the former Formprest cleaners building (white building above). The Handsome Cab is one of two wine bars opening in that area, examples of boutique-like business opening its doors in that part of town. Like others in the Market/Arts District, it will devote upper-floor space to art galleries and studios. The business is expected to open late this year or next. See a photo gallery of the old building’s interior and this FlipsidePa.com story that explains more. Here’s a former building example:  1 York, Pa. building, 100 years: From Red’s bikes to Redeux market. Also of interest: It’s a fun game: What used to where in York County, Pa.

From the third floor staircase above the future location of the Handsome Cab, a wine bar, that will be located in the former Formpress building at 104-106 North George Street in York. Pictures before renovation of the building begins July 2, 1014.  Paul Kuehnel - Daily Record/Sunday News
York countians also have another saying. They just don’t make them like this anymore. The once-attractive staircase in the old Formprest building no doubt will be spruced up, when it leads to artist lofts and studios.

Other neat stuff from all over … . Continue reading “In the former Formprest building: York countians locate things by what used to be there” »

Posted in Archives, all posts, Art & artists, Explanations/controversy, Farms & fields, For photo fans, Linked in/neat stuff, Local journalism & Web, Local landmarks, Nostalgia & memories, People, Small-town life, Unsung/obscure sites, War, York City neighborhoods, YorkEats: Hogmaw & such | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments